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HONG KONG.- Phillips announced its 2018 Spring Sale of Jewels and Jadeite in Hong Kong on 28 May 2018 at the Mandarin Oriental Hong Kong. Featuring 156 lots, the sale will be led by a very rare and important unheated Kashmir sapphire and diamond necklace, with the sapphires weighing 52.50 carats. Equally enchanting is a magnificent pair of 14.59 and 12.54-carat Colombian Muzo no-oil emerald and diamond pendent earrings by Harry Winston, which features 23.84 carats of diamonds and an exceptional 21.20-carat unheated Sri Lankan Padparadscha sapphire and diamond ring. Estimated in excess of HKD 170 million, the sale will also offer a broad array of gemstones, signed vintage and period jewellery, important diamonds and jadeites of superb quality, accessible to seasoned collectors, fashionistas and tastemakers alike. 

In November 2017, Phillips achieved a 125% increase in value from the inaugural auction of Jewels and Jadeite in November 2016, and a 30% increase in May 2017. This sustained and steady growth demonstrates Phillips’ ability to build a thriving jewellery business and its expanding presence in this area in the region. 

Terry Chu, Head of Jewellery, Phillips Asia, said: “Phillips is delighted to offer a dazzling and delightful selection of jewellery this spring in Hong Kong, highlighting both contemporary and vintage examples with a modern sensibility in line with Phillips’ focus on art and design of the 20th and 21st centuries. We are very proud to be entrusted to present a very rare and important Kashmir sapphire and diamond necklace – the first to be offered at auction in the past decade, complemented by a very fine 13.13-carat Burmese ‘Royal Blue’ sapphire and diamond ring by Harry Winston. A line up of truly unique and vibrant pieces includes an Art Deco gem-set and diamond 'Tutti Frutti' double clip brooch by Cartier and a beautiful glassy jadeite cabochon and diamond demi-parure. Following our offering of a highly-coveted emerald and diamond ring in November 2017, this season we are pleased to offer yet another impressive 18.08-carat Colombian emerald and diamond ring by GRAFF, and a magnificent pair of 14.59 and 12.54-carat emerald and diamond pendent earrings by Harry Winston.” 

IMPORTANT GEMSTONES AND DIAMONDS 
The regal beauty of the sapphire has captured the world’s imagination for generations, heightened by the engagement ring of the Duchess of Cambridge, which previously belonged to Princess Diana. In response to such growing interest, Phillips will offer a very rare and important unheated Kashmir sapphire and diamond necklace, with the sapphires weighing 52.50 carats (estimate: HKD 17 – 23 million). Scintillating and classic, all of the 21 soft and velvety blue sapphires on this necklace hail from Kashmir, specifically in a valley amidst the Himalayan Mountains between Pakistan and China. This remarkable necklace sets itself apart by assembling a selection of the rarest sapphires, composed in a pleasant graduation accentuated by specially-cut diamonds. Each sapphire is cradled by petals of a tulip flower, resembling a treasure held closely in one’s palms. 

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Lot 627. A Very Rare and Important Unheated Kashmir Sapphire and Diamond Necklace, sapphires totalling 52.50 carats, diamonds together weighing approx. 35.25 caratsEstimate HK$17,000,000 - 23,000,000 ($2,200,000-3,000,000). Unsold© Phillips.

Twenty-one cushion-shaped sapphires, totalling 52.50 carats. Spaced by brilliant-cut and fancy-shaped diamonds, totalling approximately 35.25 carats. Platinum. Length approximately 405mm

(Twenty-one Sapphires) AGL report, numbered 1091315, dated 20 March 2018, all Kashmir (except for a 1.00-carat sapphire, undetermined), no indications of heating.

SSEF report, all Kashmir (except for a 1.11-carat sapphire, undetermined), no indications of heating. 

NotePhillips is proud to offer an exceedingly rare necklace assembling twenty-one unheated sapphires from the reputed mine of Kashmir in this auction. This is also the only necklace comprising a full collection of unheated Kashmir sapphires to appear in auction market in the past decade.

The difficulty in putting together a necklace with considerable number of precious gemstones is comparable to that of a jadeite bead necklace, which is considered the utmost form of jewellery among serious collectors. It takes the most acute sense and expert eyes to source a handful of well-matched gems with the same colour and clarity; but to be able to make such judgement, one must be presented the chance circumstances to encounter such gems in the first place. It is no surprise that such chances could be described as meagre if these gemstones all come from a legendary mine that was depleted nearly a hundred years ago.

