4969-055

Urbino (?), Plate with the Plague of Phrygia (after Raphael), c. 1535/1540, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Corcoran Collection (William A. Clark Collection).

WASHINGTON, DC.- The first exhibition of its kind in the United States, Sharing Images: Renaissance Prints into Maiolica and Bronze, brings together some 90 objects to highlight the impact of Renaissance prints on maiolica and bronze plaquettes. Accompanied by a publication that provides a comprehensive introduction to different aspects of the phenomenon—from the role of 15th-century prints and the rediscovery of classical art to the importance of illustrated books and the artistic exchanges between Italy and northern Europe—Sharing Images is on view on the ground floor of the West Building from April 1 through August 5, 2018. 

"This exhibition provides an unprecedented opportunity to examine the extent and depth of prints, plaquettes, and maiolica in the Gallery's collection," said Earl A. Powell III, director, National Gallery of Art. "The visual links between these objects vividly demonstrate that Renaissance prints, produced in large numbers and rapidly diffused, were among the earliest viral images in European art. We are grateful for a grant from the Eugene V. and Clare E. Thaw Charitable Trust, which made it possible to explore the complex and unpredictable connections shared between these works of art." 

Arranged chronologically, this exhibition is inspired by the acquisition of the William A. Clark maiolica collection from the Corcoran Gallery of Art and draws largely on the Gallery's newly expanded holdings of early Italian prints (founded on the Rosenwald gift and augmented by recent acquisitions), as well as on the world-renowned Kress collection of plaquettes and medals. It traces the metamorphosis that designs by Andrea Mantegna, Antonio del Pollaiuolo, Raphael, Michelangelo, Parmigianino, and Albrecht Dürer, among others, underwent across these different media. 

4969-026

Marcantonio Raimondi after Raphael, Il Morbetto (The Plague), c. 1514, engraving, sheet (trimmed to plate mark): 19.5 x 25.2 cm (7 11/16 x 9 15/16 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of W.G. Russell Allen.

Sharing Images tells the story of how printed images were transmitted, transformed, and translated onto ceramics and small bronze reliefs, creating a shared visual canon across artistic media and geographical boundaries. Often acknowledged, but rarely studied in depth, the impact of prints on other media is most visible in Renaissance maiolica (tin-glazed ceramics) and bronze plaquettes.  

Fifteenth-century Europe was a place of technological revolution, particularly in the parallel development of printed books and images. These developments transformed the ways in which verbal and visual information could be accessed, with radical implications on cultural, scientific, and artistic production. As easily produced multiples, prints traveled widely. They were frequently copied by artists and craftsmen and were a driving force in the revolution of the arts of the Renaissance. 

Small bronze reliefs, known as plaquettes, functioned primarily as refined ornaments or collectibles—a format influenced by ancient carved gems, coins, and statues—first appeared in Rome around 1440. As small, portable objects meant to be handled and privately enjoyed, plaquettes were similar to prints and often produced in or near important printmaking centers, such as Mantua, Bologna, or Venice. On view in the exhibition is Andrea Briosco's (1470–1532) plaquette Judith with the Head of Holofernes (early 16th century), alongside the print that inspired it, Judith with the Head of Holofernes (c. 1480), by a follower of Andrea Mantegna. Briosco responds to Mantegna's figural style by reducing it to a three-dimensional handheld object, creating an intimate, tactile encounter with the image. Also on view are three plaquettes by one of the masters of the medium, Moderno (Galeazzo Mondella, 1467–1528): The Flagellation, The Entombment, and Hercules and Antaeus (all dating from the late 15th to early 16th century).  

4969-007

Andrea Briosco, called Riccio, Judith with the Head of Holofernes, early 16th century, bronze; overall: 10.7 x 8.4 cm (4 3/16 x 3 5/16 in.) gross weight: 357 gr, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Samuel H. Kress Collection.

4969-008

 Girolamo Mocetto after Andrea Mantegna, Judith with the Head of Holofernes, c. 1500/1505, engraving, sheet: 30.9 x 20.9 cm (12 3/16 x 8 1/4 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Print Purchase Fund (Rosenwald Collection).

