Sothebys-HK-Fall

HONG KONG.- Sotheby’s Hong Kong Magnificent Jewels and Jadeite Autumn Sale 2014 will take place on 7 October at Hall 3, Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre. The upcoming sale will highlight an array of rare and important colourless and coloured diamonds, including a 8.41-carat Internally Flawless Fancy Vivid Purple-Pink Diamond (Est. HK$100 – 120 million / US$13 – 15.5 million) and a 50.05-carat DIF Type IIa Diamond estimated at HK$60 – 70 million / US$7.7 – 9 million. They are complemented by coloured gemstones of exceptional proportions and quality including a 35.72-Carat Step-Cut Colombian Emerald (Est. HK$32 – 36 million / US$4 – 4.6 million), as well as a suite of jadeite jewellery formerly in the collection of the last Empress of China. Also highly anticipated is a signed piece – the Ballerina Butterfly Brooch co-designed by Cindy Chao and Sarah Jessica Parker to benefit the New York City Ballet (Est. HK$6 – 7.5 million / US$750,000 – 950,000). Altogether the sale will offer approximately 340 lots estimated in excess of HK$700 million / US$90 million*. 

QUEK Chin Yeow, Deputy Chairman of Sotheby’s Asia and Chairman of International Jewellery, Asia said, “This season we are extremely proud to offer a superb 8.41-carat fancy vivid purple-pink diamond of a beautiful hue of pink, great saturation and internally flawless clarity, which is one of the most desirable pink diamonds to come on the market in recent years. Spectacular and romantic is a heart-shaped DIF diamond weighing over 50 carats, one of several from an exceptional selection of diamonds, coloured gemstones and jadeite, with which the upcoming sale in October promises to be a tremendous acquisition opportunity for jewellery connoisseurs around the world.” 

HIGHLIGHTS
DIAMONDS 
Led by an extremely rare and desirable 8.41-Carat Pear-Shaped Internally Flawless Fancy Vivid Purple-Pink Diamond and Diamond Ring, mounted by Sotheby’s Diamonds (Est. HK$100 – 120 million / US$13 – 15.5 million), Sotheby’s Magnificent Jewels and Jadeite sale this season highlights a remarkable range of coloured and colourless diamonds.

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Lot 1941. A 8.41-Carat Pear-Shaped Internally Flawless Fancy Vivid Purple-Pink Diamond and Diamond Ring, mounted by Sotheby’s Diamonds. Estimate HK$100 – 120 million / US$13 – 15.5 millionLot sold 137,880,000 HKD (17,778,247 USD). Photo: Sotheby’s 2014.

Centring on a pear-shaped fancy vivid purple-pink diamond weighing 8.41 carats, to a stylized mount pavé-set throughout with circular-cut diamonds, mounted in platinum, signed Sotheby's Diamonds. Ring size: 5½

Accompanied by GIA report numbered 1162202561, dated 27 June 2014, stating that the 8.41 carat diamond is natural, Fancy Vivid Purple-Pink colour, Internally Flawless clarity, with Excellent Polish; further accompanied by diamond type classification report stating that the diamond is determined to be a Type IIa diamond. Type IIa diamonds are the most chemically pure type of diamond and often have exceptional optical transparency. Also accompanied by a signed box.

Most pink diamonds through the formation process tend to have less than desirable clarity and also tend to suffer from an inherent trait of internal graining, which affects the brilliance and luster. This 8.41 carat pink diamond is remarkable for its very crisp crystal and internally flawless clarity as well as being “highly transparent and very clear”. This diamond is rare for its size, beautiful hue, and exemplary rich saturation of colour. 

