Alain.R.Truong

26 mars 2015

A large Qingbai carved 'twin fish' bowl, China, Southern Song Dynasty, 12th century

A large Qingbai carved 'twin fish' bowl, China, Southern Song Dynasty, 12th century

A large Qingbai carved 'twin fish' bowl, China, Southern Song Dynasty, 12th centuryEstimate $5,000 - $7,000. Price Realized $5,250Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

The bowl has rounded conical sides applied on the interior with six slip ribs above two fish with combed details carved in the center, covered inside and out with a glaze of aqua color below the unglazed rim - 7 ¼ in. (18.5 cm.) diameter, box

Provenance: The Collection of Robert H. Ellsworth, New York, acquired in Hong Kong, 1986.

Christie's. THE COLLECTION OF ROBERT HATFIELD ELLSWORTH PART IV - CHINESE WORKS OF ART: METALWORK, SCULPTURE AND EARLY CERAMICS, 20 March 2015, New York, Rockefeller Plaza.


A pair of Qingbai-type jars and covers, China, Southern Song-Yuan Dynasty, 12th-13th century

A pair of Qingbai-type jars and covers, China, Southern Song-Yuan Dynasty, 12th-13th century

A pair of Qingbai-type jars and covers, China, Southern Song-Yuan Dynasty, 12th-13th centuryEstimate $4,000 - $6,000. Price Realized $23,750Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

Each body divided into six lobes by vertical, double incised lines, with four small loops applied to the stepped shoulder, and each with lightly stepped cover, the exterior covered with a mottled glaze of pale grey-green color pooling in the recesses, the interior and foot unglazed exposing the white ware - 4 ¾ in. (12.5 cm.) high, box

Provenance: The Collection of Robert H. Ellsworth, New York, acquired in Hong Kong, 1988.

Notes: A similar covered jar, but lacking the incised vertical lines on the body and with taller neck, is illustrated in Bright as Silver, White as Snow: Chinese White Ceramics from the Late Tang to Yuan Dynasty, Hong Kong, 1998, p. 148, pl. 32, where it is cited that such covered vessels were used as storage containers for food and tea powder. Another jar with ten lobes and more bluish glaze from the Avery Brundage Collection, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, is illustrated by S. Pierson (ed.), Qingbai Ware: Chinese Porcelain of the Song and Yuan Dynasties, Percival David Foundation of Chinese Art, 2002, p. 172, pl. 91.

Christie's. THE COLLECTION OF ROBERT HATFIELD ELLSWORTH PART IV - CHINESE WORKS OF ART: METALWORK, SCULPTURE AND EARLY CERAMICS, 20 March 2015, New York, Rockefeller Plaza.

A Northern brown-glazed lobed ewer, China, Five Dynasties period-Northern Song dynasty, 10th-11th century

A Northern brown-glazed lobed ewer, China, Five Dynasties period-Northern Song dynasty, 10th-11th century

A Northern brown-glazed lobed ewer, China, Five Dynasties period-Northern Song dynasty, 10th-11th centuryEstimate $8,000 - $12,000. Price Realized $15,000. Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

The ovoid body divided into six lobes by carved double lines, and with curved spout and handle, the shoulder applied with two small molded tabs attached to the trumpet-shaped neck, covered overall with a dark brown glaze thinning to mushroom on the edges, the foot left unglazed, exposing the buff ware - 8 1/8 in. (21.5 cm.) high, box

Provenance: The Collection of Robert H. Ellsworth, New York, acquired in Hong Kong, 1987.

Christie's. THE COLLECTION OF ROBERT HATFIELD ELLSWORTH PART IV - CHINESE WORKS OF ART: METALWORK, SCULPTURE AND EARLY CERAMICS, 20 March 2015, New York, Rockefeller Plaza.

Two Longquan celadon bottle vases, China, Southern Song Dynasty (1127-1279)

Two Longquan celadon bottle vases, China, Southern Song Dynasty (1127-1279)

Two Longquan celadon bottle vases, China, Southern Song Dynasty (1127-1279)Estimate $8,000 - $12,000. Price Realized $15,000Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

Each with a globular body and tall neck, one covered with a pale sea-green glaze, the other with a pale greyish-green glaze - 5 7/8 in. (15 cm.) high, box

The Collection of Robert H. Ellsworth, New York

Christie's. THE COLLECTION OF ROBERT HATFIELD ELLSWORTH PART IV - CHINESE WORKS OF ART: METALWORK, SCULPTURE AND EARLY CERAMICS, 20 March 2015, New York, Rockefeller Plaza.

