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Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Self-Portrait, ca. 1615–17. Oil on panel 14 3/8 × 10 1/8 in. (36.5 × 25.8 cm) Rubenshuis, Antwerp.

NEW YORK, NY.- Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), one of the most celebrated and influential portraitists of all time, enjoyed an international career that took him from his native Flanders to Italy, France, and, ultimately, the court of Charles I in England. Van Dyck’s elegant manner and convincing evocation of a sitter’s inner life—whether real or imagined—made him the favorite portraitist of many of the most powerful and interesting figures of the seventeenth century. His sitters—poets, duchesses, painters, and generals—represent the social and artistic elite of his age, and his achievement in portraiture marked a turning point in the history of European painting. Van Dyck: The Anatomy of Portraiture, on view only at New York’s Frick Collection, looks comprehensively at the artist’s activity and process as a portraitist. It is also the first major exhibition devoted to his work to be held in the United States in more than twenty years. Through approximately one hundred works, the show explores the versatility and inventiveness of a portrait specialist, the stylistic development of a draftsman and painter, and the efficiency and genius of an artist in action. Organized chronologically around the different geographic chapters of Van Dyck’s career, the exhibition documents the artist’s development from an ambitious young apprentice into the most sought-after portrait painter in Europe. The show also includes a small selection of comparative works by Van Dyck’s contemporaries, including Rubens, Jordaens, and Lely, and a special installation of the Iconographie, Van Dyck’s celebrated series of portrait prints. Lenders to the exhibition include the Palazzo Pitti in Florence, the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna, the British Museum and National Gallery in London, the Prado Museum in Madrid, and major private collectors such as the Duke of Devonshire and the Duke of Buccleuch and Queensberr.

Born in 1599 to a family of patrician merchants, Anthony van Dyck endured a childhood marred by his mother’s early death and his father’s financial instability. In 1610, he enrolled as an apprentice to the painter Hendrick van Balen, although Peter Paul Rubens, Antwerp’s most celebrated artist, would exert a far greater influence on his development. By his late teens, the young Van Dyck was already assisting Rubens on large-scale commissions. A brief sojourn in England followed by a stay of roughly six years in Italy cemented his emergence as a mature painter in his own right, familiar with the great masters of the Italian Renaissance and the most sophisticated courts of Europe. One of the most important loans in the exhibition was painted during this period: Van Dyck’s 1623 portrait of Cardinal Guido Bentivoglio, from the Galleria Palatina at the Palazzo Pitti in Florence. In the Baroque period, Van Dyck's depiction of Bentivoglio was much emulated and became the benchmark for any portrait of a prince of the Church. Its exclusive trip to the Frick marks only the second time in the painting's history that it has left Italy. 

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Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Head Study of a Youth, ca. 1615–17. Oil on paper, 20 1/8 × 16 1/4 in. (51.2 × 41.4 cm); original size, 14 × 10 1/2 in. (35.6 × 26.7 cm). National Gallery of Art, Washington; Gift of Adolph Caspar Miller.

5

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Portrait Study of a Standing Man (Alexander Vincque?), 1616 or before. Black and red chalk on buff paper, 20 3/4 × 13 3/4 in. (52.6 × 35 cm). National Gallery of Art, Washington; Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund.

6

Peter Paul Rubens (1577–1640), The Jesuit Nicolas Trigault in Chinese Costume, 1617. Black, red, and white chalk, yellow (fabricated?) chalk and blue-green fabricated chalk, pen and brown ink, on buff (?) paper, 17 1/2 × 9 3/4 in. (44.6 × 24.8 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Purchase, Carl Selden Trust, several members of the Chairman’s Council, Gail and Parker Gilbert, and Lila Acheson Wallace Gifts, 1999 

7

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), The Jesuit Nicolas Trigault in Chinese Costume, 1617. Black chalk and blue-green fabricated chalk, 16 3/4 × 9 5/8 in. (42.4 × 24.4 cm). The Morgan Library & Museum, New York 

8

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Head Study of a Red-Haired Young Woman Looking Down, ca. 1618–20. Oil on paper, 22 1/4 × 16 3/8 in. (56.5 × 41.6 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Gift of Mrs. Ralph J. Hines, 1957 

9

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Portrait of a Carmelite Friar, ca. 1618. Oil on panel, 24 1/2 × 18 7/8 in. (62.3 × 48 cm). Private collection.