All the blue sapphires on this necklace hail from Kashmir, specifically in a valley amidst the Himalayan Mountains between Pakistan and China. These blue gems were first discovered in the region in 1879 allegedly from a landslip. The colour of these blue stones is so unique and distinct that was best described by the late Dr. Eduard Gübelin: soft and velvety, scintillating yet bland at the same time; it is a clear, deep blue, enhanced by a gentle admixture of kingly purple. 

The amount of sapphires yielded from this area was steady to begin with, however, over the course of six to seven years, supplies of top-quality Kashmir sapphires rapidly decreased; in less than ten years, area known to us nowadays as the ‘Old Mine’ was completed exhausted. The short lifespan of the mines reaffirms the legendary reputation of sapphires from Kashmir. Not only are they some of the most beautiful and highly valued wonders of nature, but some of the most scarcely mined gemstones. 

Jewellery set with precious gemstones of reputable pedigree is greatly sought after by collectors and investors, this remarkable necklace sets itself apart by assembling a selection of the rarest sapphires, composed in a pleasant graduation accentuated by specially-cut diamonds. Each sapphire is cradled by petals of a tulip flower, resembling a treasure held closely in one’s palms. It stands as a testimony to the miracles of Mother Nature and Man’s spirit of perseverance in pursuit of perfection — when difficulties seem insurmountable and a mission appears to be impossible, this one-of-a-kind necklace proves us wrong.

Padparadscha sapphires belong to the same corundum family where blue sapphires and rubies are from. They made their royal début earlier this year when Princess Eugenie of York of the United Kingdom announced her engagement to Jack Brooksbank with an oval padparadscha ring. Coinciding with this special occasion, Phillips is offering an exceptional and rare 21.20-carat unheated Sri Lankan Padparadscha sapphire and diamond ring (estimate: HKD 6.3 – 7.3 million). A Padparadscha of over ten carats is an extremely rare occurrence in nature. The present oval example which weighs a stunning 21.20 carats, therefore bears exceptional calibre and merit. Certified to be of Sri Lankan origin and completely free of heat treatment, it displays a vibrant pink colour complemented by an orange hue. Its well-proportioned outline and pavilion make it even more desirable.  

A 21.20-carat unheated Sri Lankan Padparadscha Sapphire and Diamond Ring

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Lot 618. A 21.20-carat Unheated Sri Lankan Padparadscha Sapphire and Diamond Ring. Estimate HKD 6.3 – 7.3 millionUnsold. Image courtesy of Phillips.

One oval padparadscha sapphire, 21.20 carats. Pear-shaped and brilliant-cut diamonds in the surround, totalling approximately 8.00 carats. Platinum and 14 karat white gold. Size 6.

(21.20-carat Padparadscha Sapphire) Gübelin report, numbered 17097145, dated 14 September 2017, Sri Lanka, no indications of heating.
SSEF report, numbered 89417, dated 16 January 2017, Ceylon (Sri Lanka), no indications of heating. SSEF Appendix letter further states that 'A natural padparadscha from Ceylon of this size and quality is rare and exceptional.'

Note: The true beauty and charm of a padparadscha sapphire rests in its unique colour, or more precisely, colours. To befit the esteemed title of ‘padparadscha’, a sapphire must possess an orange and a pink hue at the same time, somewhat elusive in description, but hauntingly memorable to the eye. This unique chromatic combination is often compared to the sunset sky, and even more frequently to the blooming lotus flower (Nelumbo Nucifera ‘Speciosa), padma in Sinhalese, from which the name padparadscha was derived.

Known as the ‘Island of Gems’, Sri Lanka is the earliest origin known to mankind for the world’s finest sapphires. Gem deposits from this historical origin encompass almost every colour one’s imagination allows. For the same reason, Sri Lanka has also been the most prominent and a classic source of padparadscha sapphires throughout history, delighting gem connoisseurs with their cheery colours. 
According to Sanskrit and Sinhalese accounts, padparadscha were described as ‘ruby-like, resembling the fire and molten gold’, it has a reddish body colour. However in modern days --- lost partly in translation, partly in culture --- the colour that defines a padparadscha no longer leans toward red-orange or orange-red. In an article published by GIA in 1982, Robert Crowningshield clarified the laboratory’s stance on the gemstone, ‘it is the GIA’s opinion that this colour range should be limited to light to medium tones of pinkish orange to orange-pink hues.’ The trade nowadays agrees predominantly on this colour description, but remain divided on the tone, saturation and proportion of the two hues. This ambiguity becomes an integral part of a padparadscha’s enigma. 

