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Paul Newman, 1964. Gelatin silver print, printed 2009, 24 x 16 inches / 61 x 40.6 cm. Courtesy Tony Shafrazi Gallery, New York.

NEW YORK, NY.- "Dennis Hopper: Signs of the Times," on view at Tony Shafrazi Gallery through October 24, includes a vast selection of the artist's iconic 1960s photographs, twelve enormous and never-seen-before "billboard paintings," and select video excerpts from Hopper's extensive body of work as an actor and director in film and television.

Having worked on this ambitious project for eighteen years, from more than ten thousand photographs, a total of four hundred images have been selected that represent the most impressive and thorough body of work by Dennis Hopper, half of which have not been published before. The book is edited with an introductory essay by Tony Shafrazi, with additional fully illustrated brilliant texts by the legendary West Coast art pioneer Walter Hopps. An extensive biography by Jessica Hundley incorporates many excerpts from interviews with prominent artists and friends conducted by Victor Bockris, and in addition includes a complete illustrated filmography.

A legendary icon at the epicenter of many decades of exciting innovation and cultural upheaval, Hopper documented the likes of Ike and Tina Turner, Phil Spector, Neil Young, Crosby Stills and Nash, Paul Newman, Ed Ruscha, Andy Warhol, Martin Luther King and the civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama.

In 1960-67, before the making of the American classic Easy Rider, Dennis Hopper shot a selection of groundbreaking images that tell a most animated and remarkable history of art, artist, places and events of that time. What is most extraordinary and unique about these photographs is not only the crisp and wonderful eye and the "cinematic image", but the celebration of the moment, always crazy, cool, wild and funny, infused with magic and life, the result of the subject interacting with Dennis Hopper.

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Installation view. Dennis Hopper: Signs of the Times through October 24, 2008 at Tony Shafrazi Gallery, New York