10

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Portrait Study of a Man on Horseback with His Groom, 1620–21 (or 1628–32?). Pen and brown ink, 9 1/16 × 9 5/8 in. (23 × 24.5 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Gift of Harold K. Hochschild, 1940

12

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Self-Portrait, ca. 1620–21. Oil on canvas, 47 1/8 × 34 5/8 in. (119.7 × 87.9 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; The Jules Bache Collection.

14

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Portrait of a Seventy-Year-Old Man, 1613. Oil on canvas, 24 3/4 × 17 1/8 in. (63 × 43.5 cm). Koninklijke Musea voor Schone Kunsten van België / Musées Royaux des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, Brussels. 

47

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Portrait Study of a Commander on Horseback Triumphing over Evil, and Crowned by Victory1621–ca. 1627. Pen, brush, and brown ink, with brown wash, over black chalk, 8 1/2 × 7 1/4 in. (21.5 × 18.4 cm). The British Museum, London.

48

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), George Gage with Two Men, ca. 1622–23. Oil on canvas, 45 1/4 × 44 3/4 in. (115 × 113.5 cm). The National Gallery, London.

49

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Guido Bentivoglio, Seated (?), 1623. Brush and brown ink over black chalk (and graphite?), 15 5/8 × 10 3/8 in. (39.6 × 26.3 cm). Musée des Beaux-Arts de la ville de Paris, Petit Palais, Paris.

50

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Cardinal Guido Bentivoglio, 1623. Oil on canvas, 76 3/4 × 57 7/8 in. (195 × 147 cm). Galleria Palatina, Palazzo Pitti, Florence.

51

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Standing Woman in a Nun’s Habit (Archduchess Isabella Clara Eugenia?), ca. 1627. Pen and brown ink on paper, 6 3/16 × 4 1/4 in. (15.7 × 10.8 cm). Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Helen and Alice Colburn Fund.

52

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Ernestine Yolande, Countess of Nassau-Siegen, Seated, with Her Son, Johann Franz Desideratus. Black chalk, heightened with white chalk, on blue paper. The British Museum, London.

55

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Portrait Study of a Lady, with Studies of Her Hands, ca. 1628–34. Black chalk, heightened with white chalk, on gray-green (formerly blue) paper, 19 7/8 × 11 13/16 in. (50.5 × 30 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Bequest of Walter C. Baker, 1971

56

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Portrait Study of Anna van Thielen and Her Daughter, Anna Maria Rombouts, ca. 1631–32. Black chalk, pen, and brown ink, 12 1/2 × 10 5/16 in. (31.7 × 26.2 cm). The Morgan Library & Museum, New York.

57

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Johann of Nassau-Siegen, Standing, Wearing Armor,  ca. 1634. Black chalk, heightened with white chalk, on blue paper. The British Museum, London.

58

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Marie-Claire de Croÿ with Her Son Philippe-Eugène, 1634. Oil on canvas, 82 1/2 × 48 1/2 in. (208.7 × 123.2 cm). Legion of Honor, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco; Roscoe and Margaret Oakes Collection.

59

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Cesare Scaglia Adoring the Virgin and Child, ca. 1634–35. Oil on canvas, 42 × 47 1/4 in. (106.7 × 120 cm). The National Gallery, London.

60

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Portrait Study of Henrietta of Lorraine, 1634. Black chalk, heightened with white chalk, on light gray (formerly blue) paper, 22 5/8 × 12 in. (57.3 × 30.2 cm). Scottish National Gallery, Edinburgh; David Laing Bequest to the Royal Scottish Academy.

61

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Two Studies of Cesare Alessandro Scaglia, ca. 1634. Black chalk on blue paper, 20 1/16 × 13 5/16 in. (50.9 x 33.8 cm). The British Museum, London.

62

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Portrait Study of a Man, Looking Left, ca. 1634. Oil on canvas, 21 3/4 × 17 3/4 in. (55.3 × 45.1 cm). Private collection.

63

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Portrait Study of Quintijn Simons, ca. 1634. Black chalk, heightened with white chalk, on blue paper, 17 1/2 × 11 in. (44.3 × 28 cm). The British Museum, London.

