Alain.R.Truong

31 mars 2015

A Cizhou sgraffiato pear-shaped vase, yuhuchunping, Jin dynasty (1115-1234)

A Cizhou sgraffiato pear-shaped vase, yuhuchunping, Jin dynasty (1115-1234)

A Cizhou sgraffiato pear-shaped vase, yuhuchunping, Jin dynasty (1115-1234)Estimate HK$600,000 – HK$800,000 ($77,734 - $103,645). Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

The elegantly potted vase is freely carved through the white slip to the buff body with a wide band enclosing a floral design, set within borders of stylised foliage at the neck and overlapping leaf lappets near the base. 11 1/4 in. (29 cm.) high, box 

Provenance: The Muwen Tang Collection, Hong Kong 

Christie's. THE PAVILION SALE - CHINESE CERAMICS AND WORKS OF ART, 6 April 2015, 22nd Floor


A green Jun dish, Jin-Yuan Dynasty (1115-1368)

A green Jun dish, Jin-Yuan Dynasty (1115-1368)

A green Jun dish, Jin-Yuan Dynasty (1115-1368)Estimate HK$50,000 – HK$70,000 ($6,478 - $9,069). Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

The dish with shallow sides rises to an everted rim and is covered inside and out with a crackled glaze of rich greyish-green colour falling to the ring foot to expose the buff body. 5 in. (12.8 cm.) diam., box  

Provenance: The Muwen Tang Collection, Hong Kong 

Christie's. THE PAVILION SALE - CHINESE CERAMICS AND WORKS OF ART, 6 April 2015, 22nd Floor

A moulded Yaozhou celadon bowl, Song dynasty (960-1279)

A moulded Yaozhou celadon bowl, Song dynasty (960-1279)

A moulded Yaozhou celadon bowl, Song dynasty (960-1279)Estimate HK$80,000 – HK$120,000 ($10,365 - $15,547). Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

Of deep conical shape, the interior is moulded with scrolling chrysanthemum on leafy vines. The centre is further moulded with a single chrysanthemum flowerhead and covered overall in a glaze of olive green tone. 5 1/8 (13 cm.) diam., box 

Provenance: The Muwen Tang Collection, Hong Kong 

Christie's. THE PAVILION SALE - CHINESE CERAMICS AND WORKS OF ART, 6 April 2015, 22nd Floor

A Yaozhou celadon bowl, Northern Song dynasty (960-1127)

A Yaozhou celadon bowl, Northern Song dynasty (960-1127)

Yaozhou celadon bowl, Northern Song dynasty (960-1127)Estimate HK$30,000 – HK$50,000 ($3,887 - $6,478). Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

The bowl is well potted with slightly rounded conical sides and covered overall with a pale celadon glaze, exposing the buff body at the base of the foot. 5 3/8 in. (13.8 cm.) diam., box 

Provenance: The Muwen Tang Collection, Hong Kong 

Christie's. THE PAVILION SALE - CHINESE CERAMICS AND WORKS OF ART, 6 April 2015, 22nd Floor

A Yaozhou celadon bowl, Northern Song dynasty (960-1127)

A Yaozhou celadon bowl, Northern Song dynasty (960-1127)

A Yaozhou celadon bowl, Northern Song dynasty (960-1127)Estimate HK$24,000 – HK$35,000 ($3,109 - $4,534). Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

The bowl is potted with slightly rounded conical sides and covered overall with a pale celadon glaze, exposing the buff body at the base of the foot. 5 3/8 in. (13.6 cm.) diam., box

Provenance: The Muwen Tang Collection, Hong Kong 

Christie's. THE PAVILION SALE - CHINESE CERAMICS AND WORKS OF ART, 6 April 2015, 22nd Floor



A Huozhou white-glazed bowl, Northern Song-Jin Dynasty (960-1234)

A Huozhou white-glazed bowl, Northern Song-Jin Dynasty (960-1234)

A Huozhou white-glazed bowl, Northern Song-Jin Dynasty (960-1234)Estimate HK$50,000 – HK$80,000 ($6,478 - $10,365). Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

The bowl is potted with flaring sides rising from a short foot and covered in and out with a semi-translucent white glaze. 4 3/8 in. (11.4 cm.) diam., box 

Provenance: The Muwen Tang Collection, Hong Kong 

Christie's. THE PAVILION SALE - CHINESE CERAMICS AND WORKS OF ART, 6 April 2015, 22nd Floor

La Maison Souquet à Pigalle décorée par Jacques Garcia

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La Maison Souquet à Pigalle décorée par Jacques Garcia

Une ex-maison close de Pigalle se transforme, sous les doigts du grand décorateur, en garçonnière joliment coquine. 

By courtesy of AD Magazine

 

Posté par Alain Truong à 16:29 - - Commentaires [0] - Permalien [#]
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The Tiger of Mysore Tipu Sultan's weaponry for sale at Bonhams' Islamic and Indian art auction

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The collection – which has been exhibited and published – features sabres, gem-set trophy swords, embroidered arrow quivers, exquisite quilted helmets, blunderbusses, fowling pieces, sporting guns, pistols, and a three-pounder bronze cannon – each and every weapon a work of art in its own right. Photo: Bonhams.

LONDON.- A spectacular collection of arms and armour once owned by Tipu Sultan, the last King of Mysore, will be sold by Bonhams as part of the Islamic and Indian art auction at Bonhams New Bond Street on 21 April 2015. All the lots in the auction come from a single collection. 

The collection – which has been exhibited and published – features sabres, gem-set trophy swords, embroidered arrow quivers, exquisite quilted helmets, blunderbusses, fowling pieces, sporting guns, pistols, and a three-pounder bronze cannon – each and every weapon a work of art in its own right. 

Tipu’s personal motif was the tiger, and he adorned both objects of art and instruments of war with images of the animal and with the tiger-stripe design, earning the nickname, ‘Tiger of Mysore’. As Robin Wigington notes in The Firearms of Tipu Sultan 1783-1799, ‘the incorporation of the bubri (the tiger stripe),’ is what makes Tipu’s firearms unique. ‘Although the tiger stripe as an art form was widely used throughout the Islamic world, and notably in India from early times, Tipu’s particular pattern of stripe was very much his own.’ 

The Tiger of Mysore – who famously declared ‘I would rather live one day as a tiger than a lifetime as a sheep’ – was the East India Company’s most tenacious enemy, fighting them until his death in 1799. He was a fanatical and relentless warrior, and vowed not to sit on his elaborate throne until he had vanquished the British. 

He is widely considered one of the most accomplished and daring rulers of pre-colonial India, having devised campaigns which inflicted humiliating defeats on the British. These campaigns were often based on the latest technology in weaponry, and it is believed that he introduced the military rocket for attacks on enemy infantry, a tactic which won him numerous victories over the seemingly invincible British armies. 

