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Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

NEW YORK, NY.- Christie’s announced its upcoming schedule of Winter Jewelry sales in New York, starting with the live saleroom auction of Magnificent Jewels on December 10, and continuing with a companion online boutique of Holiday Jewels from December 11 – 21. Both venues offer a multitude of outstanding jewels at every price level, including fancy colored and colorless diamonds, rare gemstones, natural pearls, and signed creations from the most coveted jewelry houses. Auction highlights, along with informative videos, buying tips, and Christie’s specialists’ Holiday Gift Suggestions are available for browsing online at Christie's now. 

The Magnificent Jewels auction on December 10 features more than 500 lots, including signed pieces from Boucheron, Cartier, David Webb, Harry Winston, Van Cleef & Arpels, and more. Prominent private collections comprise the most important jewels offered this season, with jewelry from the estate of New York philanthropist and socialite Carroll Petrie crowning the evening session. 

Estimates range from $2,000 to over $4 million and the entire Magnificent Jewels auction will be on public view December 5 through December 9, at Christie’s Rockefeller Center galleries. 

PROPERTY FROM THE ESTATE OF CAROLL PETRIE 
From a young age, Carroll McDaniel Petrie (pictured below) had a strong passion for beauty and great design and an early inspiration came when her first marriage to the Marquis de Portago brought her to Paris. There she became enamored with the fashions of Christian Dior, and even collaborated with the designer in the creation of her wedding dress. Her great love of beauty and keen eye allowed Mrs. Petrie to build a remarkable collection of fine and decorative art, haute couture, and jewels. 

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Mrs. Carroll Petrie with Joan Rivers.

From the late-1950s, Mrs. Petrie established herself as an icon of international society and philanthropy, living and mingling among the elite in Paris, Hong Kong, and New York. Many of the pieces presented in this sale were worn during her meetings with notable figures such as President Ronald Reagan and Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, just to name a few. Carroll Petrie patronized many of the great jewelers of the twentieth century, including Van Cleef & Arpels, Jean Schlumberger, and David Webb, all of which are represented in the auction. 

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Lot 493. From the Estate of Carroll Petrie. A diamond ‘Cadenas’ bracelet watch, by Van Cleef & Arpels. Estimate: $50,000-70,000Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

With mechanical jeweled lever movement, the rectangular silvered dial with applied square-shape faceted and dot numerals, enclosed in a circular-cut diamond-set padlock case, to the snake link double chain bracelet, circa 1940, 6 3/8 ins., with French assay marks for platinum. Signed Van Cleef & Arpels, no. 150251.

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Lot 522. From the Estate of Carroll Petrie. A multi-gem and diamond 'Hedges and Rows' necklace, by Jean Schlumberger, Tiffany & Co. Estimate: $50,000-70,000Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

The cascading flexible openwork collar with circular-cut diamond fringe, extending circular turquoise cabochons, each within a circular-cut diamond spray, enhanced by cushion-cut rubellite tourmalines, 16 3/4 ins., mounted in platinum and 18k gold, in a Tiffany & Co. black suede case. Signed Schlumberger for Jean Schlumberger, Tiffany & Co.

NotesOriginally introduced in 1960, the 'Hedges and Rows' necklace is among Schlumberger’s greatest designs. For a similar example set with turquoise and yellow sapphires please refer to Suzanne Tennenbaum and Janet Zapata, “The Jeweled Garden”, Thames & Hudson, London 2006, page 128.

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Lot 513. From the Estate of Carroll Petrie. A cultured pearl, diamond, emerald and enamel brooch, David WebbEstimate: $20,000-30,000. Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

Centering upon a cultured baroque pearl, to the openwork black enamel plaque, trimmed with circular-cut diamonds and cabochon emeralds, suspending three drop-shaped cultured baroque pearls, 3 1/8 ins., mounted in platinum and 18k gold. Signed Webb for David Webb.

COLORED GEMSTONES 
Christie’s will present an impressive selection of exceptional emeralds, rubies and sapphires this December. Key highlights include rare sapphires from the Estates of Beatrice Goelet Manice and Gladys (Patsy) Pulitzer Preston, an important ruby and diamond ring from Harry Winston and an extraordinary cabochon emerald of over 50 carats. 