Following the 118.28-carat D-Flawless Diamond that sold for a world record price of HK$238.68 million / US$30.6 million in October 2013, Sotheby’s will bring to Hong Kong another highly important diamond, a 50.05- Carat Heart-Shaped D-Colour Internally Flawless Diamond Pendant (Est. HK$60 – 70 million / US$7.7 – 9 million). Apart from the most desirable colour and clarity grading, this “Romantic Heart” of Type IIa quality also boasts the highest chemical purity virtually free of nitrogen and therefore exceptional optical transparency. Heart-shaped diamonds are notoriously difficult to cut, and to polish, given the cleft. Beautiful heart- shaped diamonds of over 30 carats are rarely seen in the market and the present example, weighing more than 50 carats and certified to be of Excellent Polish, is undoubtedly a rare collecting opportunity. 

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A 50.05-Carat Heart-Shaped D-Colour Internally Flawless Diamond Pendant. Estimate HK$60 – 70 million / US$7.7 – 9 millionUnsold. Photo: Sotheby’s 2014.

Some of the most famous diamonds celebrated as great tokens of love are of heart shape, for obvious reasons. “The Windsor Heart”, the famed 47.14-carat Fancy Intense Yellow Diamond Pendant that once belonged to the Duchess of Windsor and subsequently the collection of Estee and Evelyn Lauder has marked its place in history; whereas the “Heart of Eternity”, a 27.64-carat fancy vivid blue diamond is reputedly the most famous heart-shaped diamond in recent years. 

Also of imposing proportions is a 100.26-Carat Pear-Shaped Fancy Deep Brown- Orange Diamond Pendant, perfectly paired with a Necklace signed Cartier (Est. HK$19 – 24 million / US$2.4 – 3 million). Diamonds weighing over 100 carats are extremely rare and this striking golden orange stone is certainly an impressive sight to behold. 

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A 100.26-Carat Pear-Shaped Fancy Deep Brown-Orange Diamond Pendant, perfectly paired with a Necklace signed Cartier. Estimate HK$19 – 24 million / US$2.4 – 3 millionUnsold. Photo: Sotheby’s 2014.

Among the rarest and most sought-after of coloured diamonds along with their pink counterparts, blue diamonds owe their natural colouration to the presence of the trace element boron during the stone’s formation. This 3.32-Carat Emerald-Cut Internally Flawless Fancy Vivid Blue Diamond and Diamond Ring (Est. HK$26 – 34 million / US$3.3 – 4.3 million), certified by the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) to be of Fancy Vivid Blue, the highest possible grading for blue diamonds, and Internally Flawless (IF) clarity, extremely rare in coloured diamonds, is certainly a delightful addition to any sophisticated jewellery collection. 

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Lot 1936. A 3.32-Carat Emerald-Cut Internally Flawless Fancy Vivid Blue Diamond and Diamond Ring. Estimate HK$26 – 34 million / US$3.3 – 4.3 millionLot sold 41,560,000 HKD (5,358,746 USD). Photo: Sotheby’s 2014.

Centring on an emerald-cut fancy vivid blue diamond weighing 3.32 carats, flanked by two trilliant-cut diamonds together weighing approximately 2.00 carats, mounted in 18 karat white gold. Ring size: 6

Accompanied by GIA report numbered 11892488, dated 12 March 2002, stating that the 3.32 carat diamond is natural, Fancy Vivid Blue colour, Internally Flawless clarity.

Please note that the certificate is more than 10 years old and might require an update.

The kaleidoscope of coloured diamonds would not be complete without the charming and delightful golden yellow, beautifully represented this season by a Pair of 14.36 and 14.32- Carat Fancy Vivid Yellow Diamond and Diamond Earrings (Est. HK$9.5 – 12 million / US$1.2 – 1.55 million). 

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A pair of Fancy Vivid yellow diamond and diamond earrings, the yellow diamonds each weighing 14.36 and 14.32 carats. Estimate HK$9.5 – 12 million / US$1.2 – 1.55 millionUnsold. Photo: Sotheby’s 2014.