4969-009

Moderno, The Flagellation, late 15th–early 16th century, bronze//Dark brown patina; overall: 13.5 x 9.9 cm (5 5/16 x 3 7/8 in.) gross weight: 397 gr, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Samuel H. Kress Collection.

4969-010

Moderno, The Entombment, late 15th–early 16th century, bronze; overall: 1062 x 692.5 cm (418 1/8 x 272 5/8 in.) gross weight: 158 gr, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Samuel H. Kress Collection.

4969-014

Moderno, Hercules and Antaeus, late 15th–early 16th century, bronze//Very dark patina; overall: 7.5 x 5.9 cm (2 15/16 x 2 5/16 in.) gross weight: 60 gr, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Samuel H. Kress Collection.

Inspired by the availability of new pigments, glazes, and printed models, ceramics artists developed a style of decoration called istoriato that featured recognizable subjects and narrative episodes from classical and contemporary literature as well as biblical and ancient history. For the first time, pottery painters conceived of the surfaces of plates and vessels as a medium to depict stories in full color and vivid detail. Like prints, istoriato mirrored and visualized the interests and passions of the cultured elite while remaining accessible to a wider market. Painters in the principal cities of istoriato production—Faenza, Urbino, Pesaro, Gubbio—could respond to the most recent developments in contemporary art thanks to the availability of printed images created in major artistic centers. 

While artists in the above cities were early adopters of printed material as sources, those in Deruta, with notable exceptions, remained attached to the style and works of local painters such as Pietro Perugino (c. 1450–1523) and Pinturicchio (1454–1513) until the mid-16th century. One such exception, Dish with Hercules and Antaeus (c. 1490–1500)—a spectacular Deruta plate on view in the exhibition—depicts the interlocked bodies of the two subjects dynamically engaged in combat. One of the earliest examples of Umbrian istoriato, the Deruta plate illustrates how quickly artists could respond to Antonio Pollaiuolo's (1431/2–1498) innovative and dramatic compositions of the male nude body in motion even in relatively more conservative centers. 

4969-034

Giovanni Antonio da Brescia, Hercules and Antaeus, c. 1490–1500, engraving; sheet: 25 x 17.1 cm (9 13/16 x 6 3/4 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Rosenwald Collection.

4969-028

Workshop of Maestro Giorgio Andreoli, Shallow bowl with Hercules overcoming Antaeus, 1520, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica), overall (diameter): 24.8 cm (9 3/4 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Widener Collection.

4969-040

Cristofano Robetta, after Antonio del Pollaiuolo, Hercules and Antaeus, c. 1500, engraving on laid paper, sheet (trimmed to plate mark): 26.7 x 19.9 cm (10 1/2 x 7 13/16 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of the Arcana Foundation.

4969-064

Deruta, 16th Century, Dish with Hercules and Antaeus, c. 1490–1500, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica), diameter: 43 cm (16 15/16 in.), The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Robert Lehman Collection, 1975 (1975.1.1033) © The Metropolitan Museum of Art / Art Resource, NY

The exhibition is curated by Jamie Gabbarelli, assistant curator of prints, drawings, and photographs at the Rhode Island School of Design Museum. The exhibition is the culmination of Gabbarelli's research as the Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Curatorial Fellow in the department of old master prints from 2015 to 2017.

April 1–August 5, 2018. 

4969-001

Master of the Die after Baldassare Peruzzi, Envy Driven from the Temple of the Muses, engraving, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Rosenwald Collection.

4969-002

Andrea Briosco, called Riccio, Death of Marcus Curtius, early 16th century, bronze; overall: 7.8 x 6.4 cm (3 1/16 x 2 1/2 in.) gross weight: 121 gr, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Samuel H. Kress Collection.

4969-013

Master IO.F.F., The Death of Marcus Curtius, second half 15th century, bronze//Dark brown patina (rubbed locally), overall (shield-shaped): 6.1 x 5.9 cm (2 3/8 x 2 5/16 in.) gross weight: 31 gr, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Samuel H. Kress Collection.