A rare large Yaozhou celadon carved conical bowl, China, Northern Song-Jin Dynasty, 11th-12th century

A rare large Yaozhou celadon carved conical bowl, China, Northern Song-Jin Dynasty, 11th-12th century

A rare large Yaozhou celadon carved conical bowl, China, Northern Song-Jin Dynasty, 11th-12th centuryEstimate $20,000 - $30,000. Price Realized $7,500Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

The deep, rounded conical bowl carved on the interior with a central flower head below a wide band of leafy meander bearing six blossoms alternately shown in full bloom and in profile, and the exterior carved with simplified petals rising from the foot to a line below the somewhat everted rim, covered overall and on the base, with a glaze of greyish-olive color - 8 1/8 in. (20.7 cm.) diameter, box

Provenance: The Collection of Robert H. Ellsworth, New York, acquired in Hong Kong, 1988.

Christie's. THE COLLECTION OF ROBERT HATFIELD ELLSWORTH PART IV - CHINESE WORKS OF ART: METALWORK, SCULPTURE AND EARLY CERAMICS, 20 March 2015, New York, Rockefeller Plaza.



A Yue-type celadon carved ewer, China, Early Northern Song dynasty (AD 960-1127)

A Yue-type celadon carved ewer, China, Early Northern Song dynasty (AD 960-1127)

A Yue-type celadon carved ewer, China, Early Northern Song dynasty (AD 960-1127)Estimate $6,000 - $8,000. Price Realized $8,750Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

The oviform body divided into six lobes, each freely carved with a flower, with a pair of small loops applied to the shoulder between the curved spout and S-shaped handle, the cylindrical neck rising to the dished mouth, covered overall with an olive-green glaze - 7 ½ in. (20 cm.) high, box

Provenance: The Collection of Robert H. Ellsworth, New York, acquired in Hong Kong, 1986.

Christie's. THE COLLECTION OF ROBERT HATFIELD ELLSWORTH PART IV - CHINESE WORKS OF ART: METALWORK, SCULPTURE AND EARLY CERAMICS, 20 March 2015, New York, Rockefeller Plaza.

A small Yaozhou celadon molded conical bowl, China, Northern Song-Jin Dynasty, 12th-13th century

A small Yaozhou celadon molded conical bowl, China, Northern Song-Jin Dynasty, 12th-13th century

A small Yaozhou celadon molded conical bowl, China, Northern Song-Jin Dynasty, 12th-13th centuryEstimate $3,000 - $5,000. Price Realized $8,125Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

The center of the interior molded with a flower head below leafy foliate meander bearing flowers alternately shown in full bloom and in profile, the exterior cut with simplified petals rising to the slightly everted rim, covered overall with a glaze of olive color; 3 ¾ in. (9.5 cm.) diameter, box

Provenance: The Collection of Robert H. Ellsworth, New York, acquired in Hong Kong, 1987.

Christie's. THE COLLECTION OF ROBERT HATFIELD ELLSWORTH PART IV - CHINESE WORKS OF ART: METALWORK, SCULPTURE AND EARLY CERAMICS, 20 March 2015, New York, Rockefeller Plaza.

A rare deep Junyao bowl, China, Northern Song-Jin Dynasty (AD 960-1234)

A rare deep Junyao bowl, China, Northern Song-Jin Dynasty (AD 960-1234)

A rare deep Junyao bowl, China, Northern Song-Jin Dynasty (AD 960-1234)Estimate $12,000 - $18,000. Price Realized $13,750Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

With deep rounded sides, covered inside and out with a thick glaze of bluish-turquoise tone thinning to mushroom at the rim and falling in thick drops on the short foot, the foot and base unglazed except for a drop of glaze on the base, the center of the interior unglazed exposing the brown ware - 7 ½ in. (18.4 cm.) diameter, box

Provenance: The Collection of Robert H. Ellsworth, New York, acquired in Hong Kong, 1988

NotesCompare the Junyao bowl of the same unusual shape and large size in the Metropolitan Museum of Art illustrated by S. Valenstein in A Handbook of Chinese Ceramics, New York, 1989 ed., p. 100, no. 94. See, also, the Junyao deep bowl of very similar form, but of slightly smaller size (17.8 cm. diameter, 15 cm. high), in the Palace Museum, Beijing, illustrated in Zhongguo Taoci Quanji, Junyao (Jun Ware), vol. 12, Shanghai, 1983, no. 36.