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Lot 460. From the Estate of Beatrice Goelet Manice. The Manice Saphir. A Belle Époque 12.52 carats Kashmir Sapphire and Diamond Ring. Estimate: $1,500,000-2,500,000. Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

Set with a cushion-cut sapphire, weighing approximately 12.52 carats, to the old-cut diamond gallery and shoulders, circa 1910, ring size 5, mounted in platinum

Accompanied by report no. 81760 dated 3 September 2015 from SSEF Swiss Gemmological Institute stating that it is the opinion of the Institute that the origin of this the sapphire would be classified as Kashmir, with no indication of heating

With report no. CS 69750 dated 19 August 2015 from AGL American Gemological Laboratories stating that it is the opinion of the Laboratory that the origin of this sapphire would be classified as Kashmir, with no gemological evidence of heat

ProvenanceMrs Arthur Curtiss James, Newport, Rhode Island and New York 
Mrs. William DeForest Manice
Thence by descent

The Manice Saphir. This spectacular Belle Époque Kashmir sapphire ring epitomizes what is most sought-after in a period jewel: rarity and impeccable provenance. This ring was formerly in the collection of Mrs. Arthur Curtiss James and Mrs. William DeForest Manice. Arthur Curtiss James was a prominent millionaire who gained his fortune predominantly through the railroad industry. He and his wife built the famed Beacon Hill House in Newport, Rhode Island which was known as one of the grandest estates in the area. Mrs. James designed exceptional gardens, a farming complex and a large ballroom for hosting society parties.

It is known that Mrs. James had a love for jewels and a particular afinity for sapphires. She was even referred to as “Lady Sapphire” after appearing at the “Masque of the Blue Garden” ball wearing sensational sapphire jewelry. Today the Blue Gardens have been recreated on its original site by Mrs. Samuel M.V. Hamilton, serving as a reminder of the glamour and beauty of the gilded age that the James family built around themselves. 

The James’ had no children and upon the death of Mrs. James, the ring was bequeathed to her niece Mrs. William DeForest Manice. Christie’s is proud to ofer such an extraordinary jewel that has remained in the same family since it was frst acquired.

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Lot 121. From the Estate of Gladys (Patsy) Pulitzer Preston. A Burmese "Royal Blue" Sapphire and Diamond Ring, by Boucheron. Estimate: $400,000-600,000. Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

Set with a rectangular-cut sapphire, weighing approximately 23.98 carats, to the single and rose-cut diamond gallery and bullet-shaped diamond shoulders, ring size 5 1/2, mounted in platinum. Signed Boucheron, Paris no. 3123

Accompanied by report no. CS 70653 5 October 2015 from the AGL American Gemological Laboratories stating that it is the opinion of the Laboratory that the origin of this sapphire would be classified as Classic Burma (Myanmar). No gemological evidence of heat. Also accompanied by a letter stating that Burmese sapphires of this color and character are commonly described in the trade as "royal blue"; and that this exceptional gem possesses high clarity, providing a superior degree of transparency

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Lot 481. A 22.25 carats Burma Ruby and Diamond Ring, by Harry Winston. Estimate: $700,000 – $1,200,000. Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

Set with a cushion-cut ruby, weighing approximately 22.25 carats, flanked on either side by a trapezoid-shaped diamond, ring size 7 1/2, mounted in platinum

Accompanied by report no. CS 70663 dated 1 October 2015 from the AGL American Gemological Laboratories stating that it is the opinion of the Laboratory that the origin of this ruby would be classified as Burma (Myanmar), with no gemological evidence of heat

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Lot 140. A 53.46 carats Colombian Emerald and Diamond Ring. Estimate: $200,000-300,000Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

Set with a pyramidal cabochon emerald, weighing approximately 53.46 carats, within a circular-cut diamond surround, ring size 6, mounted in gold

Accompanied by report no. CS 66066 dated 13 February 2015 from the AGL American Gemological Laboratories stating that it is the opinion of the Laboratory that the origin of this emerald would be classified as Classic Colombia, with insignificant to minor clarity enhancement, traditional type

NATURAL PEARLS 
Natural pearls formed part of every royal and state collection for centuries and continue to remain in high demand. The Magnificent Jewels auction provides beautiful examples of necklaces from Cartier and Tiffany & Co., matched drop earrings and an elegant antique brooch formerly owned by Nancy Witcher Langhorne Astor, the first woman elected to serve in the British Parliament.  