COLOURED GEMSTONES 
The explosion of colours continues in the realm of natural gemstones, highlighted by a Pair of Unheated Burmese Mogok Ruby Earrings Weighing 6.80 and 6.70 Carats, Late 19th Century, formerly in the Collection of Mary, Duchess Of Roxburghe (Est. HK$20 – 25 million / US$2.5 – 3.2 million). Originating from Burma’s Mogok valley famed for the best rubies in the world, the two matching rubies, each weighing over five carats, possess a homogeneous red colour with good saturation and desirable clarity. This exquisite pair of ruby earrings was the property of Mary, Duchess of Roxburghe (pictured right), great-granddaughter of Baron Mayer de Rothschild and wife of the ninth Duke of Roxburghe. The Duchess was notable for her tenacity and striking deportment, and certainly for the splendid myriad of jewels that she inherited and wore. The Duchess worked for many charities and was President of the National Union of Townswomen’s Guilds. She was also a devoted patron of the Royal Ballet and an enthusiastic member of the Royal Society of Literature. This important pair of ruby earrings, together with an astonishing ruby necklace were thought to be purchased from Garrard by the fifth Earl of Rosebery in 1884 as recorded in his diary entry, just a few years after the acquisition of the Mogok Valley mines by the British. This suite of rubies may have been among the first Mogok specimens reaching England, most likely a present for Countess Rosebery, grandmother of the Duchess of Roxburghe, who eventually inherited the rubies.

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Lot 1937. Pair of Unheated Burmese Mogok Ruby Earrings Weighing 6.80 and 6.70 Carats, Late 19th Century, formerly in the Collection of Mary, Duchess Of Roxburghe. Estimate HK$20 – 25 million / US$2.5 – 3.2 millionLot sold 23,080,000 HKD (2,975,935 USD). Photo: Sotheby’s 2014. 

The ruby earrings are complemented in the sale by a 7.03-Carat Oval Unheated Burmese Mogok Pigeon’s Blood Ruby and Diamond Ring (Est. HK$8.6 – 9.8 million / US$1.1 – 1.25 million). 

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A 7.03-Carat Oval Unheated Burmese Mogok Pigeon’s Blood Ruby and Diamond Ring. Estimate HK$8.6 – 9.8 million / US$1.1 – 1.25 millionUnsold. Photo: Sotheby’s 2014.

An emblem of eternal love in Greek mythology, the emerald is famously treasured by some of the greatest icons of beauty in history, including the Egyptian Pharaoh, Cleopatra, and Elizabeth Taylor, one of the most celebrated and devoted modern-day patrons of emeralds. It is enchanting coincident that Elizabeth Taylor was gifted an extravagant suite of Bulgari emerald jewels from her then husband and co-star, Richard Burton, while filming with him in Italy as Cleopatra herself. Natural Colombian emeralds with a high clarity and enticing bluish-green body colour is highly uncommon. This natural 35.72-Carat Step-Cut Colombian Emerald and Diamond Ring (Est. HK$32 – 36 million / US$4 – 4.6 million) from the famed Muzo mine is not only of astonishing proportions but also endowed with richly saturated and homogeneous bluish-green colour and exceptional clarity, and is therefore an exceedingly rare gem of nature. Emerald connoisseurs will also be delighted by a Colombian Emerald and Diamond Necklace, Van Cleef & Arpels (HK$3.6 – 4.5 million / US$460,000 – 580,000), featuring nine step-cut emeralds pendants totalling approximately 40.28 carats. 

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Lot 1935. A 35.72-carat step-cut Colombian emerald and diamond ring, the emerald sourced from the famed Muzo mine. Estimate HK$32 – 36 million / US$4 – 4.6 millionLot sold 33,720,000 HKD (4,347,857 USD). Photo: Sotheby’s 2014. 

Centring on a step-cut emerald weighing 35.72 carats, to a mount set with circular-cut diamonds, mounted in platinum. Ring size: 6.

ccompanied by AGL, Gübelin and SSEF reports numbered CS 81982, 12021008 and 61734, dated 8 February, 12 March and 11 January 2012 respectively, stating that the 35.72 carat emerald is natural, of Colombian origin, with no indications of clarity enhancement.
The AGL Jewelfolio further states that 'this gem exhibits the richly saturated and homogeneous, slightly bluish-green color representative of fine-quality emeralds of the Muzo mining area...this gem possesses a high clarity,...such clarity in an emerald of 35 ct is very rare.'
The Gübelin Appendix also states that 'This emerald possessed a saturated and homogeneous colour, combined with an exceptional degree of transparency...Colombian emeralds of this size and possessing such a high quality with a complete absence of any clarity enhancement are very rare.'