Colour of preference is indeed a very personal choice, however, whether it is an orangy pink sapphire or a pinkish orange gem, a fine, clean and lively Sri Lankan padparadscha of over 10 carats is an extremely rare occurrence in nature. This oval padparadscha, weighing a stunning 21.20 carats, is one of such exceptional calibre and merit. Certified to be of Sri Lankan origin and completely free of heat treatment, it displays a vibrant pink colour complemented by an orange hue. Such a rare specimen is extremely hard to come by even at prestigious international auction markets. While a lot of coloured gemstones compromise their shapes and cut in order to retain maximum weight, this padparadscha possesses a well-proportioned outline and pavilion which makes it even more desirable. 
Few people know that padparadscha belongs to the same corundum family where blue sapphires and rubies are from. It is also among the most precious and attractive varieties of corundum. While sapphires and rubies are long known for their affiliation to kings and queens, padparadscha sapphire made its royal début earlier this year, when Her Royal Highness Princess Eugenie of York announced her engagement to Jack Brooksbank with an oval padparadscha ring. 

Just like the blushing cheeks of a bride-to-be, the colour of a padparadscha is a little less electric than a pink sapphire and a little gentler than an orange sapphire, filled with serenity that soothes and calms the eyes, and surely the heart of its blissful wearer.

An impressive 21.05-carat E / IF round diamond will also grace the sale this season (estimate: HKD 15 – 18 million). Its excellent cut, polish and symmetry are combined with an internally flawless clarity, exhibiting an alluring presence of exceptional brilliance, dispersion and sparkles, the finest visual quality of a colourless diamond.  

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An Unmounted 21.05-carat E / IF Diamond

 

Lot 619. An Unmounted 21.05-carat E / IF Brilliant-cut Diamond. Estimate: HK$15,000,000 - 18,000,000 ($1,900,000-2,300,000)Unsold. Image courtesy of Phillips. 

GIA report, numbered 2191057186, dated 15 February 2018, E colour, Internally Flawless clarity, Excellent Cut, Polish and Symmetry. 

Note: The beauty of a colourless diamond derives from its incomparable hardness, bestowing the stone an adamantine surface lustre and the most dazzling appearance after fashioning. An optimal visual balance of brilliance, fire and scintillation requires a meticulous cut proportions, polish and symmetry, which however, against the concern of maximum yield normally encountered by all cutters. This very diamond weighing over 21 carats is a rare specimen that sacrificed weight for ultimate glamour. Combined with an internally flawless clarity and colourless body hue, this diamond exhibits an alluring presence of excellent brilliance, dispersion and sparkles, the finest visual quality of a colourless diamond.

This Spring, Phillips Hong Kong will also present a charming 5.19-carat unheated Burmese Mogok pigeon's blood red ruby and diamond ring (estimate: HKD 3.8 – 5 million) and a very fine, matching pair of 3.50 and 3.24-carat unheated Burmese Mogok pigeon's blood red ruby and diamond pendent earrings (estimate: HKD 4.2 – 5.0 million). All of the rubies come from the Mogok Valley in Myanmar where the best examples of the stone are usually found, and are unheated with a rare natural “pigeon’s blood” vivid red colour - the best colour for rubies and therefore highly desirable. Flanked by brilliant colourless diamonds, the rubies’ intense and majestic red colour is highlighted, culminating in a sumptuous parade of such fiery and captivating talismans.  

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Lot 608. A Fine 5.19-carat Unheated Burmese Mogok Pigeon's Blood Red Ruby and Diamond Ring. Estimate HK$3,800,000 - 4,600,000 ($487,000-590,000)SOLD FOR HK$4,300,000. Image courtesy of Phillips.

One cushion-shaped ruby, 5.19 carats. Twelve pear-shaped diamonds in the surround and brilliant-cut diamonds on shank, totalling approximately 5.40 carats. Embellished by twelve rubies, together approximately 2.55 carats. Platinum. Size 6¼. 

(5.19-carat Ruby) Gübelin report, numbered 17111182, dated 30 November 2017, Burma (Mogok), no indications of heating, 'pigeon blood red' colour.

SSEF report, numbered 96547, dated 17 November 2017, Burma, no indications of heating.

Note: Mogok are yielding fewer and fewer rubies in recent decades, even more scarce are rubies from the region that weight over five carats after cutting and polishing. Demand has been insatiable, yet supply is scarce. What makes this 5.19-carat untreated Burmese (Mogok) ruby more precious is its colour. Certified to possess ‘pigeon’s blood red’ is veritably one of the finest rubies one could see on the market these days.

