robe_de_cour_en_gaze_bleue_brodee_au_point_compte_chaofu_chine_dynasti_d5521926h

Robe de cour en gaze bleue brodée au point compté, chaofu. Chine, Dynastie Qing, XIXème siècle Christie's Images Ltd 2012

De couleur bleue, à décor brodé en fils or, argent et polychromes, sur la poitrine et le dos d'un grand dragon, de chauve-souris, et Emblèmes  bouddhiques, parmi les nuages au-dessus des flots, la ceinture et la partie inférieure de la robe ornées de dragons affrontés, la jupe également rehaussée de médaillons ; usures. Hauteur: circa 144 cm. (56¾ in.). Estimate €10,000 - €15,000.. Price Realised €46,600

清十九世紀 石青地納紗繡雲蝠金龍八吉祥朝袍A BLUE SUMMER GAUZE COURT ROBE WORKED IN COUNTED STITCH EMBROIDERY, CHAOFUCHINA, QING DYNASTY, 19TH CENTURY

ProvenanceFrom a French private collection acquired before 1925 and then by descent to the present owner.

NotesManchu men's formal attire, chaofu or robes of state, were worn for the most important court functions by the emperor, princes, nobles, civil and military high ranking officials. The events included the Grand Audiences held in the Forbidden City such as the enthronement of the emperor, receiving felicitations from officials, imperial weddings, and the great ritual sacrifices. The two-part construction of the robe, with pleated skirt attached to the upper body, derived from Ming-style court dress, which was adapted by the Manchu who altered the full sleeves to tapered sleeves and narrow cuffs, symbolic of their original nomadic lifestyle. At the Qing court the colour blue had ritual significance. It was the colour associated with the rites at the Altar of Heaven, located south of the Forbidden City where the Emperor offered sacrifices at the winter solstice and also prayed for rain during the summer months. The colbalt-blue was designated for the robes of Manchu princes from the first through the fourth rank. Other nobles and high-ranking officials, who were entitled to attend the most formal of state functions where chaofu were required, wore dark blue or black. 

 

Christie's. Art d'Asie. 14 December 2011. Paris www.christies.com