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Lot 369. Formally from the collection of Nancy Witcher Langhorne Astor. An antique diamond and natural pearl brooch. Estimate: $60,000-80,000Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

Set with a natural button-shaped pearl, measuring approximately 17.33 – 17.80 x 13.35 mm, flanked on each side by old-cut diamond clusters, 1 3/4 ins., circa 1890, mounted in silver-topped gold, in a fitted case

With a signed letter dated 10 August 2015 from Georgina Mary Astor Nelson stating that the brooch had belonged to her paternal grandmother, Nancy Witcher Langhorne Astor

With report no. 81866 dated 27 August 2015 from the SSEF Swiss Gemmological Institute stating that the pearl is a natural saltwater pearl

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© 2015 Curatorial Assistance, Inc. / E.O. Hoppé Estate Collection

Nancy Witcher Langhorne Astor (1879-1964), an American socialite and popular society hostess in England, was the frst woman elected to serve in British Parliament. Prior to taking her seat in the House of Commons, Astor encouraged her husband, Waldorf Astor, to enter politics. He was elected in 1910 and served until his father’s death in 1919. Upon inheriting the title of viscount, the Lord was obligated to give up his seat in Parliament. Lady Astor campaigned to fll her husband’s vacated seat and was elected that same year. Known for her boldness and sharp wit, she was a strong advocate for temperance, women’s rights, the police force and educational reform. Christie’s is proud to ofer the following lot from Lady Astor’s collection.

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Lot 353. pair of early 20th century natural pearl and diamond ear pendants. Estimate: $300,000-500,000Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

Each suspending a drop-shaped natural pearl, measuring approximately 12.90 – 13.45 x 19.40 mm and 12.10 – 13.15 x 19.50 mm, from a single-cut diamond cap, to the circular-cut diamond surmount, early 20th century, 1 1/2 ins., mounted in platinum, in a Garrard & Co. Ltd. plum leather fitted case

Accompanied by report no. 80476 dated 5 June 2015 from the SSEF Swiss Gemmological Institute stating that the properties confirm the authenticity of the pearls as natural saltwater

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Lot 212. two-strand natural pearl necklace, by CartierEstimate: $250,000-350,000. Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

Comprising two strands of forty-six and fifty natural pearls, measuring from approximately 9.00 to 6.50 mm, to the pear, marquise and circular-cut diamond clasp, 1958, 15 ins. (shortest strand), mounted in platinum
Signed Cartier, no. 123- (partially indistinct)
Accompanied by report no. 80578 dated 9 June 2015 from the SSEF Swiss Gemmological Institute stating that the analysed properties confirm the authenticity of these saltwater natural pearls

Accompanied by an original insurance appraisal from Cartier, dated 27 May 1958 

DIAMONDS 
Christie’s continues its reputation for offering the most important historical and rare diamonds available in the market today. We are proud to offer once again the famous “Victory” diamond, named to commemorate the Allied victory in World War II. The “Victory” was last offered at Christie’s in 1984 as part of the famous Collection of Florence J. Gould. Other notable stones include the “Petrie” diamond ring, a D color stone of 24.34 carats by Harry Winston, and a beautifully cut diamond pendant of 103.66 carats as well as an impressive selection of fancy colored pinks, blues, oranges and yellows. 

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Lot 350. Formerly the Property of Florence J. Gould. The “Victory” Diamond. A D color, VVS2 clarity rectangular-cut Type IIa diamond of 31.34 carats. Estimate: $4,000,000-5,000,000. Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

Set with a rectangular-cut diamond, weighing approximately 31.34 carats, flanked on either side by a baguette-cut diamond, ring size 5 3/4 ins., mounted in platinum

Accompanied by report no. 5151960000 dated 27 February 2014 from the GIA Gemological Institute of America stating that the diamond is D color, VVS2 clarity; accompanied by a working diagram indicating that the clarity of the diamond is potentially Internally Flawless 

With a supplemental letter from the Gemological Institute of America stating that the diamond has been determined to be a Type IIa diamond. Type IIa diamonds are the most chemically pure type of diamond and often have exceptional optical transparency. Type IIa diamonds were first identified as originating from India (particularly from the Golconda region) but have since been recovered in all major diamond-producing regions of the world. Among famous gem diamonds, the 530.20 carat Cullinan I and the 105.60 carat Koh-i-noor, are examples of Type IIa