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A Very Fine Pair of 3.50 and 3.24-carat unheated Burmese Mogok pigeon's blood red Ruby and Diamond Pendent Earrings

Lot 654. A Very Fine Pair of 3.50 and 3.24-carat Unheated Burmese Mogok Pigeon's Blood Red Ruby and Diamond Pendent Earrings. Estimate HK$4,200,000 - 5,000,000 ($550,000-700,000)SOLD FOR HK$4,660,000. Image courtesy of Phillips.

Two cushion-shaped rubies, 3.50 and 3.24 carats. Twelve oval diamonds in the surround and two circular-cut diamonds atop, together 5.72 carats. Two pear-shaped rubies on hooks, totalling approximately 1.00 carat. 18 karat white and yellow gold.

(3.50 and 3.24-carat Rubies) Gübelin report, numbered 16111117 / 1 and 2, dated 29 November 2016, Burma (Mogok), no indications of heating, 'pigeon's blood red' colour.

SSEF report, numbered 87746, dated 20 September 2016, Burma (Mogok), no indications of heating, 'pigeon's blood red' colour.

The SSEF appendix letter states that these two rubies 'are characterised by an attractive and saturated colour in combination with a fine purity........a matching pair of natural rubies from Burma of this quality is rare and exceptional'.

(Twelve oval and two round Diamonds) Fourteen GIA reports, 0.22 to 0.49 carat, all D colour, Internally Flawless to VVS2 clarity.

Note: ‘Pigeon’s blood’ is a term used to describe the finest hue of a ruby. The colour red itself comes from the element of chromium that gives ruby its red body colour. What sets a pigeon’s blood ruby apart is the fluorescence effect – the gem takes in blue and green light and emits red. This red glow helps to mask the darker extinction areas on a ruby and further enhance the redness of the stone. Current pair of ruby earrings is a great example of the finest untreated Burmese rubies possessing a combination of the most sought-after ‘pigeon’s blood’ red colour and high degree of clarity.

BRANDED JEWELLERY 
An extraordinary selection of branded jewellery by remarkable jewellers will be offered this season. Among them, an ensemble of opulent and glamourous emeralds from Colombia will pique the interest of connoisseurs. An impressive 18.08-carat Colombian Muzo no-oil emerald and diamond ring by GRAFF (estimate: HKD 12 – 14 million) features a natural and no-oil radiant emerald with an enticing green colour and crystalline clarity. Weighing 18.08 carats, an auspicious number in Chinese culture, this gem is believed to deliver blessings of fortune and prosperity. 
 

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A Fine and Rare 18.08-carat Colombian Muzo no-oil Emerald and Diamond Ring, Graff

Lot 653. A Fine and Rare 18.08-carat Colombian Muzo no-oil Emerald and Diamond Ring, Graff. Estimate HK$12,000,000 - 14,000,000 ($1,500,000-1,800,000)Unsold. Image courtesy of Phillips. 

One cushion-shaped emerald, 18.08 carats. Flanked by two tapered baguette diamonds. Platinum and 18 karat yellow gold. Signed GRAFF. Size 5¾. With a signed box.

(18.08-carat Emerald) AGL report, numbered 1079823, dated 20 February 2018, Colombia, no clarity enhancement. Also with AGL Appendix Letter, stating that 'emeralds of such color and quality are considered to have originated from the Muzo mining district...Top-quality Colombian emeralds in excess of 18 cts are very rare.'

Gübelin report, numbered 18027106, dated 28 February 2018, Colombia, no indications of clarity enhancement.

SSEF report, numbered 98178, dated 7 March 2018, Colombia, no indications of clarity modification in fissures at the time of testing. Also with Appendix Letter, stating that the emerald 'possesses exceptional charcteristics and merits special mention and appreciation. [It] exhibits a remarkable size and weight...combined with an attractive green colour and fine purity. A natural emerald from Colombia of this size and quality can be considered very rare and exceptional.'

Note: Graff Diamonds was established by Laurence Graff in 1960 at the mere age of 22, a prodigy who came to shape the world of high jewellery for almost six decades. He was one of the first to position high jewellery as a retail business and developed this into a vertically integrated empire which is very rare in the jewellery industry. Graff oversees each stage of the production, from mining, cutting and polishing, design to execution, closely monitoring to deliver the level of excellence the House is known for. 

Emeralds pulled from the earth of Colombia have long been heralded for the exceptional colour and quality. Today, gem connoisseurs still agree to this very fact and Colombian specimens of intriguing colour and fine clarity demand sky-high prices. This is no surprise because no other place in the world possesses such geological environment for the formation of rough in such sizes and quality. Colombian deposits in the Cordillera Oriental were mined as early as in the 1500s but indigenous tribes. The host rocks are rich in vanadium and chromium which give the emerald its lush bluish-green colour, yet the high level of these two elements also causes internal stress in the crystal, resulting in lower clarity of emeralds. Thus emeralds of intense colour and superb clarity are exceedingly hard to find.