64

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Justice Flanked by Seven Magistrates of the City of Brussels, ca. 1634. Oil on panel, squared in oil, 10 3/8 × 23 in. (26.3 × 58.5 cm). École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts, Paris.

65

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Portrait Study of a Man, Facing Right, ca. 1634. Oil on canvas, with paper extensions on each side, 25 × 19 1/2 in. (63.5 × 49.5 cm). Private collection.

66

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Johann of Nassau-Siegen, Seated, ca. 1634. Black chalk, heightened with white chalk, on blue paper, 20 1/16 × 13 5/16 in. (50.9 x 33.8 cm). The British Museum, London.

67

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Cesare Alessandro Scaglia, Seated, ca. 1634. Black chalk, heightened with white chalk, on brown paper, 19 1/8 × 12 3/4 in. (48.6 × 32.4 cm). Frits Lugt Collection, Fondation Custodia, Paris.

In 1632, Van Dyck was appointed principal painter to Charles I of England. The portraits he produced over the following decade, before his premature death in 1641, are among his most celebrated and feature heavily in the exhibition. Included in the exhibition is a horizontal portrait of Charles I and his queen Henrietta Maria, now in the collection of Archiepiscopal Castle and Gardens, Kroměříž, The Czech Republic. This remarkable canvas has never before traveled to the United States. Coming from the National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., is Van Dyck’s portrait Queen Henrietta Maria with Jeffrey Hudson. A more intimate work of Princesses Elizabeth and Anne comes to New York from the Scottish National Portrait Gallery. 

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Robert van Voerst (1597–1635/36) after Anthony van Dyck, Charles I and Henrietta Maria Holding a Laurel Wreath, 1634. Engraving (second state), 16 3/4 × 22 1/2 in. (42.2 × 57.1 cm). Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, The Royal Collection, Windsor.

16

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Charles I and Henrietta Maria Holding a Laurel Wreath, 1632. Oil on canvas, 41 × 69 1/4 in. (104 × 176 cm). Archbishop’s Castle and Gardens, Kroměříž.

17

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Portrait Study of Charles I, ca. 1632–36. Black chalk, 18 7/8 × 14 3/8 in. (47.9 × 36.5 cm). Rijksprentenkabinet, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam; purchased with the support of the Vereniging Rembrandt.

18

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Queen Henrietta Maria with Jeffery Hudson, 1633. Black chalk, red and yellow (fabricated?) chalks, heightened with white chalk, on blue paper, 16 1/2 × 10 1/8 in. (41.9 × 25.5 cm). École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts, Paris.

19

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Queen Henrietta Maria with Jeffery Hudson, 1633. Oil on canvas, 86 1/4 × 53 1/16 in. (219.1 × 134.8 cm). National Gallery of Art, Washington; Samuel H. Kress Collection.

20

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), The Princesses Elizabeth and Anne, Daughters of Charles I, 1637. Oil on canvas, 11 3/4 × 16 1/2 in. (29.8 × 41.8 cm). Scottish National Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh; purchased with the aid of the Heritage Lottery Fund, the Scottish Office and the Art Fund 1996

21

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Prince William of Orange and Mary, Princess Royal, 1641. Oil on canvas, 71 7/8 × 55 7/8 in. (182.5 × 142 cm), Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam.

22

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Portrait Study of Endymion Porter and His Son Philip, ca. 1632–33. Black chalk, heightened with white chalk, on buff paper, 12 ½ × 9 1/2 in. (31.7 × 24.1 cm). The British Museum, London.

23

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Two Portrait Studies of Philip Porter, ca. 1632–33. Black chalk on buff paper, Statens Museum for Kunst, Copenhagen.

24

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Study of the Upper Body and Hands of George Porter, ca. 1632–33. Black chalk on buff paper. Statens Museum for Kunst, Copenhagen.

25

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Thomas Howard, Earl of Arundel, Turned to the Right, ca. 1635–36. Black chalk, heightened with white chalk, on blue paper, 9 1/2 × 8 1/2 in. (24.2 × 21.6 cm). The British Museum, London.

26

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Thomas Howard, Earl of Arundel, Seated, ca. 1635–36. Black chalk, heightened with white chalk, on gray-brown paper, 19 × 13 7/8 in. (48.4 × 35.3 cm). The British Museum, London.