FROM MUZO WITH LOVE

The characteristic green hue of emerald has been a fascination for both men and women for over six thousand years, and it remains one of the rarest and most valuable gemstones due to the many legends and prominent figures associated with it.

The Egyptian Pharaoh, Cleopatra, was known for her affinity for emeralds – she wore them not only as a symbol of power and wealth, the intense green brilliance was also the colour for rebirth and prosperity. It was amusingly coincidental that one of the most well-known and devoted patrons of emeralds in modern days, Elizabeth Taylor, was gifted an extravagant suite of Bulgari emerald jewels from her then husband, Richard Burton, while she was filming ‘Cleopatra’ with him in Italy, playing the great beauty herself. The sacred stone is seen as an emblem of eternal love in Greek mythology, and green is worn to honour the goddess of love, Aphrodite, more and more people have chosen this stone for their wedding rings in the recent years as a testimony to their undying love.

Emerald is a gemstone most tolerated for their natural inclusions that are sometimes arranged so gracefully that they complement its beauty. Yet, the most covetable Colombian treasures are those that are born with a high clarity and bluish-green body colour, which is highly uncommon. This emerald from the famed Muzo mine to be offered is endowed with this exact combination, not to mention that it weighs an astonishing 35.72 carats and is completely spared from clarity treatment. The existence of such a rare treasure is in effect unimaginable, making it a true connoisseurs gem.

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Lot 1751. A Colombian emerald and diamond necklace by Van Cleef & Arpels, featuring nine step-cut emerald pendants weighing 40.28 total carats. Estimate HK$3.6 – 4.5 million / US$460,000 – 580,000Lot sold 4,360,000 HKD (562,178 USD). Photo: Sotheby’s 2014.

Of graduating fringe design, suspending seven step-cut emeralds surrounded by variously-shaped diamonds, anchored by two step-cut emeralds to the centre and back, the necklace set with brilliant-cut diamonds, the emeralds and diamonds together weighing approximately 40.25 and 60.00 carats respectively, mounted in platinum and 18 karat yellow gold, length approximately 405mm, all pendants detachable, signed and numbered NY56607.

Accompanied by Gübelin report numbered 14061002/ 1 to 9, dated 9 June 2014, stating that the emeralds ranging from 9.26 to 1.93 carats are natural, of Colombian origin, with minor clarity enhancement. 

The auction also highlights a selection of rare top-quality sapphires, led by The Imperial Kashmir, A 17.16-Carat Step-Cut Unheated Kashmir Sapphire and Diamond Ring (Est. HK$22 – 28 million / US$2.8 – 3.6 million). Sapphires were first discovered in Kashmir, specifically in the Padar region in 1879 allegedly from a landslip. Kashmir sapphires today set the standard to which all other sources are compared. The sapphire set on this ring to be offered is of saturated cornflower blue colour and velvety texture, both are hallmarks of Kashmir specimens owing to needle inclusions in the gemstone. Its remarkable weight of over 17 carats is practically unseen in sapphires of such pedigree; combined with a homogeneous kingly blue colour and exceptional clarity which made an emerald cut possible, this extraordinarily rare gem displays superior qualities which are even rarely found in the finest Kashmir sapphires. Also impressive is a Pair of 44.11 And 40.11 Carat Unheated Burmese Sapphire and Diamond Pendent Earrings (Est. HK$9 – 11 million / US$1.1 – 1.4 million). 

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Lot 1938. The Imperial Kashmir, A 17.16-Carat Step-Cut Unheated Kashmir Sapphire and Diamond Ring. Estimate HK$22 – 28 million / US$2.8 – 3.6 millionLot sold 31,480,000 HKD (4,059,03 USD). Photo: Sotheby’s 2014.