Only a connoisseur can full appreciate the rarity and chances for even one Colombian emerald of superb quality and impressive size to be formed. Not only does it require nature's blessings with the most suitable conditions, but also the technical expertise of a craftsman to turn the rough into a substantial gem. This emerald, endowed with the special qualities from its Colombian provenance, with a respectable size of over 18 carats and a well-proportioned cut, as well as the glorious setting of Graff, is certainly a remarkable jewellery masterpiece.

A magnificent pair of 14.59 and 12.54-carat Colombian Muzo no-oil emerald and diamond pendent earrings by Harry Winston (estimate: HKD 13.8 – 17 million) boasts two mesmerizing emeralds in lush green colour, suspended from surmounts with one of the most iconic and resplendent designs in the world of high jewellery - the Winston Cluster© whereby diamonds of various shapes are set at different angles with minimal platinum to heighten the scintillation. The diamonds, totaling 23.84 carats, on these earrings are D to F colour, graded from Internally Flawless to VS2, further accompanied by grading reports from GIA and letter from GRAFF that guarantee their superb quality.  

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A Magnificent Pair of 14.59 and 12.54 carats Colombian Muzo Emerald and Diamond Pendent Earclips, Earclips Signed Harry Winston

 

Lot 638. A Magnificent Pair of 14.59 and 12.54 carats Colombian Muzo Emerald and Diamond Pendent Earclips, Earclips Signed Harry Winston. Estimate: HK$ 13,800,000 - 17,000,000 ($1,800,000-2,200,000)Unsold. Image courtesy of Phillips. 

Two pear-shaped emeralds, 14.59 and 12.54 carats. Cluster tops set with twelve pear-shaped diamonds, totalling 23.84 carats. Platinum. Ear-pendants detachable. Earclips signed HW for Harry Winston and numbered 67522. With a signed box and a Harry Winston authenticity letter.

(14.59 and 12.54-carat Emeralds) AGL report, numbered 1089598 A and B, dated 26 January 2018, Colombia, no indications of clarity enhancement. Also with AGL Appendix Letter, stating that the emeralds 'are singularly distinguished and together make a pair of unique rarity...both exhibit an intense and saturated green color that is representative of top-quality stones from this auspicious source. Emeralds of such color and quality of consistent with gems that have originated from Muzo mining district.'

SSEF report, numbered 97572, dated 23 January 2018, Colombia, no indications of clarity modification. 

(Twelve Diamonds) Twelve GIA reports, D to F colour, Internally Flawless to VS2 clarity.

Note: Founded in 1932 by Mr. Harry Winston, the eponymous American jewelry house hails as the creator of the most prestigious and astounding jewels for over eight decades. Known as the ‘King of Diamonds’ and the ‘Jeweler to the Stars’, Harry Winston is synonymous to the rarest, the most remarkable gemstones of the highest quality. From diamonds to coloured gems of legendary pedigree, Harry Winston is reported to own the world’s second largest collection of historic jewels, second to the one of the British royal family. 

Mr. Winston started in the trade when he was fifteen and soon developed an eye for the finest with his passion for gemstones. As early as in the 1920s, his was intuitively aware of the changing taste of society’s most affluent players for jewels and decided to pursue a new and unique style utilizing components from old and antique jewelry. He believes that diamonds and gemstones should dictate designs, instead of the metal settings. This belief transformed into a tradition in the House which allows each stone on a jewel to interact effectively with light, resulting in a style that is sublime and magnificent. 

The two exceptional emeralds in lush green colour are suspended from surmounts with one of the most iconic and resplendent designs in the world of high jewellery, the Winston Cluster©. First devised by Mr. Winston and appeared in the 1940s, this unique idea of setting diamonds of various shapes at different angles with minimal and almost invisible amount of platinum was one of Harry Winston’s most revolutionary designs. The majority of diamonds on these earrings are D to E colour, Internally Flawless to VS2; each with a pleasing outline and good make, further accompanied by grading reports from GIA that guarantee their superb quality. These diamonds, of no doubt, resonate with the rarity of the two Colombian emeralds that are completely free of clarity enhancement. Moreover, they are certified to originate from the revered mining region of Muzo, where the best emeralds were mined for centuries. There is not a single element on this magnificent masterpiece that is short of opulence, glamour and grandiosity.