27

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Portrait Study of James, William, and John Herbert, Standing on Stairs, Facing Right, 1633–35. Black chalk, heightened with white chalk, on blue paper, 17 3/8 × 10 5/8 (42.2 × 27. 1 cm). École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts, Paris.

29

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Portrait Study of James Stuart, Duke of Lennox and Richmond, Standing, ca. 1633. Black chalk, heightened with white chalk, on light brown paper, 18 7/8 × 11 in. (47.9 × 28 cm). The British Museum, London.

30

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Two Studies of a Greyhound, ca. 1633. Black chalk, heightened with white chalk, on light brown paper, 18 7/8 × 12 3/4 in. (47.8 × 32.4 cm). The British Museum, London.

31

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Portrait Study of a Young Man (Bernard Stuart?), ca. 1638. Black chalk, heightened with white chalk, on gray-blue paper, 13 1/2 × 8 3/4 in. (34.3 × 22.3 cm). The British Museum, London.

32

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Portrait Study of a Young Man in Classical Garb, ca. 1632–41. Black chalk on buff paper, 15 7/8 × 10 1/8 in. (40.2 × 25.7 cm). Fogg Museum, Harvard Art Museums, Cambridge; Alpheus Hyatt Purchasing Fund.

33

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Study of the Head of a Lady Facing Left, ca. 1635–40. Black chalk on light-brown (formerly blue) paper, 9 13/16 × 8 3/16 in. (25 × 20.8 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Rogers Fund, 1926

36

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), John Suckling, ca. 1638. Oil on canvas, 85 1/4 × 51 1/4 in. (216.5 × 130.2 cm). The Frick Collection; Henry Clay Frick Bequest.

37

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Pomponne II de Bellièvre, ca. 1637–40. Oil on canvas, 54 × 43 1/2 in. (137.2 × 110.5 cm). Seattle Art Museum; Purchased with a major grant from an anonymous donor; additional funds provided by Louise Raymond Owens; Norman and Amelia Davis; Oliver T. and Carol Erickson; Seattle Art Museum Guild; Pauline Ederer Bolster and Arthur F. Ederer in memory of their sister, Milli Ederer Kastner; Mr. and Mrs. James D. Burns; gift in memory of Andrew Price by Mrs. Mary Price and their family; bequest of Mr. and Mrs. Archibald Stewart Downey; bequest of Charles Moseley Clark; Max R. Schweitzer; gift of Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Stimson, Thomas D. Stimson Memorial Collection; Eugene Fuller Memorial Collection; Silver Anniversary Fund; Margaret E. Fuller Purchase Fund; Seattle Art Museum Purchase Fund by exchange.

38

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Edmund Verney, ca. 1640. Oil on canvas, 53 3/8 × 42 5/8 in. (135.5 × 108.2 cm). Private collection, on long-term loan to the National Portrait Gallery, London.

39

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Portrait of a Woman, ca. 1640. Oil on canvas, 29 7/8 × 23 1/4 in. (75.9 × 59.1 cm). Speed Art Museum, Louisville; Museum Purchase, Preston Pope Satterwhite Fund. 

44

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), François Langlois, Playing a Musette, 1641 (?). Black chalk, heightened with white chalk, on buff paper, 15 1/2 × 11 1/8 in. (39.3 × 28.3 cm). Frits Lugt Collection, Fondation Custodia, Paris.

45

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), François Langlois, Playing a Musette, 1641 (?). Oil on canvas, 41 1/4 × 33 1/8 in. (104.8 × 84.1 cm). The National Gallery, London, and Barber Institute of Fine Arts, Birmingham.

In addition to showcasing notable works from European collections, Van Dyck: The Anatomy of Portraiture also shines a spotlight on important paintings by Van Dyck from American private and public collections, many of which have not been included in previous exhibitions on the artist. These paintings are a legacy of the longtime fascination that Van Dyck has exerted on American collectors, including Henry Clay Frick, who acquired no fewer than eight paintings by the artist. Among these is the portrait of Frans Snyders, a fellow painter and close artistic collaborator, purchased in the summer of 1909 by Frick, who also acquired that same year the pendant portrait of Snyders’s wife, Margareta de Vos. Painted about 1620 when the artist was roughly twenty years old, the two portraits reveal the prodigy’s startling talent, expressed in likenesses that combine supreme elegance with a subtle element of melancholy. Other Frick-owned works included in the exhibition are the full-length canvas Lady Anne Carey, Later Viscountess Claneboye and Countess of Clanbrassil, and the recently conserved Portrait of a Genoese Noblewoman, at left. 