4969-033

Lucas Cranach the Elder, Marcus Curtius Plunging into the Chasm, c. 1506–1507, woodcut, 33.5 x 23.4 cm (13 1/8 x 9 3/16 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Rosenwald Collection.

4969-046

Painter of the Milan Marsyas, Charger with Marcus Curtius Plunging into the Chasm, c. 1525/1530, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica); overall (height by diameter): 3.97 x 47.47 cm (1 9/16 x 18 11/16 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Corcoran Collection (William A. Clark Collection).

4969-015

Giovanni Bernardi, The Rape of Ganymede, 1532 or after, bronze, overall (oval): 6.7 x 9 cm (2 5/8 x 3 9/16 in.) gross weight: 85 gr, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Samuel H. Kress Collection.

4969-022

Workshop of Andrea Mantegna, Battle of the Sea Gods [left half], c. 1485/1488, engraving on laid paper, sheet (trimmed within plate mark): 28.6 x 42.6 cm (11 1/4 x 16 3/4 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund.

4969-023

Albrecht Dürer, The Centaur Family, 1505, pen and brown ink on laid paper, overall: 11 x 7.3 cm (4 5/16 x 2 7/8 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, The Armand Hammer Collection.

4969-027

Severo da Ravenna, Neptune on a Sea Monster, c. 1500/1509, bronze, overall: 45.6 x 26.7 x 20 cm (17 15/16 x 10 1/2 x 7 7/8 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Widener Collection.

4969-077

Marcantonio Raimondi, The Reconciliation of Cupid and Minerva, c. 1515, engraving, sheet: 21.9 x 11.8 cm (8 5/8 x 4 5/8 in.), The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Elisha Whittelsey Collection, The Elisha Whittelsey Fund, 1949 (49.97.137).

4969-029

Workshop of Maestro Giorgio Andreoli of Gubbio; painting attributed to the Painter of the Three Graces, Plate with the reconciliation of Cupid and Minerva, 1525, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica), overall (diameter): 26 cm (10 1/4 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Widener Collection.

4969-037

Workshop of Andrea Mantegna, The Entombment with Three Birds, c. 1490/1500, engraving, sheet: 45.7 x 35.3 cm (18 x 13 7/8 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Rosenwald Collection.

4969-038

Master IB, Sol (The Sun), 1528, engraving, 8.3 x 4.9 cm (3 3/16 x 1 7/8 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Rosenwald Collection.

4969-041

Agnolo Bronzino or Giulio Clovio after Michelangelo, The Fall of Phaethon, 1555/1559, black chalk on laid paper, overall: 40.7 x 27.2 cm (16 x 10 11/16 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Woodner Collection.

4969-050

Francesco Xanto Avelli, Plate with an Allegorical Scene with a Woman and a Putto, c. 1527/1530, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica), overall: 3.18 x 19.69 cm (1 1/4 x 7 3/4 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Corcoran Collection (William A. Clark Collection).

4969-051

The "In Castel Durante" Painter, Dish with Orpheus Charming the Beasts, c. 1520/1525, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica), overall: 6.03 x 25.72 cm (2 3/8 x 10 1/8 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Corcoran Collection (William A. Clark Collection).

4969-053

Francesco Xanto Avelli, Plate with Amphiaraus and Eriphyle (from the Hercules Service), 1532, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica), overall: 3.18 x 25.72 cm (1 1/4 x 10 1/8 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Corcoran Collection (William A. Clark Collection).

4969-054

Francesco Xanto Avelli, Plate with the Sinking of the Fleet of Seleucus (from the Pucci Service), 1532, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica), overall (height by diameter): 2.54 x 25.4 cm (1 x 10 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Corcoran Collection (William A. Clark Collection).

4969-056

Workshop of Domenico da Venezia, Plate with the Triumph of Bacchus, c. 1560/1570, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica), overall: 5.08 x 30.48 cm (2 x 12 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Corcoran Collection (William A. Clark Collection).

4969-057

Faenza, Plate with clasped hands, late 15th or early 16th century, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica), overall: 2.54 x 23.5 cm (1 x 9 1/4 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Corcoran Collection (William A. Clark Collection).