Harry Winston has a long-standing history with the world’s most famous emeralds, from the Stotesbury Emerald, the Dolores Sherwood Bosshard emerald necklace, to the recent world record-breaking purchase of the Rockefeller Emerald. The House guarantees that the finest emeralds shine and dazzle in the most unforgettable way on every occasion, epitomizing Harry Winston’s creative wisdom and scintillating elegance.

Modern Burmese mines yield very few sapphires of gem-quality, even fewer of which exceeds 10 carats after cutting and polishing. Also from Harry Winston, the present sapphire and diamond ring boasts an over 13-carat step-cut unheated sapphire (estimate: HKD 2.3 – 3 million) certified to be of “Royal Blue” colour, possessing the best colour of a sapphire. Despite the challenging step-cut that masks a gemstone’s fire in general, this sapphire shines with the most elegant and vivacious blue flashes, making it a highly collectable piece.  

A Very Fine 13-carat Step-cut Unheated Royal Blue Sapphire and Diamond Ring, Harry Winston

A Very Fine 13-carat Step-cut Unheated Royal Blue Sapphire and Diamond Ring, Harry Winston

Lot 637. A Very Fine 13-carat Step-cut Unheated Royal Blue Sapphire and Diamond Ring, Harry Winston. Estimate: HK$ 2,300,000 - 3,100,000 ($300,000-400,000)SOLD FOR HK$2,980,000. Image courtesy of Phillips.

One step-cut sapphire, 13.13 carats. Pear-shaped diamonds on side, totalling approximately 1.90 carats. Platinum. Sgined Winston for Harry Winston. Size 7.

(13.13-carat Sapphire) Gübelin report, numbered 18037062, dated 3 March 2018, Burma, no indications of heating, Royal Blue colour.

AGL report, numbered 1091228, dated 19 March 2018, Burma, no indications of heating and clarity enhancement.

Note: It is indisputable that every stone on a Harry Winston masterpiece is on its own a work of art. The step-cut sapphire from Burma mounted on this ring of classic design is no exception. Burma has been home to the world’s finest rubies and sapphires since ancient times, and its sapphires are particularly known for their superb, rich and vibrant blue hue, which is described as ‘Royal Blue’ in the trade. This name has since then become synonymous with sapphires of the highest caliber. 

Modern Burmese mind yields very few sapphires of gem-quality, even fewer of which exceeds 10 carats after cutting and polishing. This natural sapphire weighs over 13 carats, certified to be of ‘Royal Blue’ colour, is surely every collector’s dream. Despite the challenging step-cut that masks a gemstone’s fire in general, this sapphire shines with the most elegant and vivacious blue flashes, deeming it highly covetable. This ring brings together the celebrated name of Harry Winston and a superb Burmese royal blue sapphire, marrying classic elegance with outstanding pedigree.

Bvlgari’s fine pair of 9.07 and 8.09-carat unheated Burmese Royal Blue sapphire and diamond earrings (estimate: HKD 3.8 – 4.8 million) speaks volume with its boldness and splendor. Matching in shape and size, both sapphires are free from heat treatment and certified by SSEF to be “Royal Blue” in colour. Set with diamonds of superb quality, the importance of the two impressive blue sapphires is enhanced, radiating a saturated vivid blue glow with classic glamour and elegance.  

A Very Fine Pair of 9.07 and 8.09-carat Unheated Burmese Royal Blue Sapphire and Diamond Earrings, Bvlgari

 

Lot 570. A Very Fine Pair of 9.07 and 8.09-carat Unheated Burmese Royal Blue Sapphire and Diamond Earrings, Bvlgari. Estimate HK$ 3,800,000 - 4,800,000 ($485,000-600,000)Unsold. Image courtesy of Phillips. 

Two oval sapphires, 9.07 and 8.09 carats. Brilliant-cut diamonds in the surround, totalling approximately 7.50 carats. Platinum. Signed Bvlgari. With signed box.

(9.07- & 8.09-carat Sapphires) SSEF report, numbered 95576, dated 20 September 2017, Burma, no indications of heating, 'Royal Blue' colour.

Gübelin report, numbered 18031256/ 1 and 2, dated 9 April 2018, one Burma, one not determinable, no indications of heating.