13

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Frans Snyders, ca. 1620. Oil on canvas, 56 1/8 × 41 1/2 in. (142.5 × 105.4 cm). The Frick Collection; Henry Clay Frick Bequest.

11

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Margareta de Vos, ca. 1620. Oil on canvas, 51 1/2 × 39 1/8 in. (130.7 × 99.3 cm). The Frick Collection; Henry Clay Frick Bequest.

34

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Lady Anne Carey, Later Viscountess Claneboye and Countess of Clanbrassil, ca. 1636. Oil on canvas, 83 1/2 × 50 1/4 in. (212.1 × 127.6 cm). The Frick Collection; Henry Clay Frick Bequest.

35

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), James Stanley, Lord Strange, Later Seventh Earl of Derby, with His Wife, Charlotte, and Their Daughter, ca. 1636. Oil on canvas, 97 × 84 1/8 in. (246.4 × 213.7 cm). The Frick Collection; Henry Clay Frick Bequest.

46

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Genoese Noblewoman, ca. 1625–27. Oil on canvas, 90 7/8 × 61 5/8 in. (230.8 × 156.5 cm). The Frick Collection; Henry Clay Frick Bequest.

APPROACH TO PREPARATION OF PORTRAITS A MAJOR THEME 
Van Dyck’s singularity is most apparent in his approach to preparing a portrait, and initial sketches and unfinished paintings compose one of the major themes of the show. Portrait drawings by his contemporaries, including Peter Lely and Jacob Jordaens, highlight the distinct way he created his celebrated portraits. Whereas many artists made detailed studies of a sitter’s face before beginning work on a painting, Van Dyck preferred rough sketches that mapped a sitter’s pose but left many details unresolved. He would then usually paint the sitter directly from life, studying his or her face without an intermediary drawing. This approach is apparent especially in unfinished works, such as the Portrait of a Woman from the Speed Museum in Louisville. Here, the haunting depiction of the unknown woman’s face contrasts with passages intended to be completed by studio assistants. The Frick’s exhibition reunites preparatory works and finished paintings, in some cases for the first time since they left Van Dyck’s studio several hundred years ago. A preparatory drawing of the English court musician and painter Nicholas Lanier, from the Scottish National Gallery, for example, is being displayed alongside the related portrait, on loan from Vienna’s Kunsthistorisches Museum. In the drawing, Van Dyck worked with black and white chalk on blue paper, swiftly laying out the fall of fabric of Lanier’s cloak, the play of his curls, his elegant hands, and his almost supercilious expression. Nonetheless, the artist made a number of changes in the final composition: instead of holding out a glove in his right hand, Lanier’s arm is akimbo, the hand tucked invisibly at his side. Less obviously, Van Dyck removed a lock of hair to leave Lanier’s temple exposed. These alterations indicate how Van Dyck continued to think through his composition as he transitioned from preparatory drawing to canvas. Remarking on the artist’s meticulous process, Lanier told the painter Peter Lely that he “sat seven entire days” for his portrait, but “was not permitted so much as once to see it till [Van Dyck] had perfectly finished the face to his own satisfaction.” Such anecdotes combine with the physical evidence of Van Dyck’s works to allow for the exhibition’s reconstruction of the artist’s working method. 

53

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Nicholas Lanier, ca. 1628. Oil on canvas, 43 3/4 × 34 1/2 in. (111 × 87.6 cm). Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna.

54

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Portrait Study of Nicholas Lanier, ca. 1628. Black chalk, heightened with white chalk, on blue paper, 15 1/2 × 11 3/8 in. (39.4 × 28.8 cm). Scottish National Gallery, Edinburgh; Lady Murray of Henderland gift 1860 as a memorial of her husband, Lord Murray of Henderland.

102

Peter Paul Rubens (1577–1640), Hendrick van Thulden, ca. 1615–16. Black chalk, on buff paper, 14 3/4 × 10 3/8 in. (37.4 × 26.2 cm). The British Museum, London.

