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Water dropper in the shape of a crab, China, Dehua, Qing Dynasty (1644 - 1911), Kangxi era (1662 - 1722), 1675 - 1725. Porcelain, without painting. H. 5.2 cm, L 13.7 cm, depth 9.2 cmPO 8477. Porcelain Collection. © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 2013

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Water dropper in the shape of a crab, China, Dehua, Qing Dynasty (1644 - 1911), Kangxi era (1662 - 1722), 1675 - 1725. Porcelain, without painting. H. 4,7 cm, L. 14,3 cm, B. 10 cmPO 8478. Porcelain Collection. © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 2013

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Water dropper in the shape of a crab, China, Dehua, Qing Dynasty (1644 - 1911), Kangxi era (1662 - 1722), 1675 - 1725. Porcelain, without painting. H. 5.4 cm, L 14.5 cm, depth 9.8 cm. PO 8479. Porcelain Collection. © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 2013

A pure white body with a transparent glaze is characteristic of the porcelain kilns of Dehua (Fujian Province), which is referred to in Europe as the Blanc de Chine. Originally included the collection of Augustus the Strong, more than 1200 Dehua porcelains, of which about 500 are received in the Dresden collection. In addition to use ceramics and ritual containers, there are a large number of figurative Blanc de Chine porcelain, which include models of Buddist and Taoist people and sculptures of priests, women, dancers, lions, dogs, elephants, toys, small group presentations and Dutch families. Although there were also independent, small animal sculptures, but more often they acted as a useful objects such as brushes and incense holders on the tables scholars. Water droppers were designed creatively in various human and animal forms. In China, they used to mix the ink on an ink stone. Many of them, however, losing about their unusual form of functionality. So it is possible that the four water dropper (PO 8477, PO 8478, PO 8480) already served more decorative purposes in crab shape in China.