Note: Volume, boldness and splendour are the essence of Bulgari's jewel, chanelling the fun and fearless character in every woman who are adventurous with colours and designs. The bombé form of this pair of earrings, set with diamonds of superb quality, exudes classic glamour and elegance whilst enhancing the importance of the two impressive blue sapphires. Bulgari built its reputation on the wide range of gemstones they hand-picked for each creation, often of the finest colour. This pair of sapphires with a saturated vivid blue glow is no exception. Aside from its visual beauty, these sapphires also reign from the prominent mines of Burma, where specimens of over 10 carats of such quality are exceedingly scarce. A single Burmese sapphire of this quality is hard to find, this pair of earrings brings together two of such rare gems in matching shape and size, both of them free from heat treatment and certified by SSEF to be 'Royal blue' in colour, is a remarkable occurrence.

VINTAGE AND PERIOD JEWELLERY 
Collecting vintage and period jewellery has become a current trend among seasoned collectors and fashionistas who desire unique, storied pieces. Phillips will present a unique Art Deco gem-set and diamond 'Tutti Frutti' double clip brooch by Cartier (estimate: HKD 1.4 – 2 million). Based on Indian influences and meticulously designed by employing gemstone materials from India, Tutti Frutti jewels form an assemblage of colours – mainly in red, green and blue - and gemstones, making it a signature Cartier design. Every Tutti Frutti jewel is truly unique, owing to the singular nature of the components and thus their composition - the present whimsical, polychromatic brooch is no exception. Designed and hand-made by Henri Picq, one of the most prominent Parisian workshops that executed gem-set platinum jewellery for Cartier in the early 20th century through to the late 20s, the versatile brooch can be worn as two separate clip brooches, demonstrating Henri Picq’s technical supremacy in platinum treatment and exceptional finesse in realising some of Cartier’s pioneering designs at the time.  

A Unique Art Deco Gem-set and Diamond 'Tutti Frutti' Double Clip Brooch, Henri Picq for Cartier Paris, Circa 1925

 

Lot 610. A Unique Art Deco Gem-set and Diamond 'Tutti Frutti' Double Clip Brooch, Henri Picq for Cartier Paris, Circa 1925. Estimate HK$ 1,400,000 - 2,000,000 ($180,000-250,000)Unsold. Image courtesy of Phillips. 

Fluted emerald beads, carved ruby and sapphire leaves, gemstone cabochons. Old European-cut and baguette diamonds, totalling approximately 5.00 carats. Platinum and 18 karat white gold. French assay marks. Signed Cartier Paris an numbered 0812. With maker's mark for Henri Picq. With signed box.

Note: Henri Picq was among the most prominent Parisian workshops that executed gem-set platinum jewellery for Cartier in the early 20th century through into the late 20s. They were known for their techinical supremacy in platinum treatment and exceptional finesse in realizing some of Cartier's pioneering designs at that time, such as the the first of the steel diadems in 1914 for the Romanian royals. Picq was also the responsible for the first Cartier 'Tutti Frutti' jewel, which was a bracelet in the form of an undulating branch of leaves and berries, incorporating carved stones and gemstone beads. This was exhibited at the infamous Paris Exposition Universelle in 1925 and marked the beginning of a chromatic feast in red, green and blue, which became the ultimate dream of every Cartier collector.

The emergence of what is now patented as 'Tutti Frutti' stemmed from Jacques Cartier's travels to the Far East from 1909 onwards, in particular India, from where he forged relationships with Princes and Maharajas who are in possession of important gemstones. He brought back to Europe a large quantity of carved emeralds, rubies and sapphires, which were assembled in a polychromatic style on jewels that evoked exoticism of empires far far away. This bold approach, seen as highly unconventional at the time because of the clashes of colours, would later becoming a signature Cartier style. It is important to note that every Tutti Frutti jewel is unique, owing to the singular nature of the components and thus their composition. No two Tutti Frutti jewels are exactly the same.

This brooch is particularly interesting for its asymmetrical layout, which was uncommon in the time of its production. Despite the irregularities of the carved gemstones, strict geometry was observed during the Art Deco period, especially when jewels come in pairs. The 'branches' on this brooch seem to mimic the organic nature of growth in a tree, some ending on flower buds (cabochons), others on blooming flowers (two fluted emerald beads). 

Completed with Henri Picq workshop mark (HP flanking an ace of spades) on both side of the clip brooches and the signature 'Cartier Paris', this double clip brooch is a superlative example of an iconic and unique Cartier masterpiece.

Also by Cartier, a natural seed pearl and diamond sautoir necklace (estimate: HKD 1.1 – 1.3 million) reflects the delicate craftsmanship from the early 1900s of the House. This long chain of natural seed pearl bead, linked by platinum wire with diamond millegrain setting, was created circa 1910 when chokers were no longer in vogue. The triumphal progress began in late 1920s when this form of jewellery particularly suited the new fashion of simple dresses of straight vertical line. Even without using large diamonds or gemstones, the superb design and brilliant skills by the House are enough to create the most striking jewels with exquisite tiny pearls that exude time-transcending style.  