103

Jacob Jordaens (1593–1678), Catharina Behagel, 1635 or shortly before. Black chalk, heightened with white chalk, 11 1/2 × 7 3/4 in. (29.2 × 19.7 cm). Frits Lugt Collection, Fondation Custodia, Paris.

104

Attributed to Jan Cossiers (1600–1671), Head Study of a Man Looking Left, ca. 1630–50 (?). Black chalk, heightened with white chalk, on buff paper, 9 1/2 × 7 1/2 in. (24 × 19.1 cm). Rijksprentenkabinet, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam.

105

Unknown Flemish Artist, Study of a Standing Man in Armor, ca. 1650. Pen and black ink, brush and gray and brown ink, with white, gray, and yellow gouache, and black and red chalk, 16 3/4 × 10 1/4 in. (42.6 × 26.1 cm). Fogg Museum, Harvard Art Museums, Cambridge; Gift of The Honorable and Mrs. Robert Woods Bliss.

106

Unknown (probably Flemish) Artist, Study of a Man’s Torso and Hands, mid- to late seventeenth century. Black chalk, heightened with white chalk, on buff paper, 10 × 8 1/4 in. (25.5 × 21 cm)
École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts, Paris.

107

Cornelis Jonson van Ceulen the Elder (1593–1661), Study of the Hands of a Lady of the Raphoen Family, 1646 or before. Black and white chalk on blue paper, 7 1/2 × 11 5/8 in. (19 × 29.5 cm). The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles.

108

Peter Lely, born Pieter van der Faes (1618–1680), Study of a Hand and Drapery, ca. 1658. Black and red chalk, heightened with white chalk, on gray (formerly blue) paper, 12 5/8 × 8 3/8 in. (32.1 × 21.2 cm). Detroit Institute of Arts; Founders Society Purchase, William H. Murphy Fund.

PAN-EUROPEAN DISTRIBUTION OF HIS WORK IN PRINT 
Van Dyck made astute use of reproductive prints to ensure that his portraits had a pan-European distribution. This is particularly apparent in his so-called Iconographie series of printed portraits, depicting a range of sitters who included fellow Flemish artists, learned scholars, statesmen, and aristocratic ladies. The Iconographie receive its own special installation at the Frick, encompassing prints, drawings, oil sketches, and one of the earliest bound volumes of Van Dyck’s portrait prints, on loan from the Rijksmuseum.  

As well as the work of professional engravers, the Iconographie features some of Van Dyck’s autograph etchings, which are among the greatest prints ever made. These include Van Dyck’s etching, after his portrait of Frans Snyders. In his paintings of Snyders and his wife, the young Van Dyck depicted the pair amidst various trappings of prosperity—elegant clothing, furniture, and a distant view of parkland. In his print, made more than a decade later, Van Dyck stripped Snyders’s portrait down to just head and shoulders. Translated from oil on canvas into a new medium, the etching reveals the variety of Van Dyck’s graphic vocabulary. Stippling maps the contours of Snyders’s brow, cheekbones, and forehead, yielding to loose crosshatching in areas of greater shadow. Calligraphic lines, meanwhile, convey Snyders’s nonchalantly arranged hair and upturned mustache. Such a minimal etching was intended to appeal to the most sophisticated collectors, but Van Dyck also collaborated with highly skilled professional engravers to create more traditional prints for wider distribution. To assist these engravers, Van Dyck prepared both drawings and exquisite grisailles, or gray-scale oil sketches. In the exhibition, four of these grisailles demonstrate Van Dyck’s unusual mastery of this refined medium. 

68

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Gaspar Gevaerts, ca. 1627–35. Oil on panel, 8 1/4 × 6 1/2 in. (24.8 × 18.7 cm). The Duke of Buccleuch and Queensberry KBE, Boughton House, Northamptonshire.

69

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Self-Portrait, ca. 1627–35. Etching (first state), 9 5/8 × 6 1/8 in. (24.4 × 15.6 cm). The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.

70

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Gaspar de Crayer, ca. 1627–35. Oil on panel. The Duke of Buccleuch and Queensberry KBE, Boughton House, Northamptonshire.

71

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Pieter Brueghel the Younger, ca. 1627–35. Etching (first state), 9 5/8 × 6 1/8 in. (24.4 × 15.6 cm). Fogg Museum, Harvard Art Museums, Cambridge; Gift of Walter C. Klein.