4969-058

Faenza, Plate with seraph, early 16th century, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica), overall: 3.81 x 23.5 cm (1 1/2 x 9 1/4 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Corcoran Collection (William A. Clark Collection).

4969-063

Marcantonio Raimondi after Baccio Bandinelli, The Martyrdom of Saint Lawrence, c. 1525, height: 43.1 x 57.5 cm (16 15/16 x 22 5/8 in.), Kirk Edward Long Collection.

4969-073

Agostino dei Musi, called Agostino Veneziano, Isaac Blessing Jacob, 1524, engraving, overall: 22.9 x 31.2 cm (9 x 12 5/16 in.), The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Purchase, Joseph Pulitzer Bequest, 1917, 17.50.16-74.

4969-076

Nicolaus Beatrizet after Michelangelo Buonarroti, The Rape of Ganymede, 1542, engraving, sheet: 42.5 x 27.8 cm (16 3/4 x 10 15/16 in.), The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Elisha Whittelsey Collection, The Elisha Whittelsey Fund, 1950 (50.567.25).

4969-089

Gian Jacopo Caraglio after Parmigianino, The Marriage of the Virgin, c. 1526, engraving on laid paper, sheet: 45.3 x 23 cm (17 13/16 x 9 1/16 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund.

4969-043

Deruta or Faenza, Basin with geometric patterns and dragon, c. 1480/1500, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica), overall (height by diameter): 4.76 x 38.42 cm (1 7/8 x 15 1/8 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Corcoran Collection (William A. Clark Collection).

4969-003

Master of the E-Series Tarocchi, Re (King), c. 1465, engraving with traces of gilding, sheet: 18.4 x 10.5 cm (7 1/4 x 4 1/8 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Rosenwald Collection. 

4969-044

Deruta or Faenza, Dish with Petrarch and Emperor Charles IV, c. 1470/1480, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica), overall (height by diameter): 6.35 x 38.1 cm (2 1/2 x 15 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Corcoran Collection (William A. Clark Collection).

4969-017

Master of the E-Series Tarocchi, Clio (Muse of History), c. 1465, engraving with traces of gilding, sheet: 17.8 x 10 cm (7 x 3 15/16 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund.

4969-032

Workshop of Maestro Giorgio Andreoli, Shallow bowl with the muse Clio, c. 1535/1540, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica), overall (diameter): 26.1 cm (10 1/4 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Widener Collection. 

4969-088

Workshop of Andrea Mantegna, Battle of the Sea Gods [right half], c. 1485/1488, engraving, sheet: 28.8 x 38.1 cm (11 5/16 x 15 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of W.G. Russell Allen.

4969-012

Attributed to Workshop of Alessandro Leopardi, Combat of Ichthyocentaurs, early 16th century, bronze//Black lacquer over light brown bronze, overall (diameter): 17.8 cm (7 in.) gross weight: 765 gr, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Samuel H. Kress Collection.

4969-019

Attributed to Niccolò Boldrini after Titian, Caricature of the Laocoön Group, c. 1540/1545, woodcut on white laid paper, sheet: 26.5 x 40.1 cm (10 7/16 x 15 13/16 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund.

4969-020

Jean de Gourmont I, Laocoön, engraving, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund.

4969-079

Marco Dente, The Laocoön, c. 1515–1527, engraving, sheet (trimmed): 44.3 x 32.9 cm (17 7/16 x 12 15/16 in.), The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Elisha Whittelsey Collection, The Elisha Whittelsey Fund, 1949, 17.49.97.122. 

4969-078

Marco Dente, The Laocoön, c. 1515–1527, engraving, sheet (trimmed): 44.3 x 32.9 cm (17 7/16 x 12 15/16 in.), The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Elisha Whittelsey Collection, The Elisha Whittelsey Fund, 1949, 17.49.97.122.

4969-065

Francesco Xanto Avelli, lustered in the workshop of Maestro Giorgio Andreoli, Dish with Laocoön, 1532, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica), diameter: 26 cm (10 1/4 in.), The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Robert Lehman Collection, 1975 (1975.1.1129).