In Bonhams Magazine, William Dalrymple recounted the emperor’s final defeat at the hands of the British: ‘When the British finally captured Tipu’s capital city of Seringapatam in 1799, the conquerors were astonished at the magnificence of the jewels and art objects that Tipu had collected. According to Major Price, who was responsible for collecting and dividing the booty: ‘The wealth of the palace, which was sufficiently dazzling to the eyes of many who were much more habituated to the sight of horded treasure than we were, seemed, at that moment, to surpass all estimates.”

An important rare gem-set Sword with Tiger's head pommel from the Royal Regalia of Tipu Sultan, Seringapatam, circa 1787-93

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An important rare gem-set Sword with Tiger's head pommel from the Royal Regalia of Tipu Sultan, Seringapatam, circa 1787-93Estimate £60,000 - 80,000 (€82,000 - 110,000)Photo: Bonhams.

the tiger-head pommel cast, chased and engraved gold in the round on a wooden core, inlaid with diamonds and rubies, the tiger's left ear slightly bent, the teeth of diamond and the tongue of ruby, the collar studied with rubies, the rest of the hilt of gilded silver, cast, chased and engraved, the grip inlaid with diamonds, rubies and emeralds in a bubri pattern, a gold-set garnet inlaid on either side of the quillon block, quillons in the shape of tiger claws, langets shaped into an ogival point, the slightly curved double-sided blade of 15th Century Eastern Mediterranean manufacture previously from the treasury of Tipu Sultan, the 19th Century wooden scabbard in the orientalising fashion with black leather covering overlaid with gilded floral motifs, six gilded silver openwork mounts with calligraphic roundels and a floral and vegetal motifs around the borders, the metal fittings engraved with bubri patterns along the borders - 80.7 cm. long; the whole 98 cm. long(2)

Provenance:  Robin Wigington collection, the Arms and Armour Museum, Stratford-upon-Avon;
Private collection, acquired Sotheby's, The Tipu Sultan Sale, 25th May 2015, lot 7. 

ExhibitedThe Tiger and the Thistle. Tipu Sultan and the Scots in India 1760 – 1800, National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh, 1999;
Tigers around the Throne. The Court of Tipu Sultan (1750-99), Zamana Gallery, London, 1990 

PublishedBuddle, Anne, Rohatgi, Pauline and Brown, Iain Gordon, The Tiger and the Thistle. Tipu Sultan and the Scots in India 1760 – 1800, Exhibition Catalogue, Edinburgh, 1999, pp. 22 and 25, pl. 25;
Buddle, Anne, Tigers around the Throne. The Court of Tipu Sultan (1750-99), London, 1990, pp. 42-43;
Hales, Robert, Islamic and Oriental Arms and Armour, n.p., 2013, p. 182, no. 433.
Wigington, Robin, 'Souvenir Weaponry from Seringapatam' in The Journal of the Arms & Armour Society, vol. XV, no. 3, March 1996, p. 143 and fig. 1. 

NotesInscriptions: On the scabbard mounts, Surat al-Saff (lxi), verse 13; and twice, 'And [you will obtain] another [favour] that you love - victory from Allah and an imminent conquest; and give good tidings to the believers.'

The tiger's head pommel of this sword is ensuite, and reduced in size, with the tiger-head finials which were mounted on the corners of Tipu's throne. Because of its size, it was clearly not one of these finials, but its close affinity suggests that it was part of the Sultan's royal regalia, possibly from a rod of office. It was almost certainly produced by the same craftsmen in the Royal Workshops alongside the other tiger finials (see below) and the huma bird which is now in the Royal Collection (Moienuddin, Mohammed,Sunset at Srirangapatam. After the Death of Tipu Sultan, Hyderabad, 2000, pp.45-53). 

Only four finials from the guard-rail of Tipu's fabled throne are known to have survived: the best known example is in the Clive Collection at Powis Castle, acquired by the second Lady Clive in India, a gift from Lord Wellesley; a second, acquired after the battle by Surgeon-Major Pultney Mein, either by allocation or in the agents' auction, was sold at Sotheby's (19 March 1973, lot 180) and then offered by a London antique dealer in 1974 (advertised in Oriental Art and the example referred to by Forrest as being in the collection of Alexander Bowlby of Hampstead, London), current whereabouts unknown; the Hope-Wallace finial sold through these rooms (Bonhams, Islamic and Indian Art, 2nd April 2009, lot 212), now in the collection of Sheikh Hamad bin Abdullah al-Thani (Jaffer, Amin, ed., Beyond Extravagance. A Royal Collection of Gems and Jewels, New York, 2013, p. 135); and the Bowser finial, also sold through these rooms (Bonhams, Islamic and Indian Art, 7th October 2010, lot 370). In addition to these four, Forrest refers tantalisingly to another finial in a private collection in Cornwall, but no further information or explanation is offered and there is no corroboration to be found in other sources.  

The head of this particular lot matches closely in workmanship that of the four surviving finials, but in terms of features is almost identical to the Hope-Wallace finial. The design is somewhat simpler than that on the larger finials, which can be accounted for by the much smaller size of the pommel. The method of manufacture is common to all the known finials, where the head was hammered into shape from gold sheet and then filled with lac to enable the details of the decoration to be filled without the head collapsing. The settings of the stones can be compared to South Indian temple jewellery and jewelled objects (see Filliozat, J. and P.Z. Pattabiramin, Parures Divines du Sud de l'Inde, Pondicherry, 1966). 

Another element of interest is the blade, which appears to be on 15th Century manufacture, probably Mamluk or Ottoman. An engraving at the forte, now largely obliterated, confirms that it was in Tipu's Royal Armoury where it was presumably among the "a great variety of curious swords" mentioned by Beatson in 1800 (A View of the Origin and Conduct of the War with Tippoo Sultaun comprising a narrative of the operations under the command of Lieutenant-General George Harris, and of the siege of Seringapatam, London, 1800, p.158).