72

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Gaspar Gevaerts, ca. 1627–35. Black chalk, incised for transfer, 10 5/8 in. × 7 1/2 in. (27 × 19 cm). Albertina, Vienna.

73

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Pieter Brueghel the Younger, ca. 1627–35. Black chalk, 9 5/8 × 7 3/4 in. (24.5 × 19.8 cm). The Duke of Devonshire and the Trustees of the Chatsworth Settlement, Chatsworth, Derbyshire.

74

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Hendrick van Balen, 1627–32. Black chalk, 9 5/8 × 7 3/4 in. (24.3 × 19.8 cm). The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles.

75

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Gaspar de Crayer, ca. 1627–35. Black chalk, 9 5/8 × 7 1/2 in. (24.3 × 19 cm). The Duke of Devonshire and the Trustees of the Chatsworth Settlement, Chatsworth, Derbyshire.

76

Lucas Vorsterman the Elder (1595/96–1674/75) after Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Joos de Momper the Younger, ca. 1627–35. Etching and engraving (third state), 9 × 6 1/8 in. (23 × 15.6 cm). Frits Lugt Collection, Fondation Custodia, Paris.

77

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Joos de Momper the Younger, ca. 1627–35. Etching (first state), 9 5/8 × 6 1/8 in. (24.4 × 15.6 cm). The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.

78

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Manuel Frockas, 1631–32 (?). Black chalk, 9 5/8 × 7 7/8 in. The Duke of Devonshire and the Trustees of the Chatsworth Settlement, Chatsworth, Derbyshire.

79

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Manuel Frockas, 1631–32 (?). Oil on panel, 8 1/4 × 6 1/4 in. (21 × 15.9 cm). The Duke of Buccleuch and Queensberry KBE, Boughton House, Northamptonshire.

80

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Adriaen Brouwer, ca. 1634. Oil on panel, 8 1/2 × 6 3/4 in. (21.6 × 17.2 cm). The Duke of Buccleuch and Queensberry KBE, Boughton House, Northamptonshire.

81

Lucas Vorsterman the Elder (1595/96–1674/75) after Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Anthony van Dyck, ca. 1635. Engraving (fourth state), 9 7/8 × 6 1/4 in. (25.1 × 15.8 cm). Frits Lugt Collection, Fondation Custodia, Paris.

82

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Orazio Gentileschi, ca. 1635. Black chalk, gray wash, pen and brown ink; incised for transfer, 9 3/8 × 7 in. (24 × 17.9 cm). The British Museum, London.

83

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641) and Jacob Neefs (1610–1660), Anthony van Dyck, ca. 1644. Etching and engraving (third state). In Icones Principum . . . (Antwerp, 1645 or 1646), bound in gold-stamped seventeenth-century calfskin, Rijksprentenkabinet, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam.

84

 Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Inigo Jones, 1632–36.Black chalk, pen and brown ink; squared for transfer in black chalk, 9 5/8 × 7 7/8 in. (24.4 × 20.1 cm). The Duke of Devonshire and the Trustees of the Chatsworth Settlement, Chatsworth, Derbyshire.

86

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641) and an Unidentified Engraver, Paulus Pontius, ca. 1627–30. Etching (second state), 9 1/8 × 7 1/4 in. (23.3 × 18.3 cm. Rijksprentenkabinet, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam.

86

Paulus Pontius (1603–1658) after Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Paulus Pontius, ca. 1627–35. Engraving (fifth state), 9 5/8 × 7 1/8 in. (24.6 × 18.2 cm). Frits Lugt Collection, Fondation Custodia, Paris.

87

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Jan van Ravesteyn, 1628–29 or 1632. Black chalk, 10 × 7 7/8 in. (25.3 × 20.1 cm), Albertina, Vienna.

88

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Nicolaas Rockox, ca. 1627–35. Black chalk, 11 3/4 × 8 1/2 in. (30.2 × 21.7 cm). Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, Royal Collection, Windsor.

89

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Nicolaas Rockox, 1636. Oil on panel, diam. 6 in. (15.2 cm). Collection Howard and Nancy Marks.

90

Paulus Pontius (1603–1658) after Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Nicolaas Rockox, 1639. Engraving (first state), 10 1/2 × 7 1/8 in. (26.7 × 18.2 cm). Frits Lugt Collection, Fondation Custodia, Paris.