Literature: I. Balfour, Famous Diamonds, England, Christie, Mason and Woods Ltd., 2000, p. 289

Note: Previously sold at Christies's New York, The Collection of Florence J. Gould, 11 April 1984, lot 482

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Lot 523. Property from the Estate of Carroll Petrie. The Petrie Diamond. A D color, VVS1 clarity pear modified brilliant-cut Type IIb diamond of 31.34 carats. Estimate: $4,000,000-5,000,000. Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

Set with a pear modified brilliant-cut diamond, weighing approximately 24.34 carats, flanked on either side by a tapered baguette-cut diamond, ring size 3 3/4, mounted in platinum. With maker's mark for Harry Winston

Accompanied by report no. 2175284438 dated 19 August 2015 from the GIA Gemological Institute of America stating that the diamond is D color, VVS1 clarity

Accompanied by a supplemental letter from the Gemological Institute of America stating that the diamond has been determined to be a type IIb diamond. Type IIb diamonds are very rare in nature (from our experience, less than one half of one percent) and contain small amounts of boron that can give rise to a blue or gray coloration. An unusual property of type IIb diamonds is that they are semi-conductors and conduct electricity. Historically, the ancient mines of India produced occasional blue diamonds but today the most significant source is limited to the Cullinan (formerly Premier) Mine in South Africa. Among famous gem diamonds, the 70.21 carat Idol's Eye and the 45.52 carat Hope, are examples of type IIb 

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Lot 334. A round brilliant- cut fancy intense blue Type IIb diamond ring of 1.74 carats Estimate: $700,000-1,000,000Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

Set with a round brilliant-cut fancy intense blue diamond, weighing approximately 1.74 carats, to the plain platinum hoop, ring size 6

Accompanied by report no. 5171282289 dated 24 September 2015 from the GIA Gemological Institute of America stating that the diamond is fancy intense blue, natural color, VVS1 clarity; accompanied by a working diagram indicating that the clarity of the diamond is potentially Internally Flawless 

With a supplemental letter from the Gemological Institute of America stating that the diamond has been determined to be a Type IIb diamond. Type IIb diamonds are very rare in nature and contains small amounts of boron that can give rise to a blue or gray coloration. An unusual property of type IIb diamonds is that they are semi-conductors and conduct electricity. Historically, the ancient mines of India produced occasional blue diamonds but today the most significant source is limited to the Cullinan (formerly Premier) Mine in South Africa. Among famous gem diamonds, the 70.21 carat Idol’s Eye and the 45.52 carat Hope are examples of type IIb

 

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Lot 335. A cut–cornered rectangular fancy vivid purplish pink diamond ring of 3.74 carats. Estimate : $1,300,000-1,500,000Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

Set with a cut-cornered rectangular modified brilliant fancy vivid purplish pink diamond, weighing approximately 3.74 carats, flanked on either side by a tapered baguette-cut diamond, ring size 5 3/4, mounted in platinum

Accompanied by report no. 6177105940 dated 8 April 2015 from the GIA Gemological Institute of America stating that the diamond is fancy vivid purplish pink, natural color

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Lot 354. A Belle Époque marquise-cut fancy to fancy intense blue diamond ring, by J.E. Caldwell. Estimate: $400,000-600,000Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

Set with a marquise brilliant-cut fancy to fancy intense blue diamond, to the circular and old-cut diamond surround, pierced gallery and shoulders, circa 1915, ring size 7, mounted in platinum. Signed J.E.C Co. for J.E. Caldwell, no. G 257

Accompanied by report no. 15223652 dated 29 June 2006 from the GIA Gemological Institute of America stating that the diamond is fancy to fancy intense blue, natural color

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Lot 141. A D color, VVS1 clarity rectangular-cut Type IIa diamond ring of 28.28 carats. Estimate: $2,800,000-3,500,000Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

Set with a rectangular-cut diamond, weighing approximately 28.28 carats, flanked on either side by a baguette-cut diamond, ring size 5 3/4, mounted in platinum. 