A fine embroidered Quiver and Arm Guards, related Belt and seven decorated Arrows, Mysore, late 18th Century

A fine embroidered Quiver and Arm Guards, related Belt and seven decorated Arrows, Mysore, late 18th CenturyEstimate £40,000 - 60,000 (€55,000 - 82,000)Photo: Bonhams.

he quiver of leather lined with brown velvet and backed with red velvet, the background of the outer face woven with gilt thread (now tarnished) in a horizontal chevron pattern, a three-pointed leaf-like projection from the upper top and sides, embroidered floral and vegetal designs in red and brown velvets, suspension loops and two sets of four original decorative silk tassels on each side, the main part of the body embroidered with six pairs of large addorsed bubri stripes embroidered in gilt thread and pink silk at the edges enclosing black velvet and sequinned stripes; the matching arm guards extending from hand to elbow, the hand-guard with flower motif, the main panel with five pairs of addorsed bubri-stripes surmounted by a floral motif, the borders of red velvet embroidered with a repeating gold vegetal motif, the inner-guards each closed with a concealed iron hinge left and right; the belt of red velvet embroidered with gilt thread and bubri stripes in brown velvet, the border of blue silk, original chiselled steel buckle; and six bamboo arrows with pyramidal steel heads on a silver neck with copper inlays, the shafts gilded and painted with floral motifs, bone nocks, the flights later additions - the quiver 66 cm long; the arm defences 44 cm long (11)

ProvenanceRobin Wigington collection, the Arms and Armour Museum, Stratford-upon-Avon, until 2005;
Private collection, acquired Sotheby's, the Tipu Sultan Sale, 25th May, 2005, lot 20. 

ExhibitedTigers around the Throne. The Court of Tipu Sultan (1750-99), Zamana Gallery, London, 2nd August-14th October 1990.

PublishedBuddle, Anne, Tigers around the Throne. The Court of Tipu Sultan (1750-99), Zamana Gallery, London, 1990, pp. 62-63.

Notehe extremely high quality of these pieces, combined with the strong bubri-pattern theme, suggests that these would have been made for Tipu, a member of his family, or a high-ranking member of his court. The use here of metal thread, the colour scheme and the repeating bubri pattern are strongly reminiscent of panels associated with Tipu's tents or throne canopies [Stronge, Susan, Tipu's Tigers, London, 2009, p. 34], which reinforces the suggestion of royal provenance. Embroidering with gold and silver thread was a speciality of the Saurashtrika caste of northern Gujarat, and was introduced to Mysore when Haydar Ali deported 25 families of this caste from Tanjore [Buddle 1990, p. 34]. Another quiver of green velvet decorated in silver thread, now in Windsor Castle, contains arrows "taken from the Bed Room of the late Tippoo Saib and supposed to be poisoned" [ibid., p. 62].

A rare and fine Sword with bubri patterned watered blade from the Palace Armoury of Tipu Sultan, Seringapatam, circa 1782-99

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A rare and fine Sword with bubri patterned watered blade from the Palace Armoury of Tipu Sultan, Seringapatam, circa 1782-99Estimate £30,000 - 50,000 (€41,000 - 68,000)Photo: Bonhams.

the brass hilt cast in one piece, the pommel consisting of a tiger's head in the round, punched and engraved detail, bubri-patterns extending down the facetted grip, the quillons terminating in tiger-masks, one langet with bubri patterns and punched decoration, the other with a low-relief tiger-mask, the slender knuckle-guard terminating in a tiger-mask, the blade of curved sabre type, forged of watered steel formed into a repeating bubri pattern, later inlaid in gold on either side with the two-part inscription: No Me Embaines Sin Honor/ No Me Saques Sin Razon; the European scabbard and mounts of steel - the blade 77.8 cm. long; the whole 92.5 cm. long

ProvenanceRobin Wigington collection, the Arms and Armour Museum, Stratford-upon-Avon;
Private collection, acquired Sotheby's, The Tipu Sultan Sale, 25th May 2005, lot 6.  

PublishedWigington, Robin, "Souvenir Weaponry from Seringapatam" in The Journal of the Arms & Armour Society, vol. XV, no. 3, March 1996, pp. 143, 146 and fig. 2

Notes: IThis sword is unique among those with Seringapatam provenance with its watering in the form of Tipu's favoured bubripattern. Such decorative patterning would have been the product of only the most highly-skilled swordsmiths, implying that this would have been a special, perhaps royal, commission. The exceptional quality of the blade suggests that it might have formed part of Tipu's personal treasury, comparable to the 'Bedchamber Sword' which was presented to General Baird in 1799 (Dix, Noonan and Webb, The Baird Jewels and Archive, 19th September 2003, pp. 79-81). Sword hilts with the tiger as their decorative theme, such as the present example, have been associated with the patronage or personal ownership of Tipu himself, with one supposedly taken from his body at the Fall of Seringapatam. Examples of this type can be found in the Royal Collection, Windsor Castle, the Clive Collection, Powis Castle, and the Museum of Islamic Art, Doha (see Buddle, Anne, Tigers around the Throne. The Court of Tipu Sultan (1750-99), London, 1990, p.44); and other example were sold at Sotheby's (Arts of the Islamic World, 14th April 2010, lot 185 and Art of Imperial India, 9th October 2013, lot 249). 

The later inlaid inscription, which can be translated as 'Draw me not without reason/ Sheath me not without honour', is commonly found on European swords from the 17th Century onwards.

An exceptionally rare quilted Helmet with gold koftgari steel nasal bar, Mysore, late 18th Century 

An exceptionally rare quilted Helmet with gold koftgari steel nasal bar, Mysore, late 18th Century. Estimate £25,000 - 35,000 (€34,000 - 48,000)Photo: Bonhams.

of conical form with flaps to protect the cheeks and nape, the body of hide quilted with layered fabric, the outer face of blue silk embroidered with gold thread and sequins, decorated with a scale-pattern, lined with pink silk with a yellow silk border and pink piping, raised inner borders and segmental bands embroidered with a repeating bubri-pattern, the original pink silk tassel pendant extending from the skull, the original iron nasal bar with gold and silver koftgari floral motifs and the names of the Ahl al-Bayt, held in place with the original fabric brackets bearing floral motifs - 44.5 cm high

ProvenanceRobin Wigington collection, the Arms and Armour Museum, Stratford-upon-Avon;
Private collection, acquired Sotheby's, The Tipu Sultan Sale, 25th May 2005, lot 24.

ExhibitedTigers around the Throne. The Court of Tipu Sultan (1750-99), Zamana Gallery, London, 2nd August - 14th October 1990.

PublishedBuddle, Anne, Tigers around the Throne. The Court of Tipu Sultan (1750-99), Zamana Gallery, London, 1990, pp. 60-61.

