156228

A molded and enameled porcelain 'dragon and phoenix' snuff bottle, Jiaqing mark and of the periodEstimate US$ 2,000 - 3,000 (€1,800 - 2,700). Photo Bonhams. 

Of elongated, tapering ovoid form rising to its waisted neck beneath a flat lip, molded on one side with a three-clawed dragon chasing a flaming pearl and a phoenix turning in flight in pursuit of a beribboned ruyi scepter, amidst dense clouds and formalized flames, framed between bands of ruyi-head above the splayed foot ring and key-fret patterns on the neck; covered all over with turquoise-blue enamels except for the foot pad with traces of gilt; the recessed base incised with the four-character mark in seal script. 2 1/2in (6.4cm) high 

ProvenanceAsiantiques, 13 January 1995

NotesCompare two other closely related bottles from the Mary and George Bloch collection, illustrated by Moss, Graham and Tsang, A Treasury of Chinese Snuff Bottles: The Mary and George Bloch Collection, Vol.6, Arts of the Fire, Hong Kong, 2008, pp.460-463, no. 1206, 1207, and sold in these rooms, 23 November 2010, lot 96 and 25 May 2011, lot 96. See also a third example from the collection of Denis S. K. Low, illustrated by Denis S.K. Low, More Treasures from The Sanctum of Enlightened Respect, Hong Kong, 2002, p.197, pl.182.

It is clear that monochrome glazes of varying colors were used to imitate various raw materials such as cinnabar lacquer, lapis lazuli and turquoise matrix. However, early examples of ceramic bottles imitating turquoise matrix dated to the Qianlong period are usually subtly enameled with black lines. By the Jiaqing period, molded porcelain bottles in monochrome colors with dragon and phoenix design were prevalent wedding gifts for the extended Imperial family.

Bonhams. CHINESE SNUFF BOTTLES FROM THE COLLECTION OF BARBARA AND MARVIN DICKER, 16 Mar 2015 10:00 EDT - NEW YORK