Accompanied by report no. 1172017398 dated 11 February 2015 from the GIA Gemological Institute of America stating that the diamond is D color, VVS1 clarity; also with a working diagram indicating that the clarity of the diamond is potentially Internally Flawless

With a supplemental letter from the Gemological Institute of America stating that the diamond has been determined to be a Type IIa diamond. Type IIa diamonds are the most chemically pure type of diamond and often have exceptional optical transparency. Type IIa diamonds were first identified as originating from India (particularly from the Golconda region) but have since been recovered in all major diamond-producing regions of the world. Among famous gem diamonds, the 530.20 carat Cullinan I and the 105.60 carat Koh-i-noor, are examples of Type IIa

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Lot 483. A rectangular-cut pendant necklace of 103.66 carats. Estimate: $3,900,000-4,500,000Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

Set with a rectangular-cut diamond, weighing approximately 103.66 carats, from a circular-cut diamond pendant hoop, to the fine link neckchain, 17 3/4 ins., mounted in platinum

Accompanied by report no. 6173304698 dated 9 September 2015 from the GIA Gemological Institute of America stating that the diamond is L color, VS2 clarity

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Lot 461. A D color, VS1 clarity cushion-cut Type IIa diamond ring of 43.79 carats. Estimate: $4,000,000-5,000,000. Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

Set with a cushion brilliant-cut diamond, weighing approximately 43.79 carats, ring size 6, mounted in platinum

Accompanied by report no. 1172331975 dated 22 October 2015 from the GIA Gemological Institute of America stating that the diamond is D color, VS1 clarity

With a supplemental letter from the Gemological Institute of America stating that the diamond has been determined to be a Type IIa diamond. Type IIa diamonds are the most chemically pure type of diamond and often have exceptional optical transparency. Type IIa diamonds were first identified as originating from India (particularly from the Golconda region) but have since been recovered in all major diamond-producing regions of the world. Among famous gem diamonds, the 530.20 carat Cullinan I and the 105.60 carat Koh-i-noor, are examples of Type IIa

SIGNED JEWELS 
Unique signed pieces from top international designers including Boucheron, Cartier, Graff, Harry Winston, Van Cleef & Arpels and more are among the key highlights of the sale. A top lot from the selection includes an iconic art deco coral bracelet by Cartier, with additional highlights including a diamond and gold ballerina brooch designed in arabesque pose, and two ‘Mystery Set’ flower brooches by Van Cleef & Arpels.  

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Lot 38. A diamond and gold Ballerina brooch, by Van Cleef & Arpels. Estimate: $60,000-80,000Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

Designed as a gold ballerina in arabesque pose, with a rose-cut diamond head and circular-cut diamond headband, to the circular-cut diamond top and rose-cut diamond tutu, circa 1955, 3 1/8 ins. Signed Van Cleef & Arpels, N.Y., no. 38121

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Lot 151. An Art Deco coral, diamond and onyx bracelet, by Cartier. Estimate: $80,000-120,000Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

Designed as three rows of carved coral beads, the top row enhanced by collet-set circular-cut diamonds, joined by a circular and baguette-cut diamond clasp, with onyx detail, circa 1930, 7 1/2 ins., with French assay marks for platinum. Signed Cartier, Paris, with maker's mark, nos. 03353, 03644 and 31-- (partially indistinct)

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Lot 348. A ‘Mystery-Set’’ ruby and diamond flower brooch, by Van Cleef & Arpels. Estimate: $120,000-180,000Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

Designed as a calibré-cut ruby flower, centering upon a circular-cut diamond cluster pistil, extending a detachable baguette-cut diamond stem and marquise-cut diamond leaves, 3 1/4 ins., mounted in platinum. Signed Van Cleef & Arpels, N.Y., no. 43983

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Lot 349. A ‘Mystery-Set’ sapphire and diamond flower brooch, by Van Cleef & Arpels. Estimate: $100,000-150,000. Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2015

Designed as a calibré-cut sapphire flower, centering upon a circular-cut diamond cluster pistil, extending a baguette-cut diamond stem and marquise-cut diamond leaves, 2 3/4 ins., mounted in platinum. Signed Van Cleef & Arpels, N.Y., no. 43885

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Lots 348 & 349. A ‘Mystery-Set’’ ruby and diamond flower brooch, estimate: $120,000-180,000 & A ‘Mystery-Set’ sapphire and diamond flower brooch, estimate $100,000-150,000; each by Van Cleef & ArpelsPhoto Christie's Image Ltd 2015