Notes: Inscriptions: On the nasal guard: Allah, Muhammad, 'Ali, Fatima, Hasan, Husayn 

This quilted helmet can be compared to an example in the Victoria & Albert Museum, which was apparently taken during the siege of Seringapatam. That example contains an inscription which states that the helmet was dipped in water from the holy well of Zamzam in Mecca, rendering it impervious to attacks (V & A acc. no. 3517:1to:6/(IS), published in Moeinuddin, Mohammed, Sunset at Sriringapatam. After the Death of Tipu Sultan, Hyderabad, 2000, p.99). Here, alongside the invocations of Allah and the Prophet Muhammad are the names of 'Ali, Muhammad's son-in-law and fourth Rightly-Guided Caliph, Fatima, the wife of 'Ali and daughter of Muhammad, and Hasan and Husayn, the sons of Ali and Fatima. These are members of the Ahl al-Bayt, revered by Sunni and Shia alike as members of the family of the Prophet. Tipu himself was "a Sunni Muslim with strong leanings towards Shi'ism...also deeply permeated by Sufism, the mystical mode of Islam" (Stronge, Susan, Tipu's Tiger, 2009, p.29). The presence here of these names indicates that they would have served an apotropaic function, protecting the wearer in the same way as the inscriptions on the sword hilt in this sale (lot 162). 

For a discussion of arms and armour of this type, see H. Russell Robinson, Oriental Armour, London, 1967, pp. 99-101, pl. XVIII, figs A and B. 

A fine and exceptionally rare metal-thread embroidered quilted velvet Quirass (Peti), Mysore, late 18th Century

A fine and exceptionally rare metal-thread embroidered quilted velvet Quirass (Peti), Mysore, late 18th CenturyEstimate £25,000 - 35,000 (€34,000 - 48,000)Photo: Bonhams.

designed to cover the torso, neck and shoulders, formed of several layers of fabric lined in striped silk, the main panel of rectangular shape, formed of quilted yellow velvet, closed with hidden rings and lacing, the neck-guard with a hide core, the shoulder-guards widening at the top, the whole decorated en suite with panels of blue velvet containing floral motifs in red velvet, gold orris thread and sequins, the borders with yellow, red, and blue velvet piping - 53.3 cm. diam.

ProvenanceRobin Wigington collection, the Arms and Armour Museum, Stratford-upon-Avon;
Private collection, acquired Sotheby's, The Tipu Sultan Sale, 25th May 2005, lot 25.

NoteThis rare example of a quilted quirass from 18th Century Mysore is remarkable for its good state of preservation. The thick quilting of garments such as these was used to protect Mysorean soldiers going into battle, apparently with a great degree of success. Benjamin Sydenham, an aide-de-camp to Richard Wellesley, stated that "it is perfectly certain that that these stuff and quilted jackets were frequently found to resist the sabres of even European Cavalry" (quoted in Moienuddin, Mohammed, Sunset at Srirangapatam. After the Death of Tipu Sultan, Hyderabad, 2000, p. 92). A cuirass of similar design, albeit far less elaborately decorated and in green velvet rather than blue, was captured at the Fall of Seringapatam and is now in the Victoria & Albert Museum, London (acc. no. 3517:1to:6/(IS)) Two other "suits of quilted crimson velvet embroidered with gold" said to belong to Tipu himself are also in the Royal Collection at Windsor Palace (Egerton, Earl Wilbraham (Lord Egerton of Tatton), Indian and Oriental Arms and Armour, Mineola, 2002, p.124)

A rare and historically important carved wood Tiger Paw Foot from the Throne of Tipu Sultan, Seringapatam, 1787-93

A rare and historically important carved wood Tiger Paw Foot from the Throne of Tipu Sultan, Seringapatam, 1787-93Estimate £15,000 - 20,000 (€20,000 - 27,000)Photo: Bonhams.

the five-clawed tiger foot of solid hardwood carved in naturalistic fashion, gold sheet overlay now missing, later silver plaque attached reading 'Capture of Seringapatam/4th May 1799/ Foot of the tiger which supported the platform on which stood/ Tipu Sultan's throne' 
19 cm. max.

Provenance: Robin Wigington collection, the Arms and Armour Museum, Stratford-upon-Avon;
Private Collection, acquired Sotheby's, The Tipu Sultan Sale, 25th April 2015, lot 19.

ExhibitedTigers around the Throne. The Court of Tipu Sultan (1750-99), Zamana Gallery, London, 2nd August - 14th October 1990.

PublishedBuddle, Anne, Tigers around the Throne. The Court of Tipu Sultan (1750-99), Zamana Gallery, London, 1990, no. 40.

NotesThis carved wooden foot is one of the few surviving pieces of the legendary 'Tiger Throne' of Tipu Sultan. Based on contemporary European and Mysorean reports, the throne was an octagonal platform with a central chhatri (parasol) topped by a bejewelled huma bird (a mythical bird of good fortune). The platform was surmounted by eight tiger finials and raised on eight legs, as well as the body of a lifelike tiger. The entire body was, according to Tipu's court historian Mir Husayn Ali Kirmani, "made of heavy blackwood entirely covered with a coat of the purest sheet of gold." It is evident, then, that the current object was stripped of its gold covering, leaving only the carved wood beneath. The silver plaque attached to it provides contemporary documentary evidence that this foot was indeed taken from the throne of Tipu Sultan.

The throne was apparently commissioned by Tipu in 1787 or 1788, following his successful embassy to the Sublime Porte (Kirmani, Mir Hussain Ali Khan, transl. G. Miles, The History of the Reign of Tipu Sultan being a continuation of The Neshan Hyduri, London, 1864, p. 145), but he was unable to ceremonially take his place upon it owing to the deafeat at Travancore in 1789 and the unsuccessful Third Anglo-Mysore War of 1789-1792. He took a vow not to sit on it until he had reversed the losses of the Treaty of Seringapatam, but his defeat at the hands of the British in 1799 prevented him from ever doing so (see Forrest, Denys, Tiger of Mysore. The Life and Death of Tipu Sultan, London 1970, p.215; Moienuddin, Mohammed, Sunset at Srirangapatam. After the Death of Tipu Sultan, Hyderabad, 2000, pp. 45-53).  

Arthur Wellesley, the future Duke of Wellington, wrote to the Court of Directors of the East India Company in January 1800 that: "It would have given me pleasure to have been able to send the whole throne entire to England but the indiscreet zeal of the prize agents of the army had broken that proud monument of the Sultan's arrogance into fragments before I had been apprised even of the existence of such a trophy" (quoted in Buddle et al 1999, p.25). Although the destruction of the throne was a terrible act of vandalism, a number of pieces still survive. Only four finials are known, one in the Clive Collection at Powis Castle; a second, current whereabouts unknown; the Hope-Wallace finial sold through these rooms (Bonhams, Islamic and Indian Art, 2nd April 2009, lot 212); and the Bowser finial, also sold through these rooms (Bonhams, Islamic and Indian Art, 7th October 2010, lot 370. The central tiger's head and huma bird are in the Royal Collection (Buddle 1990, pp. 38-39; Stronge, Susan, Tipu's Tigers, London, 2009, pp. 18-19). A gold foot from the throne is also said to have been adapted as a snuff-box. 