Centring on a step-cut sapphire weighing 17.16 carats, surrounded by circular-cut and brilliant-cut diamonds together weighing approximately 6.00 carats, mounted in platinum. Ring size: 5¾

Accompanied by AGL, Gübelin and SSEF reports numbered CS 57785, 14045153 and 74095 respectively, stating that the 17.16 carat sapphire is natural, of Kashmir origin, with no indications of heating. The AGL letter further states that the sapphire 'displays a soft velvety "cornflower blue" colour that is commonly seen in sapphires of Kashmir origin...Large emerald cut Kashmir sapphires are rarely encountered in today's market. The provenance, size and intrinsic quality of the present 17.16 ct gem only adds to its rarity and desirability...In consideration of the special provenance, size and quality attributes of this exceptional gem, it has been named: The Imperial Kashmir.' Also accompanied by an SSEF Premium Appendix folio. 

THE IMPERIAL BLUE

Similar to rubies, sapphires belong to the group of corundum, which has a simple structure composed of aluminum and oxygen. Both elements are more than abundant in the earth crust, yet one of the colouring agents responsible for the alluring blue colour, titanium, is extremely scarce. In addition, the extreme conditions required for its formation is a major cause for inclusions in the crystals, making sizeable clean sapphires an exceedingly rare gem in nature. Of all the origins of sapphires that provided such geological conditions, one name spelled out the most revered and acclaimed cradle of the world’s finest sapphires – Kashmir.

Sapphires were first discovered in Kashmir, specifically in the Padar region in 1879 allegedly from a landslip. The amount of sapphire yielded from this area was plentiful to begin with, even the famous gem cutter Albert Ramsay, who visited India in the late 19th century, commented on this fact:

When I was last in the Srinagar palace of the Maharaja of Jammu and Kashmir thirty trays were brought before me, and if I were to say that any one tray, sent to the market, would fetch a million dollars, I would be giving only a faint impression of the astonishing wealth and beauty of those treasures.

Over the course of six and seven years, the productivity of the mine had steadily decreased. Area known to us nowadays as the ‘Old Mine’, where most of the top-quality Kashmir sapphires on the market were mined, was completely exhausted. The ‘New Mine’ found later, unfortunately, was only able to produce somewhat frosty and partially blue gems. 

Kashmir sapphires today set the standard to which all other sources are compared. The sapphire set on this ring to be offered is of saturated cornflower blue colour and velvety texture, both are hallmarks of Kashmir specimens owing to zonal turbidity and fine silks in the gemstone. Its remarkable weight of over 17 carats is practically unseen in sapphires of such pedigree; combined with a homogeneous kingly blue colour and exceptional clarity which made an emerald cut possible, this extraordinarily rare gem displays superior qualities which are even rarely found in the finest Kashmir sapphires.

 

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A pair of unheated Burmese sapphire and diamond pendant earrings, the sapphires each weighing 44.11 and 40.11 carats. Estimate HK$9 – 11 million / US$1.1 – 1.4 millionUnsold. Photo: Sotheby’s 2014. 

CONTEMPORARY DESIGN 
This season Sotheby’s is particularly honoured to present the 26.27-carat Fancy Brown-Yellow Diamond, Diamond and Conch Pearl “Ballerina Butterfly” Brooch, co-designed by contemporary fine jewellery artist Cindy Chao and actress, entrepreneur and philanthropist Sarah Jessica Parker to benefit the New York City Ballet (Est. HK$6 – 7.5 million / US$750,000 – 950,000). Modelled as a ballerina portraying a butterfly, the brooch features a cushion-cut fancy brown-yellow diamond weighing 26.27 carats, three diamond plaques of champagne hue together weighing approximately 47.70 carats and three conch pearls, surrounded by colourless and coloured diamonds weighing 97.95 carats in total.

