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Burgonet, ca. 1550–55, Italian, Milan. Embossed, etched, and partly gilt steel. Weight, 4 lb. 9 oz. (2069.5 g) Height, 15 1/2 in. (39.37 cm) Height of comb, 2 1/2 in. (6.35 cm) Greatest width, 9 in. (22.86 cm) © 2000–2013 The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Allegorical figures of Fame and Victory are embossed on the sides of the bowl. The helmet was originally fitted with a pivoting visor and plates at the nape.

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Filippo Negroli (Italian, Milan, ca. 1510–1579), Burgonet, dated 1543, Italian, Milan. Embossed steel damascened with gold. Weight, 4 lb. 2 oz. (1871 g) Height, 9 1/2 in. (24.13 cm) Greatest Width, 7 5/16 in. (18.57 cm) © 2000–2013 The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

This masterpiece of Renaissance metalwork is signed on the browplate by Filippo Negroli, whose embossed armor was praised by sixteenth-century writers as "miraculous" and deserving "immortal merit." Formed of one plate of steel and patinated to look like bronze, the bowl is raised in high relief with motifs inspired by classical art. The graceful mermaidlike siren forming the helmet's comb holds a grimacing head of Medusa by the hair. The sides of the helmet are covered with acanthus scrolls inhabited by putti, a motif ultimately derived from ancient Roman sculpture and wall paintings.

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Burgonet, ca. 1535–40, Italian, probably Milan. Steel, embossed, partly gilt and silvered. Overall dimensions, 10 13/16 x 8 1/16 x 11 5/8 in. (27.5 x 20.5 x 29.6 cm) Weight, 3.768 lb. (1709 g) © 2000–2013 The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

This helmet is formed as a dolphin-like sea monster, with furled brow, fierce eyes, sharp teeth, and a scaly body. It may have been inspired by the works of the Negroli family whose helmets are works of three-dimensional sculpture.

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Burgonet after Filippo Negroli, ca. 1545–50, Italian, Milan. Embossed steel. Weight, 3 lb. 10 oz. (1651 g) Height, 10 9/16 in. (26.82 cm) © 2000–2013 The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

This closely resembles two helmets by Filippo and Francesco Negroli in Madrid and Paris. Later over-cleaning removed the original dark surface and damascened decoration of our burgonet.

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Helmet all'antica. Attributed to Filippo Negroli (Italian, Milan, ca. 1510–1579), ca. 1532–35, Italian, Milan. Embossed steel. Weight, 2 lb. 2 oz. (964 g) Height, 11 1/4 in. (85 cm) Width, 8 1/4 in. (20.9 cm) Depth, 9 in. (22.7 cm) © 2000–2013 The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Fashioned to resemble a head of tightly curled hair encircled by a wreath of oak leaves, this helmet evokes the appearance of an ancient hero, perhaps a Roman emperor. The reference to the oak (rovere, in Italian) may indicate that the helmet was made for a member of the della Rovere family, dukes of Urbino. The cheek-pieces are probably nineteenth-century restorations.