A Mughal gem-set jade Plaque with note stating found with the body of Tipu Sultan in 1799, India, 18th Century

A Mughal gem-set jade Plaque with note stating found with the body of Tipu Sultan in 1799, India, 18th CenturyEstimate £15,000 - 20,000 (€20,000 - 27,000)Photo: Bonhams.

of oval form, set with foiled rubies and emeralds in gold in the form of a floral spray, with gold surround, converted into a brooch in the 19th Century, in original leather lined fitted case from Rowlands and Frazer, Jewellers, 146 Regent Street, London; 3.7 cm high; 4.1 cm. wide

ProvenanceRowlands and Frazer, 146 Regent Street, London; 
Miss Maud Odda, Barons, Watford by 1890, and thence by descent;
Spink and Son, London, 1992.

Published and ExhibitedSpink and Son, Indian and Islamic Works of Art, 22nd April to 22nd May 1992, p. 58, cat. no. 47.

A gold damascened steel Hilt inscribed with the name of Haydar 'Ali, Southern India, late 18th Century

A gold damascened steel Hilt inscribed with the name of Haydar 'Ali, Southern India, late 18th CenturyEstimate £12,000 - 15,000 (€16,000 - 20,000)Photo: Bonhams.

of typical talwar hilt design, a disc-shaped flange surrounding the pommel, the grip widening at the middle, a slender crossguard with thin knuckle-guard, inlaid all over with bubri patterns and inscriptions consisting of Qur'anic verses, prayers, and a couplet in Persian - 18.4 cm. high

ProvenanceRobin Wigington collection, the Arms and Armour Museum, Stratford-upon-Avon;
Private collection, acquired Sotheby's, The Tipu Sultan Sale, 25th May 2005, lot 5.  

PublishedWigington, Robin, "A Calligraphic Sword Hilt from the Armoury of Tipu Sultan", The Journal of the Arms and Armour Society, vol. XII, No. 5, March 1988.

NoteInscriptions:
Qur'an,Surat al-Saff (lxi), verse 13, twice, 'And [you will obtain] another [favour] that you love - victory from Allah and an imminent conquest; and give good tidings to the believers; 
Surat Yusuf (xii), verse 64, twice, 'He said, "Should I entrust you with him except [under coercion] as I entrusted you with his brother before? But Allah is the best guardian, and He is the most merciful of the merciful"'; and verse 21, once, 'And the one from Egypt who bought him said to his wife, "Make his residence comfortable. Perhaps he will benefit us, or we will adopt him as a son". And thus, We established Joseph in the land that We might teach him the interpretation of events. And Allah is predominant over His affair, but most of the people do not know.'
Surat al-An'am (vi), verse 45, once, 'So the people that committed wrong were eliminated. And praise to Allah , Lord of the worlds'; Surat al-Baqara (ii), verse 286, once 'Allah does not charge a soul except [with that within] its capacity. It will have [the consequence of] what [good] it has gained, and it will bear [the consequence of] what [evil] it has earned. "Our Lord, do not impose blame upon us if we have forgotten or erred. Our Lord, and lay not upon us a burden like that which You laid upon those before us. Our Lord, and burden us not with that which we have no ability to bear. And pardon us; and forgive us; and have mercy upon us. You are our protector, so give us victory over the disbelieving people"'. 
Surat Al Imran (iii), verse 161, once, 'It is not [attributable] to any prophet that he would act unfaithfully [in regard to war booty]. And whoever betrays, [taking unlawfully], will come with what he took on the Day of Resurrection. Then will every soul be [fully] compensated for what it earned, and they will not be wronged'; 
Surat al-Fath (xlviii), verse 1, once, 'Indeed, We have given you, [O Muhammad], a clear conquest';and verse 3, 'And [that] Allah may aid you with a mighty victory.' 

Prayers: Ya Haydar ya safdar ya nasir ya Muhammad, 'O Lion, O Breaker of Ranks, O Helper, O Muhammad';
Wa a'iff 'anna wa ighfir lana wa irhimna, 'Forgive us and absolve us and have mercy upon us';
Allahumma nassir min nasr din Muhammad wa ja'alna minhum, 'God aid those who help the faith of Muhammad and make us among them';
Allahumma ukhdhil min khudhl din Muhammad wa la taj'alna minhum, 'God abandon those who abandon the faith of Muhammad and make us not among them'. 

Couplet: Shod barq-e jan-e kafaran tigh-e zafar bonyad-e man/Sultan-e din Haydar bovad ruz-e fath bar emdad-e man, 'My sword of triumphant essence became the lightning for the souls of the faithless/ The Sultan of Faith Haydar would aid me on the day of victory'. 

A hilt with 'Persian inscriptions' inlaid in gold, apparently containing some of the asma' al-husna' (the 99 Names of Allah) as well as tiger-stripes, is reported as 'probably worn by Tipu' (Egerton, Earl Wilbraham (Lord Egerton of Tatton), Indian and Oriental Arms and Armour, Mineola, 2002, p.123). It is very likely that such hilts were credited with apotropaic or protective qualities for the warrior, and the same can be said for the mixture of Qur'anic quotations and prayers which are found on the present hilt. As a Muslim ruling class, albeit of a predominantly Hindu kingdom, Tipu Sultan and his officers would have appreciated the symbolism of such inscriptions upon their weaponry. The hilt of the 'Bedchamber Sword' of Tipu Sultan bears the names of God as well as calling upon His powers (Dix, Noonan and Webb, The Baird Jewels and Archive, 19th September 2003, p.80). Also comparable are the inscriptions on the hilts, also considered to be part of Tipu's private collection, which are now in the Clive Collection, Powis Castle (Archer, Mildred, Rowell, Christopher and Skelton, Robert, eds., Treasures from India. The Clive Collection at Powis Castle, National Trust, 1987, cat. nos. 33-35). However, this hilt does not bear the distinctive tiger-mask decoration seen on other examples which are associated with him.

A rare pair of fine metal-thread embroidered Arm Guards, Mysore, late 18th Century

A rare pair of fine metal-thread embroidered Arm Guards, Mysore, late 18th CenturyEstimate £10,000 - 15,000 (€14,000 - 20,000)Photo: Bonhams.

the matching arm guards extending from hand to elbow, the facing of bright red velvet embroidered with gold thread and edged with blue velvet, the main field sewn throughout with sequins, on brown padded velvet lining, the hand-guard with flower motif surrounded by a geometric design, the main panel with four pairs of addorsed bubri stripes in gold and blue silk surmounted by a floral motif, the borders of red velvet embroidered with a repeating gold vegetal motif, the inner-guards each closed with a fabric hinge - each 45.4 cm. long(2)

ProvenanceRobin Wigington collection, the Arms and Armour Museum, Stratford-upon-Avon;
Private collection, acquired Sotheby's, The Tipu Sultan Sale, 25th April 2005, lot 23.