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Lot 1781. A 26.27-carat Fancy Brown-Yellow Diamond, Diamond and Conch Pearl “Ballerina Butterfly” Brooch, co-designed by contemporary fine jewellery artist Cindy Chao and actress, entrepreneur and philanthropist Sarah Jessica Parker to benefit the New York City Ballet. Estimate HK$6 – 7.5 million / US$750,000 – 950,000. Lot sold 9,400,000 HKD (1,212,036 USD). Photo: Sotheby’s 2014.

Modelled as a ballerina portraying a butterfly, the wings set with a cushion-shaped fancy brown-yellow diamond weighing 26.27 carats and three diamond plaques of champagne hue together weighing approximately 47.70 carats, embellished by variously-shaped diamonds and coloured diamonds together weighing approximately 97.95 carats, the body of the ballerina set with two marquise-shaped diamonds together weighing approximately 1.85 carats, a pear- and a shield-shaped diamond weighing 2.52 and 1.04 carats respectively, highlighted by three conch pearls together weighing approximately 10.75 carats, mounted in titanium and 18 karat white gold, signed.

Accompanied by GIA report numbered 2145343963, dated 20 January 2012, stating that the 26.27 carat diamond is natural, Fancy Brown-Yellow colour, VS1 clarity; further accompanied by two GIA reports numbered 17226856 and 2141742291, dated 15 May 2008 and 19 June 2012 respectively, stating the 2.52 and 1.04 carat diamonds are both D colour, VS1 clarity. Also accompanied by a signed box.

Potential bidders who intend to export this lot are advised that certain permits may be required for export. If you are interested in this lot, please contact the Jewellery Department before bidding.

JADEITE 
Following the Hutton-Mdivani Necklace that set the World Auction Record for Jadeite Jewellery and a Cartier Jewel in April, Sotheby’s is pleased to present another treasure of historical importance, namely a Group of Late Qing Jadeite Jewellery comprising a Necklace, a Bangle and a Saddle Ring, formerly in the Collection of Empress Wanrong and an Overseas Collector (Est. HK$2 – 2.5 million / US$250,000 – 320,000). 

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Emperor Puyi and Empress Wanrong. Photo: Sotheby’s.

Born in 1906, Wanrong, who was to become the wife of Puyi, the last Emperor of China, was a descent from one of the most prominent Manchurian families. Like some of her contemporaries from respectable families with a more open mind to foreign culture, Wanrong attended an American missionary school in Tianjin and was well versed in Western etiquettes as well as traditional Chinese culture. She was considered to be ahead of her times and was known in society for her beauty and refinement. It is believed that Wanrong, as the last empress of the Qing dynasty, had assembled a huge collection of fine jewellery including jadeites of superb quality. 

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Photo of Wanrong and Puyi in modern attire

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Photo of Wanrong as an empress candidate.

This suite comprises a jadeite bead necklace, a saddle ring and a traditional bangle. The detailed craftwork of the gold filigree floral beads on the necklace, exclusively practised by court jewellers and listed as one of the most complicated among those executed at the Imperial workshop, testifies to its illustrious provenance. All the jadeite beads are of matching colour and texture, measuring at least 14.50 x 12.00 mm, indicating the size and therefore rarity of the original jadeite boulder. The saddle ring is of translucent emerald green throughout and a good thickness in the shank rarely seen in rings of the same category. The bangle also has a desirable thickness of 10.30 mm and a perfect green prevalent in the entire piece of material. Almost half a century ago, this rare suite of jadeite jewellery was presented by Empress Wanrong as a gift to the mother of its current owner, and carefully preserved in perfect condition as a testimony of the lasting charm and transient beauty of their past owners. 

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Lot 1898. Group of Late Qing Jadeite Jewellery comprising a Necklace, a Bangle and a Saddle Ring, formerly in the Collection of Empress Wanrong and an Overseas Collector. Estimate HK$2 – 2.5 million / US$250,000 – 320,000Lot sold 6,640,000 HKD (856,162 USD). Photo: Sotheby’s 2014.