4969-031

Workshop or follower of Francesco Xanto Avelli, lustered in the workshop of Maestro Giorgio Andreoli, Shallow bowl on low foot with the death of Laocoön and his two sons, 1539, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica), overall (diameter): 27 cm (10 5/8 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Widener Collection.

4969-087

Nicolaus Beatrizet after Michelangelo Buonarroti, Fall of Phaeton, 1540–1566, engraving, overall: 41.8 x 28.8 cm (16 7/16 x 11 5/16 in.), Harvard Art Museums/Fogg Museum, Gift of William Gray from the collection of Francis Calley Gray. Imaging Department © President and Fellows of Harvard College.

4969-014

Giovanni Bernardi, The Fall of Phaeton, 1533 or after, bronze//Medium brown patina, overall (oval): 9 x 6.8 cm (3 9/16 x 2 11/16 in.) gross weight: 116 gr, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Samuel H. Kress Collection.

4969-085

Unknown engraver after Michelangelo Buonarroti, The Dream of Human Life, c. 1540, engraving, overall: 44 x 30 cm (17 5/16 x 11 13/16 in.), Harvard Art Museums/Fogg Museum, Gift of Miss Ellen Bullard. Imaging Department © President and Fellows of Harvard College.

4969-084

Venice or Padua, Plate with Dream of Daniel, 1545, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica), diameter: 29.21 cm (11 1/2 in.), Detroit Institute of Arts, City of Detroit Purchase, Bridgeman Images.

4969-047

Workshop of Guido Durantino, probably by Orazio Fontana, Plate with Saint Paul Preaching at Athens, c. 1535, tin-glazed, earthenware (maiolica), overall (height by diameter): 6.99 x 34.61 cm (2 3/4 x 13 5/8 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Corcoran Collection (William A. Clark Collection).

4969-075

Gian Jacopo Caraglio after Raphael, Mercury and Psyche, c. 1520–1527, engraving, sheet: 25.3 x 17.7 cm (9 15/16 x 6 15/16 in.), The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Purchase, Joseph Pulitzer Bequest, 1917 © The Metropolitan Museum of Art / Art Resource, NY.

4969-080

Francesco Xanto Avelli, Pilgrim Flask with Mercury and Psyche, 1530, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica), height: 36.5 cm (14 3/8 in.), width: 22.4 cm (8 13/16 in.), The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, 48.1373.

4969-018

Agostino de' Musi, called Agostino Veneziano, The March of Silenus, c. 1520, engraving, 18.4 x 25.7 cm (7 1/4 x 101/8 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund.

4969-067

Nicola da Urbino, Plate with the March of Silenus, 1524, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica), diameter: 27.5 cm (10 13/16 in.), The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Robert Lehman Collection, 1975 (1975.1.1020) © The Metropolitan Museum of Art / Art Resource, NY.

4969-021

Marcantonio Raimondi after Raphael, The Massacre of the Innocents, c. 1511, engraving, sheet (trimmed within plate mark): 28.1 x 43.4 cm (11 1/16 x 17 1/16 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Print Purchase Fund (Rosenwald Collection).

4969-048

Nicolaus Beatrizet (?) after Marco Dente, after Baccio Bandinelli, The Massacre of the Innocents, 1540s(?), engraving on laid paper, sheet: 31.1 x 41.3 cm (12 1/4 x 16 1/4 in.), trimmed within platemark, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Ailsa Mellon Bruce Fund and Purchased as the Gift of Robert B. Loper.

4969-046

Francesco Xanto Avelli, Charger with the Massacre of the Innocents, c. 1527/1530, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica), overall (diameter): 48.58 cm (19 1/8 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Corcoran Collection (William A. Clark Collection).

4969-074

Marco Dente, Battle Scene, c. 1520, engraving, sheet: 22.5 x 36.2 cm (8 7/8 x 14 1/4 in.), The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Purchase, Joseph Pulitzer Bequest, 1917 (17.50.16-98) © The Metropolitan Museum of Art / Art Resource, NY.