91

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Frans Snyders, ca. 1627–35. Etching (first state), 9 5/8 × 6 1/8 in. (24.4 × 15.6 cm). Fogg Museum, Harvard Art Museums, Cambridge; Gift of Walter C. Klein, Class of 1939

92

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Hendrick van Steenwijck the Younger, ca. 1632−38. Black chalk, gray wash; incised for transfer, 10 3/4 × 8 1/4 in. (27.2 × 20.9 cm). Städel Museum, Frankfurt am Main.

93

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Lucas Vorsterman, ca. 1631 (?). Black chalk, 9 3/4 × 7 in. (24.4 × 17.9 cm). The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.

94

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Lucas Vorsterman, ca. 1631 (?). Etching (first state), 15 3/4 × 10 3/4 in. (40.1 × 27.2 cm). The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.

95

Lucas Vorsterman the Younger (1624–1666 or later) after Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Lucas Vorsterman the Elder, ca. 1650 (?). Engraving (fourth state), 9 7/8 × 7 in. (25 × 17.8 cm), Frits Lugt Collection, Fondation Custodia, Paris.

96

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Sebastiaan Vrancx, ca. 1628–31. Black chalk, 10 1/16 × 7 3/8 in. (25.6 × 18.7 cm). The British Museum, London.

97

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Jan Wildens, ca. 1627–32. Black chalk, light and dark gray and brown washes; incised for transfer, 9 1/8 × 7 7/8 in. (23.3 × 20 cm). The British Museum, London.

98

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), with additional etching and engraving attributed to Lucas Vorsterman the Elder (1595/96–1674/75), Jan van den Wouwer, 1632 (?). Etching and engraving (second state), 9 3/4 × 6 1/4 in. (24.9 × 15.8 cm). Rijksprentenkabinet, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam.

99

Paulus Pontius (1603–1658) after Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Stadholder Frederick Henry, Prince of Orange, ca. 1638 (?). Engraving (third state), 19 × 13 1/2 in. (48.3 × 34.2 cm). Frits Lugt Collection, Fondation Custodia, Paris.

100

Theodor Matham (1605–1676) after Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Michiel le Blon, 1632–54. Engraving (sixth state), 11 3/8 × 7 5/16 in. (28.9 × 18.6 cm). Rijksprentenkabinet, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam.

BEYOND SOCIETY: FAMILY AND SELF-PORTRAITS 
Van Dyck used portraiture to represent the very pinnacle of contemporary society, but it also provided him with a vehicle to explore intimate relationships and his own identity. The exhibition includes portraits of Van Dyck’s wife, Mary, as well as the woman believed to have been his mistress, the courtesan Margaret Lemon. Lemon appears in three-quarter profile, delicately touching the fabric at her shoulder in a gesture of refinement that would fascinate subsequent generations of artists. The painting, long considered lost but now in a New York private collection, inspired a spate of imitations during the seventeenth century. Van Dyck was an avid self-portraitist throughout his career, and four of his self-portraits are included in the exhibition. In the earliest of these, executed about 1613–15, an adolescent Van Dyck turns his head to study his own likeness. His piercing stare and the boldness of his brushwork presaged a career that would prove seminal for the history of European painting. Visitors to Van Dyck: The Anatomy of Portraiture will have an unprecedented chance to immerse themselves in that achievement.

43

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Mary, Lady van Dyck, née Ruthven, ca. 1640. Oil on canvas, 41 × 32 in. (104 × 81 cm). Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid.

40

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Head Study of a Reclining Woman, Possibly Margaret Lemon, ca. 1638–39 (?). Black and red chalk, heightened with white chalk, 7 5/8 × 9 3/4 in. (19.5 × 24.7 cm). The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.

41

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Margaret Lemon, ca. 1638. Oil on canvas, 23 3/8 × 19 1/2 in. (59.5 × 49.5 cm). Private collection, New York. 

42

Jean Morin (ca. 1605–1650), after Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Margaret Lemon, 1646. Etching (second state), 12 5/16 × 10 1/16 in. (31.2 × 25.5 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Harris Brisbane Dick Fund, 1941

2

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), Self-Portrait, ca. 1613–15. Oil on panel, 10 1/8 × 7 5/8 in. (25.8 × 19.5 cm). Gemäldegalerie der Akademie der bildenden Künste, Vienna.