Comprising: A necklace composed of eighteen translucent jadeite beads of slightly mottled emerald green colour, spaced by filigree guilt metal beads, length approximately 155mm; a translucent bangle of intense emerald green colour, slightly flattened to the inside; and a saddle ring of emerald green colour and good translucency. (3) Ring size: 3¾
Jadeite beads approximately 15.05 to 14.85mm; Inner diameter and thickness of bangle approximately 52.74 x 11.84mm; saddle top approximately 22.05 x 7.77mm.

Accompanied by three Hong Kong Jade & Stone Laboratory certificates numbered KJ 86471(1-3), KJ 86468 and KJ 86467, dated 22 July 2014, stating that the jadeites are natural, known in the trade as "A Jade".

Note: This season, we are extremely privileged to present a suite of jadeite jewellery from the Imperial Qing Court of highly important provenance. The very owner of this set of jewels was Empress Wanrong, the wife of Puyithe last Emperor of China and the last ruler of the Qing dynasty.

Born in 1906, Wanrong was a descendant from one of Manchuria’s most prominent and wealthy families. She attended an American missionary school in Tianjin and received private lessons on English and piano.  With her sophisticated knowledge of western etiquettes alongside mastery in traditional Chinese subjects, she was recognized as a very avant-garde young woman of her time. Her graceful composure and handsome looks was well-known in the upper class. In 1921, Wanrong was among the final candidates to be named empress by Puyi. Wanrong was an obvious choice agreed by the imperial consorts and eventually married Puyi a year after the official selection.

This suite of jadeite jewellery previously owned by Empress Wanrong comprises of a jadeite bead necklace, a saddle ring and a traditional bangle. The detailed craftwork of the gold filigree floral beads alone testified its provenance, as this craft was exclusively passed down to court artisans at that time. In addition, all the jadeite beads found on the necklace are of matching colour and texture, reaching a size of 14.50 x 12.00mm, we could only imagine the size and the rarity of the original jadeite rough, which was unquestionably reserved for the imperial court during that time. The saddle ring is of translucent emerald green throughout with a good thickness in the shank that is rarely seen in rings of the same category; and the bangle also has a desirable thickness of 10.30mm alongside a prevalent green colour.

Almost a century ago, this exquisite set of jadeite jewellery was presented as a gift to the mother of its current owner by Empress Wanrong. This gift was of such special weight and exceptional meaning that the owner kept them in perfect condition throughout the years without altering the original design. This gives us the invaluable opportunity to appreciate their lasting charm and imagine the transient beauty of their past owners, while acknowledging the timelessness of the finest jadeites and their imperishable elegance.

Other highlights include a Jadeite and Diamond Necklace (Est. HK$15 – 25 million / US$1.9 – 3.2 million) set with 20 graduated jadeite cabochons of emerald green colour and good translucency, spaced by oval diamonds together weighing approximately 9.00 carats, a Jadeite “Leaf” and Diamond Pendant (Est. HK$11 – 13 million / US$1.4 – 1.65 million) of intense emerald green colour and good translucency, as well as a Jadeite and Diamond Pendant (Est. HK$10 – 12 million / US$1.3 – 1.55 million) suspending an oval jadeite cabochon of emerald green colour and fine translucency.  

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Lot 1766. A Jadeite and Diamond Necklace, set with 20 graduated jadeite cabochons of emerald green color and good translucency. Estimate HK$15 – 25 million / US$1.9 – 3.2 millionLot sold 18,040,000 HKD (2,326,078 USD). Photo: Sotheby’s 2014. 

Set with twenty graduated jadeite cabochons of emerald green colour and fine translucency, spaced by oval diamonds together weighing approximately 9.00 carats, mounted in 18 karat white gold, length approximately 410mm. Cabochons approximately 19.18 x 14.39 x 8.95mm to 11.33 x 8.70 x 5.10mm.

Accompanied by Hong Kong Jade & Stone Laboratory certificate numbered KJ 87057(1-3), dated 18 August 2014, stating that the jadeites are natural, known in the trade as "A Jade".