4969-068

Painter of the Coal Mine Service, Dish with a Battle Scene, c. 1540–1545, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica), overall: 5.7 x 41.4 cm (2 1/4 x 16 5/16 in.), The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Friedsam Collection, Bequest of Michael Friedsam, 1931, (32.100.369).

4969-030

Attributed to the Painter of the Three Graces, in the workshop of Maestro Giorgio Andreoli, Flat plate with a battle scene, 1525, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica), overall (diameter): 30.3 cm (11 15/16 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Widener Collection.

4969-061

Gian Jacopo Caraglio after Parmigianino, The Adoration of the Shepherds, c. 1526, engraving, height: 20.5 x 23.8 cm (8 1/16 x 9 3/8 in.), Kirk Edward Long Collection.

4969-039

Gian Jacopo Caraglio, The Adoration of the Shepherds, c. 1526, bronze, overall (oval): 7.5 x 9.1 cm (2 15/16 x 3 9/16 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Eugene L. and Marie-Louise Garbáty Fund.

4969-082

Gian Jacopo Caraglio, Dish with the Adoration of the Shepherds, c. 1530–1540, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica), diameter: 26 cm (10 1/4 in.), The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, 48.1487.

4969-062

Gian Jacopo Caraglio, The Muses and the Pierides, 1505–1565, height: 24 x 38.6 cm (9 7/16 x 15 3/16 in.), Kirk Edward Long Collection.

4969-083

Unknown 16th Century, Plate with Muses and Pierides, 1500–1599, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica), diameter: 45 cm (17 11/16 in.), Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, Gift of John Gellatly.

4969-035

Albrecht Dürer, The Prodigal Son, c. 1496, engraving, sheet (trimmed to plate mark): 24.8 x 10 cm (9 3/4 x 3 15/16 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Rosenwald Collection.

4969-066

Workshop of Maestro Giorgio Andreoli of Gubbio, Dish with the Prodigal Son, 1525, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica), diameter: 28.3 cm (11 1/8 in.), The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Robert Lehman Collection, 1975 (1975.1.1105).

4969-036

Albrecht Dürer, Satyr Family, 1505, engraving on laid paper, sheet (trimmed to plate mark): 11.6 x 7.1 cm (4 9/16 x 2 13/16 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Rosenwald Collection.

4969-005

Pseudo Antonio da Brescia, Abundance and a Satyr [obverse], 1505 or after, bronze//Light brown patina, overall (diameter): 5.9 cm (2 5/16 in.) gross weight: 77 gr, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Samuel H. Kress Collection.

4969-002

Benedetto Montagna, Satyr Family, c. 1512/1520, engraving, sheet (trimmed to plate mark): 15.6 x 10.6 cm (6 1/8 x 4 3/16 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Rosenwald Collection.

4969-086

Urbino, Plate with a heraldic design after Hans Sebald Lautensack, c. 1552/1563, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica), overall: 4.45 x 24.13 cm (1 3/4 x 9 1/2 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Corcoran Collection (William A. Clark Collection).

4969-069

Probably by Gironimo Tomasi, Plate with Joseph's Robe Presented to Jacob, c. 1560–1575, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica), diameter: 27.6 cm (10 7/8 in.), The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of Mrs. Francis P. Garvan, 1974 (1974.286).

4969-052

Urbino, or Lyon (?), Molded dish with Joseph's robe being presented to his father, c. 1575/1600, tin-glazed earthenware (maiolica), 27.94 cm (11 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Corcoran Collection (William A. Clark Collection).

4969-006

Andrea Briosco, called Riccio, A Satyr Uncovering a Nymph, early 16th century, bronze, 6 x 7.2 cm (2 3/8 x 2 13/16 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Samuel H. Kress Collection.

4969-004

Benedetto Montagna, Apollo and Marsyas, c. 1515/1520, engraving, sheet (trimmed within plate mark): 16.2 x 11.2 cm (6 3/8 x 4 7/16 in.), National Gallery of Art, Washington, Rosenwald Collection.