Christie's. THE COLLECTION OF ROBERT HATFIELD ELLSWORTH PART IV - CHINESE WORKS OF ART: METALWORK, SCULPTURE AND EARLY CERAMICS, 20 March 2015, New York, Rockefeller Plaza.

Exhibition of photographs by Cathleen Naundorf on view at Galerie Edwynn Houk

Cathleen Naundorf, My Paradise Bird I, Chanel - Haute Couture Winter 2006 - n°53, 2008

Cathleen Naundorf, My Paradise Bird I, Chanel - Haute Couture Winter 2006 - n°53, 2008. Gelatin silver print.

ZURICH.- Galerie Edwynn Houk is presenting an exhibition of photographs by Cathleen Naundorf (German, b 1968). This is the Paris-based photographer’s first exhibition with the gallery and her first within Switzerland. 

Cathleen Naundorf studied painting and photography in the 1980s in Münich. It was a longstanding friendship and mentorship with the acclaimed fashion photographer Horst P. Horst (1906-1999) that sparked her interest in fashion photography. Through Horst’s tutelage and guidance, she began photographing backstage at Paris fashion shows for Condé Nast from the mid 1990s. 

Cathleen Naundorf, La fille en plâtre VII, Dior Haute Couture Summer 2007, 2009

Cathleen Naundorf, La fille en plâtre VII, Dior Haute Couture Summer 2007, 2009

Since 2005, Naundorf has been working on a series called “Un rêve de mode,” focusing on famous couture fashion houses including Chanel, Dior, Gaultier, Valentino, Elie Saab and Christian Lacroix. Because of her extensive knowledge and understanding of the garments, and her close rapport with the designers themselves, Naundorf has been granted unprecedented access to these Houses’s couture collections. She has been able to personally select gowns from the couturiers’ archives, and with her team of models, assistants, make-up artists, and hairdressers, she constructs elaborate and almost cinematic settings for her photographs, capturing the grace, grandeur, and remarkable beauty of the clothes. 

Cathleen Naundorf, La parisienne I, Dior - Haute Couture Winter 2009 - n°10, 2010

Cathleen Naundorf, La parisienne I, Dior - Haute Couture Winter 2009 - n°10, 2010. 

For nearly 15 years, Naundorf has been using large format cameras with Polaroid film. After shooting the image, she then transfers the film onto a special paper. Using various techniques and manipulations directly on the transfer, she creates a plethora of surface particularities, visible on the final chromogenic prints – the bleeding and blurring of the images, the pooling of color. For the black and white pictures, also shot on Polaroid film, each is reworked and retouched by hand. In all of her pictures, the various marks, distortions, and reworkings give the effect of a passing of time to a long ago grand age of elegance and beauty. 

Cathleen Naundorf, Secret times (Grand palais I), Chanel – Haute Couture Summer 2010 – n°48 & 49, 2010

Cathleen Naundorf, Secret times (Grand palais I), Chanel – Haute Couture Summer 2010 – n°48 & 49, 2010. 

Naundorf has exhibited extensively in Europe and in America, and her work is frequently published in various fashion and lifestyle magazines including Harpers Bazaar and Elle. The book Haute Couture: the Polaroids of Cathleen Naundorf was published in 2012 in a limited edition by Prestel. Naundorf lives and works in Paris.

Cathleen Naundorf, Untitled, Dior Haute Couture Summer 2007, 2009

Cathleen Naundorf, Untitled, Dior Haute Couture Summer 2007, 2009. 

Cathleen Naundorf, La parisienne III, Dior - Haute Couture Winter 2009 - n°10, 2010

Cathleen Naundorf, La parisienne III, Dior Haute Couture Winter 2009 - n°10, 2010. 

