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A Fine Guan-Type Glazed Compressed Globular Vase, Qianlong six-character seal mark and of the period (1736-1795). Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2013

The vase is finely potted with a compressed globular body supported on a splayed foot, rising to a tubular neck. It is covered overall with a pale grey glaze suffused with black 'iron wire' crackle, connected with some pale 'golden thread' crackle. The foot ring is covered with a chocolate-brown dressing. 8 7/8 in. (22.5 cm.) high. Estimate $232,874 - $323,436

1Notes: The present vase with its lustrous glaze and well-balanced shape is modelled after Guan vessels of the Southern Song dynasty, such as the compressed globular Guan vase of similar size and shape, but with a longer and wider neck and glaze of glossier texture, in the British Museum Collection illustrated in Oriental Ceramics, The World's Great Collections, vol. 5, 1981, col. pl. 24.

Archaistic vessels imitating the revered Song Guan wares were produced in the Imperial kilns as early as the Ming dynasty, with the best examples made during the Xuande and Chenghua reigns. One example is a Chenghua-marked Guan-type vase, also of compressed globular form but with two loop handles in the form of masks, excavated from the Chenghua stratum in Jingdezhen and illustrated in Yuan's and Ming's Imperial Porcelains Unearthed from Jingdezhen, Beijing, 1999, no. 359. The popularity of these wares continued throughout the Qing dynasty, with their quality reaching an unprecedented level of refinement during the Yongzheng and Qianlong periods, which is well reflected in the present vase.

Christies. IN PURSUIT OF REFINEMENT - A LEGACY OF THE YC CHEN COLLECTION. 29 May 2013. Convention Hall