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Lot 1920. A Jadeite and Diamond Pendant suspending an oval jadeite cabochon of emerald green color and fine translucency. Estimate HK$10 – 12 million / US$1.3 – 1.55 million. Lot sold 10,240,000 HKD (1,320,346 USD). Photo: Sotheby’s 2014.

Suspending a highly translucent oval jadeite cabochon of emerald green colour, surrounded by brilliant-cut diamonds, surmounted by an oval jadeite cabochon of matching colour and translucency, framed by circular-cut diamonds, linked by a brilliant-cut diamond, the diamonds together weighing approximately 1.90 carats, mounted in 18 karat white gold, accompanied by a link-chain, length approximately 440mm.
Cabochons approximately 22.82 x 18.30 x 9.57mm and 14.86 x 12.20 x 8.18mm respectively.

Accompanied by two Hong Kong Jade & Stone Laboratory certificates numbered KJ 86572(1-2), dated 31 July 2014, stating that the jadeites are natural, known in the trade as "A Jade".

 

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A jadeite “Leaf” and diamond pendant of intense emerald green color and good translucency. Estimate HK$11 – 13 million / US$1.4 – 1.65 million. Unsold. Photo: Sotheby’s 2014.

Also of notable interest is a Carved Icy Multi-Colour Jadeite “Guan Yin” Ornament (Est. HK$6 – 10 million / US$770,000 – 1.3 million). This exceptional carving of Guan Yin, the Buddhist goddess of mercy and compassion, displays not only outstanding workmanship but also unparalleled quality. With a thickness of 64.80 mm and a weight of 1.25 kg, the massive body of jadeite remains highly translucent and almost completely free from any visible flaws and inclusions, suggesting an enormous rough of exceptional quality and meticulous workmanship involved. Its charming hues of green, lavender and amber were thoughtfully put into play, with the serenity of Guan Yin accentuated in purple and set against a lush green background, complimented by a dab of soft yellow on the tree top suggesting the dawning sun in the distance. This exquisite carving is surely the perfect embodiment of Guan Yin’s noble mercy and grace. 

 

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Lot 1765. A Carved Icy Multi-Colour Jadeite “Guan Yin” Ornament featuring a carving of the Buddhist goddess of mercy and compassion and weighing 1.25 kg. Estimate HK$6 – 10 million / US$770,000 – 1.3 millionLot sold 14,440,000 HKD (1,861,894 USD). Photo: Sotheby’s 2014.

The highly translucent multi-coloured jadeite suffused with patches of light to deep green colour, embellished by splashes of amber yellow, carved with a Guan Yin resting on a lotus flower and a boy to the left, to a background carved with clouds and trees. Ornament approximately 119.80 x 148.82 x 64.80mm.

Accompanied by Hong Kong Jade & Stone Laboratory certificate numbered KJ 86733, dated 7 August 2014, stating that the jadeite is natural, known in the trade as "A Jade". Also accompanied by a wooden stand, a rock crystal stand, a bronze platform and a fitted box. 

MERCIFUL GUAN YIN

Guan Yin, short for Guanshiyin, is a Buddhist goddess of mercy and compassion, with a name that translates to ‘observing the sounds of cries of the world’, and thus comes to the sufferers’ rescue. Her mercy is infinite, her heart opened to all beings in peril, her presence brings luck and peace.

This exceptional carving of a Guan Yin displays not only outstanding workmanship, but unparalleled quality in comparison to jadeite carvings from the same category. The multi-colour jadeite consists of three prominent colours, green, lavender and amber. With a thickness of 64.80mm and a weight of 1.25 kg, the jadeite is still highly translucent and almost completely free from any visible flaws and inclusions, suggesting an enormous rough and intensive work required to create this rare piece of art. Its charming colours and hues were thoughtfully put into play - accentuating the grace and serenity of Guan Yin in purple, the background set in lush green, and a dab of soft yellow on the tree top, just as the sun breathes out the first enlightening gleam. Amidst lofty clouds and petals of lotus flower flows and swirls the goddess’ rope, carefree and unrestraint; this exquisite carving is surely the perfect embodiment of Guan Yin’s great mercy and magnanimousness.