Cathleen Naundorf, Le dernier été, Dior – Haute Couture Winter 2009 – n°27, 2010

Cathleen Naundorf, Le dernier été, Dior Haute Couture Winter 2009 – n°27, 2010. 

Cathleen Naundorf, Around the hat, Philip Treacy, 2009

Cathleen Naundorf, Around the hat, Philip Treacy, 2009

Cathleen Naundorf, 5pm Kensington, Philip Treacy, 2009

Cathleen Naundorf, 5pm Kensington, Philip Treacy, 2009. 

Cathleen Naundorf, The Evolution of Fashion I, Dior Haute Couture Winter 2004 - n°6, 2010

Cathleen Naundorf, The Evolution of Fashion I, Dior Haute Couture Winter 2004 - n°6, 2010.

Cathleen Naundorf, The Evolution of Fashion II, Dior - Haute Couture Winter 2004 - n°25, 2010

Cathleen Naundorf, The Evolution of Fashion II, Dior Haute Couture Winter 2004 - n°25, 2010.

An Ordinary Day, Valentino - Haute Couture Summer 2008 - n°20, 2008

Cathleen Naundorf, An Ordinary Day, Valentino Haute Couture Summer 2008 - n°20, 2008.

Prima Ballerina II, Valentino - Haute Couture 1959, 2012

Cathleen Naundorf, Prima Ballerina II, Valentino Haute Couture 1959, 2012.

Valentino en rose, Valentino - Haute Couture Winter 2007 - n°59, 2007

Cathleen Naundorf, Valentino en rose, Valentino Haute Couture Winter 2007 - n°59, 2007.

My little darling, Dior – Haute Couture Winter 2006 – n°30, 2009

Cathleen Naundorf, My little darling, Dior Haute Couture Winter 2006 – n°30, 2009.

Les deux camélias, Chanel - Haute Couture Summer 2009 - n°30 & 60, 2009

Cathleen Naundorf, Les deux camélias, Chanel Haute Couture Summer 2009 - n°30 & 60, 2009.

The doubt I, Jean-Paul Gaultier – Haute Couture Summer 2009, 2009

Cathleen Naundorf, The doubt I, Jean-Paul Gaultier Haute Couture Summer 2009, 2009.

La fille en plâtre VIII, Dior - Haute Couture Summer 2007, 2009

Cathleen Naundorf, La fille en plâtre VIII, Dior Haute Couture Summer 2007, 2009.

Dolly IV, Dior - Haute Couture Winter 2005 - n°7, 2009

Cathleen Naundorf, Dolly IV, Dior Haute Couture Winter 2005 - n°7, 2009.

'Rubens in Private: The Master Portrays his Family' opens at The Rubens House

Peter Paul Rubens, ‘Self-portrait in a Circle of Friends from Mantua’, approx

Peter Paul Rubens, ‘Self-portrait in a Circle of Friends from Mantua’, approx. 1602-1604, oil on canvas, 78 x 101 cm. Cologne, Wallraf-Richartz Museum, inv. no. Dep 248. © Rheinisches Bildarchiv, Wallraf-Richartz-Museum & Fondation Corboud, Köln, Loan of the Federal Republic of Germany.

ANTWERP.- The Rubens House is holding a unique exhibition of Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640) as the portrait painter of his relatives. These are the most beautiful and intimate portraits ever painted by Rubens. For Rubens in Private. The Master Portrays his Family, these stunning portraits returned to Rubens’ former home for the first time. 

Michelangelo found the art of portraiture trivial and even Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640), as an artist, did not immediately develop a particular fondness for the genre. Yet, Rubens was one of the best portraitists of his time. He displayed unparalleled dexterity in his portraits and was able to suggest an almost palpable sense of presence. The finest, most surprising portraits produced by Rubens were those of his close relatives, who were indeed very dear to him.

A labor of love 
Rubens’ intimate portraits were never intended for public display, and are therefore significantly freer and more experimental than the commissioned portraits he made of influential figures. Nothing in these paintings seems idealized. They are rare honest works, conveying much love at the same time. While the hundreds of letters he wrote hardly tell us anything about his emotional life, the portraits of Rubens’ intimates show in a very special way how much affection he had for his first and second wife, his brother and his children. One of the unique qualities of Rubens’ family portraits from a human perspective is the role played by communication. The glances and looks give the portraits dramatic expression and life. The painter shows us almost everything he has to tell us in the gazes exchanged by people through what they and we see. 