NoteThese arm guards are comparable to those in lot 150, and would similarly have been intended for the elite of Mysorean society.

A rare bronze Hilt with tiger head Pommel for a Child's Sword, probably a prince, Mysore, circa 1790-95

A rare bronze Hilt with tiger head Pommel for a Child's Sword, probably a prince, Mysore, circa 1790-95Estimate £3,000 - 5,000 (€4,100 - 6,800)Photo: Bonhams.

cast in one piece, the pommel in the form of a snarling tiger's head in the round, punched and matted decoration, the ears erect, the eyes inset with rubies, the teeth still with original silvering, the faceted grip shaped for the hand and decorated with bubri pattern, the short quillons with bulbous terminals, the narrow langets pierced for a later blade to be fitted, traces of original gilding throughout - 14.5 cm. high

Provenance: Robin Wigington collection, the Arms and Armour Museum, Stratford-upon-Avon;
Private collection, acquired Sotheby's, The Tipu Sultan Sale, 25th May 2005, lot 2.

NoteThe very small size of this hilt suggests that it was made to fit a child's hand, and the relative luxury of the work, employing gemstones as well as gilding and silvering, suggests that such a child would have been one of Tipu's sons.

A fine and rare doucai 'Peaches and Lotus' bowl, Mark and period of Yongzheng

A fine and rare doucai 'Peaches and Lotus' bowl, Mark and period of Yongzheng

A fine and rare doucai 'Peaches and Lotus' bowl, Mark and period of Yongzheng (1)

A fine and rare doucai 'Peaches and Lotus' bowl, Mark and period of Yongzheng (detail)

A fine and rare doucai 'Peaches and Lotus' bowl, Mark and period of Yongzheng (2)

A fine and rare doucai 'Peaches and Lotus' bowl, Mark and period of YongzhengEstimate 400,000 — 600,000 HKD (45,606 - 68,410 EUR). Photo Sotheby's

the deep rounded sides resting on a slightly tapered foot, the exterior exquisitely decorated in multi-coloured enamels with a leafy scroll painted in shades of green issuing gnarled purple twigs bearing large lotus blossoms and double-peaches, above a vividly painted upright petal lappet bordering the base, all between two bands of leafy scrolls alternating with blue bats with outstretched wings encircling the rim and the foot, the interior centred with a medallion enclosing a beribboned stylised wan symbol wreathed in leaves and peaches, all within a double-line border repeated at the rim, the base inscribed in underglaze blue with a six-character reign mark within a double-circle - 14.3 cm., 5 5/8  in.

ProvenanceAn old Japanese collection.

NotesThis is an extremely rare Yongzheng interpretation of a design more commonly found in the Kangxi period. Only two other examples, both of identical size, form and decoration appear to be recorded: the first, originally in the collection of Dr Robert Barron, New Orleans and now in the Meiyintang collection, illustrated by Regina Krahl, Chinese Ceramics from the Meiyingtang Collection, London, vol. 4, pt. II, London, 2010, no. 1746, the second, from the collection of Dr Richard and Mrs Mary Eckhardt, originally acquired in Japan between 1947-52, and sold in our New York rooms, 20th March 2012, lot 100. For the Kangxi prototype, see the pair sold in these rooms, 27th October 1992, lot 167 and again 8th October 2014, lot 3632, illustrated on the cover. 

Both Kangxi and Yongzheng examples are characterised by the elegant and unusual design of a narrow band depicted as though a wreath has been wrapped around the bowl. Both exude refinement of composition,  accentuated by the variation of colours and delicacy of the enamelling which illustrate carefully observed details: the ripeness of the peaches is finely captured through pointillist iron-red dots and the blossoms are rendered both in full bloom with darker petal tips and as buds about to open. The Kangxi example differs from the Yongzheng bowl in having a swastika border at the rim in underglaze-blue and lacks the band of bats amidst foliage encircling the rim and foot. 

Although the decoration on these bowls does not closely follow a specific Chenghua design, it nevertheless takes its inspiration from the Chenghua period (1465-87) through the choice of the doucai technique and the painting style. Compare, for example, the execution of the leafy branch and manner in which the fruit has been painted in yellow and iron-red on a Chenghua mark and period bowl, excavated from the waste heaps of the Ming Imperial Kilns from Zhushan, Jingdezhen, included in the exhibition A Legacy of Chenghua, The Tsui Museum of Art, Hong Kong, 1993, cat. no. C115. The continuous band of a fruiting and flowering tree is found on a Chenghua stemcup, which depicts two boughs of fruiting apple branches amongst which sit a pair of birds, such as one in the National Palace Museum, Taipei, included in the Special Exhibition of Ch’eng-hua Porcelain Ware, National Palace Museum, Taipei, 2003, cat. no. 170. 

Sotheby's. Yongzheng – The Age of Harmony and Integrity, Hong Kong, 07 avr. 2015

An extremely rare and superbly enamelled pair of Famille-Rose 'Peach' bowls, Marks and period of Yongzheng

An extremely rare and superbly enamelled pair of Famille-Rose 'Peach' bowls, Marks and period of Yongzheng

An extremely rare and superbly enamelled pair of Famille-Rose 'Peach' bowls, Marks and period of Yongzheng (1)

An extremely rare and superbly enamelled pair of Famille-Rose 'Peach' bowls, Marks and period of Yongzheng (2)

An extremely rare and superbly enamelled pair of Famille-Rose 'Peach' bowls, Marks and period of Yongzheng (4)

An extremely rare and superbly enamelled pair of Famille-Rose 'Peach' bowls, Marks and period of Yongzheng (6)

An extremely rare and superbly enamelled pair of Famille-Rose 'Peach' bowls, Marks and period of Yongzheng (3)

An extremely rare and superbly enamelled pair of Famille-Rose 'Peach' bowls, Marks and period of Yongzheng (5)

An extremely rare and superbly enamelled pair of Famille-Rose 'Peach' bowls, Marks and period of Yongzheng (detail)

An extremely rare and superbly enamelled pair of Famille-Rose 'Peach' bowls, Marks and period of YongzhengEstimate 40,000,000 — 60,000,000 HKD (4,560,634 - 6,840,951 EUR). Photo Sotheby's

each exquisitely potted with deep rounded sides resting on a short foot, superbly enamelled in vivid tones of rose pink, shades of green, yellow, iron-red, brown and black with two varieties of flowering and fruiting peach branches issuing from the foot and extending across the exterior and over the rim onto the interior, one branch with a brownish-black bark and bearing white double blossoms, the other with a brown bark and issuing five-petalled rose-pink blossoms, both with large ripe fruit delicately coloured in shaded tones of yellowish-green to subtle raspberry-pink, depicted in iron-red with two bats on the exterior and three on the interior forming the wufu, the base inscribed in underglaze blue with a six-character reign mark within a double-circle - 14.3 cm., 5 5/8  in.

