A russet-splashed black-glazed globular jar, Northern Song-Jin dynasty (960-1234)

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Lot 715. A russet-splashed black-glazed globular jar, Northern Song-Jin dynasty (960-1234); 4.15/16 in. (12.5 cm.) wide. Estimate USD 20,000 - USD 30,000Price realised USD 81,250. © Christie's Image Ltd 2016

The jar is well potted with a compressed globular body and a narrow mouth, and is supported on a slightly splayed foot. It is covered with a thick lustrous blackish-brown glaze accented with russet splashes, stopping neatly above the lower body and exposing the body of greyish-brown color, Japanese wood box.

Provenance: Alfred E. Mirsky (1900-1974) Collection; Christie’s New York, 29 March 2006, lot 402.
Sen Shu Tey, Tokyo

LiteratureChristie's, The Classic Age of Chinese Ceramics, An Exhibition of Song Treasures from the Linyushanren Collection, Hong Kong, 2012, p. 88, no. 28.

ExhibitedChristie's, The Classical Age of Chinese Ceramics: An Exhibition of Song Treasures from the Linyushanren Collection, Hong Kong, 22 to 27 November 2012; New York, 15 to 20 March 2013; London, 10 to 14 May 2013.

NoteThe bold russet splashes accenting the blackish-brown glaze on this handsome jar are often referred to as zhegu ban, or ‘partridge-feather mottles’. In his discussion of a russet-splashed black-glazed meiping in the Art Institute of Chicago, R. D. Mowry, in Hare’s Fur, Tortoiseshell, and Partridge Feathers: Chinese Brown-and Black Glazed Ceramics, 400-1400, Cambridge, 1996, pp. 137-8, no. 35, notes that the “term, zhegu ban (partridge-feather mottles) appears in texts of the mid-tenth century to describe ceramics with mottled decoration,” and that ‘partridge-feather mottles’ began to appear in dark-glazed Cizhou-type wares in the eleventh century. The glaze on the present jar, with its bold, yet well-controlled splashes of even russet tone, is particularly successful and attractive.

Christie's. The Classic Age of Chinese Ceramics: The Linyushanren Collection, Part II. 15 September 2016, New York, Rockefeller Plaza