The main motivation for creating a portrait was and is the need to remember someone by. The portraits Rubens painted of his close relatives illustrate the artist’s existential need to perpetuate the memory of his loved ones on canvas. Like Leonardo da Vinci, Rubens believed that portraits preserved the beauty which would otherwise be destroyed by nature and time. For Leonardo and Rubens, however, a portrait was only a success if it showed what is typically regarded as invisible and elusive: the subject’s inner life or character. 

A confident and distinguished gentleman 
Although mainly concerned with providing an accurate representation and likeness, portraits usually offer more than mere resemblance; they also tell us something about the social status of the people portrayed, and the image of himself and of his family Rubens wanted to convey to the outside world. Nowhere is this better illustrated than in Rubens’ phenomenal self-portraits. In them he invariably presented himself as a man of taste, a cultivated person who had learned to live with an equal measure of reason and feeling. In this Rubens fully fitted the profile of the perfect gentilhuomo from Il cortegiano (The Book of the Courtier) by Baldassare Castiglione, one of the key texts of the Renaissance and a book still highly valued by today’s culture lovers. The Book of the Courtier is of great historical significance not only because Castiglione describes in it the good taste and ideals prevalent at the height of the Italian Renaissance, but also because it had a major impact on culture in other European countries. For instance, this ideal courtier was the model for the English gentleman.  

Since the Renaissance, portraits of famous masters have been considered as collectibles by a relatively small elite. Already in the 1620s, the English King Charles I owned a stunning self-portrait of Rubens, and later in the 17th century, Rubens would be represented by one of his self-portraits in the no less renowned Medici collection in Florence. In ‘Rubens in Private’, these are presented together for the first time. The Self-Portrait from the Rubens House was restored in the National Gallery of London especially for the exhibition.  

A parade of masterpieces 
In addition to Rubens’ self-portraits , ‘Rubens in Private’ is offering a whole parade of masterpieces, such as the beautiful, meditative portrait of his beloved brother Philip, drawn and painted portraits of both his wives Isabella Brant and Helena Fourment, and portraits of his children. Isabella, who died relatively young, was Rubens’ great love and support for seventeen years. In the portraits the artist made of her, she looks at us with twinkling eyes and blushing cheeks. She looks so radiant, she almost seems to shine. One can only paint like that when one feels completely at ease with the other. Four years after Isabella’s death, Rubens married the seventeen-year-old Helena, “the most beautiful girl in Antwerp”. He experienced a second youth with her and Helena remained an important source of inspiration until his death.  

Not only the nobility, everyone who could afford it would have portraits of their children, or their own portray painted. The main motive behind all these portraits was simple: to show the great pride and love of parents for their offspring. The study of the head of Rubens’ eldest daughter Clara Serena is one of the highlights of the exhibition. The portrait shows Clara at her sweetest, yet looking very spontaneous and natural. The artist concentrated all his attention on the child’s face which became the focus of the composition. Here, the viewer is confronted with a close-up which is further enhanced by the sustained gaze of the almond-shaped eyes. When Rubens painted her, Clara must have been around five years old. She died in 1623 at the age of twelve.  

Almost four hundred years later, Rubens’ family portraits are still full of life. ‘Rubens in Private. The Master Portrays his Family brings together some fifty masterpieces from international museums, among which Amsterdam’s Rijksmuseum, the Cleveland Museum of Art, the Uffizi in Florence, the Mauritshuis in The Hague, the British Museum in London, the Musée du Louvre in Paris, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Hermitage in Saint-Petersburg, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, the Albertina Museum and the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna, the Liechtenstein Princely Collections and the British Royal Collection. 

Peter Paul Rubens, Filips Rubens, 1611-1612

Peter Paul Rubens, 'Filips Rubens', 1611-1612, oil on panel, 68.5 x 54 cm. © Detroit Institute of Arts, USA, Gift of William E. Scripps in memory of his son, James E. Scripps II / Bridgeman Images. 



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