ProvenanceAn old Hong Kong collection, prior to 1982, separated in 1988.
One bowl:
Sotheby's Hong Kong, 14th November 1989, lot 315.
Collection of the Tsui Museum of Art, Hong Kong.
Christie's Hong Kong, 26th April 1999, lot 539. 
Sotheby's London, 16th May 2007, lot 104.

ExhibitedOne bowl:
The Tsui Museum of Art, Hong Kong, 1991, pl. 119 (left).
The Tsui Museum of Art. Chinese Ceramics IV: Qing Dynasty, Hong Kong, 1995, cat. no. 155 (left).

Note:

Making the Yongzheng Emperor Immortal
Li Baoping

Painted with auspicious symbols rooted in China’s antiquity and coveted by the Yongzheng Emperor (r. 1723-35), created by the imperial kilns to celebrate an imperial birthday, in a palette inspired by Jesuit technology, this extremely rare and immensely elegant pair of peach bowls is deeply anchored in Chinese history and represents a zenith of aesthetic and technological achievement of court art in China.

The Yongzheng Emperor was a firm believer in portents of good fortune. Having ascended the throne under somewhat nebulous circumstances, the legality of his succession was persistently questioned, which made him more receptive than any other Qing (1644-1911) emperor for auspicious symbolism. Many aspects of the design on these exquisite bowls are very auspicious and suggest that they may have been intended to celebrate an imperial birthday. 

Peaches are perhaps China's most auspicious fruit, having a long tradition as omens of longevity and harbingers of happiness. Six is a propitious number, and flowering peach branches are believed to ward off evil. The poet Tao Qian (365-427) tells of a fisherman who, when following the source of a stream in a peach orchard – 'Peach Blossom Spring' – through a crevice in a rock, discovered a paradisiacal world. A peach orchard is also the setting for the oath of brotherhood sworn by the three main protagonists of the novel Romance of the Three Kingdoms, including the Han dynasty (206 BC – AD 220) general Guan Yu who was deified and worshipped as Emperor Guan or God of War for near two millennia. The ‘peaches of immortality’, which are said to grow in the garden of Xi Wang Mu, the Queen Mother of the West, flower only once every three thousand years and to take three thousand years to bear fruit and another three thousand years to ripen, and are then offered in a banquet to the immortals. Dongfang Shuo, a witty and clever Han dynasty scholar, who became the hero of many legends, is reported to have stolen peaches of immortality and thus to have become immortal. And the same feat is told of the cunning Monkey King Sun Wukong, hero of the novel Journey to the West, who subsequently was recruited by Guanyin (Bodhisattva of Compassion) to accompany the Tang dynasty (618-907) monk Xuanzang on his trip to India to obtain Buddhist sutras. 

The five red bats painted on the bowls are among the most popular themes in Chinese decorative arts. Red bats provide a rebus or visual pun for vast good fortune, and five bats provide a rebus for wu fu, the Five Blessings of longevity, health, wealth, love of virtue and a good end to life. Those bats painted upside down provide a further rebus, since the word for ‘upside down’, dao, is pronounced similarly to the word for ‘arriving’, and thus an upside-down bat signifies 'happiness is arriving'. 

The Yongzheng Emperor was clearly attached to these stories, as he had himself painted as the recipient of such good luck in an album leaf that shows him in possession of a peach of immortality, with a monkey hanging from a nearby tree (fig. 1), while in another leaf from the same album he is depicted gazing at a water fall with a bat flying overhead. 

Anonymous, A Life Portrait of the Yongzheng Emperor, colour on silk, album of 13 leaves, Qing dynasty, Yongzheng period, Palace Museum, Beijing

Anonymous, A Life Portrait of the Yongzheng Emperor, colour on silk, album of 13 leaves, Qing dynasty, Yongzheng period, Palace Museum, Beijing. After: The Complete Collection of Treasures of the Palace Museum:Paintings by the Court Artists of the Qing Court, Hong Kong, 1996, pl. 18.

While he had peaches and bats represented in all possible media, the peach design was perhaps best suited to the newly developed fencai (famille-rose) palette for porcelain with its pastel shades of pink, yellow and green. It began to be used, however, in the imperial palace workshops in the Forbidden City, on enamelled metal vessels. A fruiting and flowering peach tree had already been used once in the Kangxi period (1662-1722) to decorate a copper-bodied vase (fig. 2).

Falangcai ‘peach-and-bat’ copper vase, Qing dynasty, Kangxi period, Palace Museum, Beijing

Falangcai ‘peach-and-bat’ copper vase, Qing dynasty, Kangxi period, Palace Museum, Beijing. After: China. The Three Emperors 1662-1795, Royal Academy of Arts, London, 2005-6, cat. no. 295.

In the Yongzheng period a copper cup and saucer were enamelled in the imperial Enamelling Workshops with peach-and-bat designs related to those on the present bowls (fig. 3), and an enamelled copper water pot was formed as a peach branch with two fruit and painted with bats included in China. The Three Emperors 1662-1795, Royal Academy of Arts, London, 2005-6, cat. no. 295.

Gilt copper cup and saucer with painted enamel rendering of the happiness and longevity motif, Qing dynasty, Yongzheng mark and period, National Palace Museum, Taipei © The Collection of National Palace Museum

Gilt copper cup and saucer with painted enamel rendering of the happiness and longevity motif, Qing dynasty, Yongzheng mark and period, National Palace Museum, Taipei © The Collection of National Palace Museum

The transfer of the motif onto porcelain probably took place under the auspices of Tang Ying (AD 1682-1756), the Yongzheng Emperor's trusted official and the greatest porcelain superintendent in Chinese history. The soft colouration of fruiting and flowering peach branches made this design ideal to show off the new famille-rose palette. It was inspired by enamels introduced to China by Jesuit missionaries who arrived at the imperial court during the late Kangxi period and adapted at Jingdezhen in the years preceding the Yongzheng reign. The wide range of pastel shades of famille-rose from a fresh green over an opaque white to a pale rosé tone and eventually a deep pink was never otherwise displayed more impressively. It was only in the Yongzheng period that the porcelain painters could begin painting nature scenes in naturalistic – if idealized – colours, as perfectly demonstrated by the present pair of bowls. 

The peach-and-bat design was also used for enamelling porcelains at the imperial workshops in the Forbidden City in Beijing. Compare a pair of Yongzheng falangcai porcelain bowls in the National Palace Museum, Taipei, also painted with peach trees and five bats, but in a less pronounced design (fig. 4). 

Falangcai ‘peach-and-bat’ bowl, Qing dynasty, Yongzheng period © The Collection of National Palace Museum

Falangcai ‘peach-and-bat’ bowl, Qing dynasty, Yongzheng period © The Collection of National Palace Museum

A feature of these bowls favoured by the Yongzheng Emperor and new to his reign period, but unique to the imperial porcelain workshops at Jingdezhen, was the difficult and sophisticated technique of painting branches that flow over the rim, an artistic device referred to as changzhi (long branch), a homophone of the phrase “Eternal Governance”. A particular request by the Yongzheng Emperor preserved in the records of the Zaobanchu, the workshops of the Imperial Household Department, reflects his interest in the ‘long branch’ design: “19th day, 4th month, Yongzheng 9th year (1731)…His Majesty ordered to take glazed and unglazed porcelain and paint on it the enamelled designs of Everlasting Tranquillity and Eternal Governance…” (Feng Xianming, Annotated Collection of Historical Documents on Ancient Chinese Ceramics, Taipei, 2000, p. 222). 

With such a wealth of symbolic meaning dear to the Emperor, these bowls with the peach and bat combination were probably produced for an imperial birthday. This view is supported by two Yongzheng court paintings: a landscape by Chen Mei (1694?-1745) with a large number of bats in the sky, inscribed Ten Thousand Blessings (bats) to the Emperor and presented to the Yongzheng Emperor on his birthday in the 4th year of his reign (1726) (China. The Three Emperors 1662-1795op.cit., cat. no. 270); and another, by court artist Jin Jie (fl. 18th century), depicting three elderly men in a landscape with red bats, titledFlying Bats Filling the Sky (i.e. Infinite Blessings) (fig. 5). 

Jin Jie, Flying Bats Filling the Sky, colour on silk, album, Qing dynasty, Yongzheng period © The Collection of National Palace Museum

Jin Jie, Flying Bats Filling the Sky, colour on silk, album, Qing dynasty, Yongzheng period © The Collection of National Palace Museum

 Porcelain vessels produced for the occasion of celebrating imperial birthdays were made in very small numbers. Although the peach-and-bat design on the present bowls represents one of the best-known Yongzheng porcelain patterns, this is due more to its endearing character than a profusion of extant examples. Comparable bowls of the Yongzheng reign, although frequently illustrated, are surprisingly rare. Altogether only about five pairs of peach bowls of Yongzheng mark and period painted with this ‘long branch’ or ‘Eternal Governance’ design, appear to be recorded. 

A pair formerly in the Eisei Bunko, Tokyo, an art collection with its origins in the Nanboku-cho period (1336-92) formed by the Hosokawa family, one of the top daimyo clans in Japan, is now separated: one bowl entered the Meiyintang collection and was sold in these rooms on 5th October 2011, lot 16, the other, still in the Eisei Bunko today, is illustrated in Sekai toji zenshu/Ceramic art of the world, vol. 12:, Tokyo, 1956, col. pl. 11. Another pair in the Baur collection, Geneva, is illustrated in John Ayers, The Baur Collection Geneva: Chinese Ceramics, Geneva, 1968-74, vol. 4, nos. A 594 and 595. A pair from the collections of Chen Rentao, Paul and Helen Bernat and T. Endo was sold in these rooms 15th November 1988, lot 44, and 29th April 1997, lot 401, and at Christie's Hong Kong, 29th May 2007, lot 1374, and is illustrated in Sotheby's. Thirty Years in Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 2003, pl. 326. This pair is now also separated and one was included in the Fiftieth Anniversary Exhibition: Twelve Chinese Masterworks, Eskenazi, London, 2010, cat. no. 11, while the other is in a private collection in Taiwan. Another pair was sold at Yamanaka & Co., London, 1938, and was included in their catalogue Chinese Ceramic Art, Bronze, Jade etc., no. 116, pl. 12 (illustrating one of the pair). Also known is one bowl from the Avery Brundage collection, in the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, published in Terese Tse Bartholomew, Hidden Meanings in Chinese Art, Asian Art Museum, San Francisco, 2006, page 204, number 7.44.1. 

One other related pair of different proportions, from the Allen J. Mercher and John M. Crawford, Jr. collections, was sold at Parke-Bernet, New York, 10th October 1957, lot 261, and in these rooms, 24th May 1978, lot 252. The design continued to be produced for the Qianlong Emperor, and a bowl of Qianlong mark and period is published in Soame Jenyns, Later Chinese Porcelain: The Ch'ing Dynasty (1644-1912), London, 1951, pl. LVI, fig. 2. 

Famille-rose enamelled ‘peach’ vase, Qing dynasty, Yongzheng mark and period

Famille-rose enamelled ‘Peach’ vase, Qing dynasty, Yongzheng mark and period. The Collections of Dr. Alice Cheng and Hon. Ogden R. Reid. Sotheby’s Hong Kong, 7th May 2002, lot 532. The Collection of Shanghai Museum.

The peach design is also seen on other porcelain vessels of the Yongzheng period, in very small numbers as well. Examples include the famous vase from the collection of the Hon. Ogden R. Reid, sold in these rooms, 7th May 2002, lot 532 and donated in 2004 to the Shanghai Museum by Dr. Alice Cheng (fig. 6); a covered box formerly in the Van Slyke and Meiyintang collections, sold in these rooms 8th April 2013, lot 3036; large dishes including one from the collection of J. Pierpont Morgan, sold in these rooms, 29th April 1997, lot 400, and one in the Palace Museum, Beijing, see China: The Three Emperors, op.cit., cat. no. 181. A group of smaller dishes is discussed in An Exhibition of Important Chinese Ceramics from the Robert Chang Collection, London, 1993, cat. no. 92; see also an example in the British Museum, London, illustrated in Oriental Ceramics, The World's Great Collections, vol. 5, New York, 1981, col. pl. 67; and another dish illustrated in Denise Patry Leidy, Treasures of Asian Art. The Asia Society’s Mr. and Mrs. John D. Rockefeller 3rd Collection, New York, 1994, pl. 198. Also known are peach vases in tianqiuping globular form, such as a piece in the Palace Museum, Beijing, in Porcelains from the Qing Dynasty Imperial Kilns in the Palace Museum Collection, Beijing, 2005, vol. 1, part 2, pl. 76; and another exhibited in The Barbara Hutton Collection of Chinese Porcelain, Honolulu Academy of Arts, Honolulu, 1956-7, cat. pl. XV, and sold in our London rooms, 6th July 1971, lot 259, and later in these rooms, 30th April 1996, lot 498. 

Sotheby's. Yongzheng – The Age of Harmony and Integrity, Hong Kong, 07 avr. 2015



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