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Lot 595. A Natural Seed Pearl and Diamond Sautoir Necklace, Cartier Paris, Circa 1910. Estimate HK$ 1,100,000 - 1,300,000 ($140,000-165,000)Unsold. Image courtesy of Phillips. 

Necklace and tassel of pendant set with numerous natural pearl beads, measuring approximately 3.31 to 3.69mm. Openwork plaques millegrain-set with numerous circular-cut diamonds, tassels suspending marquise-shaped and circular-cut diamonds, totalling approximately 8.00 carats. Embellished by seed pearls. Platinum. Pendant detachable. Pendant signed Cartier Paris. Length approximately 830mm. With fitted box.

(Eighty-six out of numerous Pearls) GIA report, numbered 6193058551, dated 29 January 2018, natural saltwater pearls, no indications of treatment.

Note: Founded in Paris in 1847 by Louis-Francois Cartier, The House of Cartier has a long and distinguished history of serving the glittering royal houses of Europe in the West to the opulent dynasties of Siam, Nepal and India in the East and never the least, the celebrities around the world. Cartier’s creations have always remained true to its original beliefs --- as an innovator in taste and fashion. As early as 1904, Cartier began producing abstract jewelry with geometric styling. This established the House as a pioneer of the modern style, not only within the field of fine jewelry, but also in the scope of art history. Jewelry is a form of art that you wear as a message, a declaration, an offering, or a talisman.

The present long chain of natural seed pearl bead, linked by platinum wire with diamond millegrain setting, reflects the delicate craftsmanship from the early 1900s of the House. The fashion of creating and wearing sautoirs started in 1910s, when chokers were no longer in vogue. The triumphal progress began in late 1920s when this form of jewelry particularly well suited the new fashion. It complemented simple dresses of straight vertical line elegantly, and was to become the most approved form of neck ornament of that time.

Cartier demonstrates how a beauty of a masterpiece lies with superb design and brilliant skills, even without large diamonds or gemstones; the House was able to create the most striking jewels with exquisite tiny stones that exude time-transcending style. This sautoir is an excellent example. For over a hundred of years, Cartier continues to create rare and imaginative pieces so beautiful and unique that they can only be associated with this esteemed French jeweler.

ESTATE JEWELLERY – The Collection of Betty Warner Sheinbaum – 
A Hollywood Jewel Box
 
Phillips has been entrusted with a collection of 17 jewels belonging to Betty Warner Sheinbaum, the youngest daughter of Harry and Rea Warner and heiress to one of the most successful motion picture and television dynasties in the world, Warner Bros. 

Betty Warner Sheinbaum was an accomplished artist, a voracious collector of contemporary art and a political activist alongside her second husband Stanley Sheinbaum. Her collection of jewels evokes a sense of the ‘Golden Age of Hollywood’, representing the changing landscape of styles which took place on and off screen from the early 20th century until the 1950s. An Art Deco diamond bracelet set with three oval cabochon rubies against a background of staggered baguette-cut diamonds (circa 1930s) is a perfect example. An enchanting Art Deco 6.21-carat Columbian emerald and diamond ring (circa 1925) and a 5.57-carat marquise-shaped diamond ring (circa 1912) are also featured in this collection.  

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 A Hollywood Jewel Box from the Collection of Betty Warner SheinbaumImage courtesy of Phillips.

JADEITE 

Any jadeite connoisseur will agree that colour, texture and translucency determine the quality and value of natural jadeites. This season, Phillips will introduce jadeite jewellery pieces with such superlatives, offering a prime opportunity to collect jadeite masterpieces. A very fine and superb glassy jadeite cabochon and diamond demi-parure (estimate: HKD 19 – 30 million) is set with 33 jadeite cabochons in superb quality, whereby their fine glassy texture was further heightened by the even colour and excellent clarity. The collection of perfect cabochons of matching quality and size is hard to come by, and to create a suite of jewellery or a magnificent necklace takes years of perseverance and immense luck, making this necklace a very rare find. Paired with earrings set with cabochons of comparable quality, this demi-parure is destined to be sought after by the most discerning collectors around the world.  

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Lot 629. A Very Fine Type A Jadeite Cabochon and Diamond Necklace, and a Pair of Matching Earrings. Estimate HK$19,000,000 - 30,000,000 ($2,400,000-3,800,000). SOLD FOR HK$19,300,000. Image courtesy of Phillips. 

(Necklace) Thirty-one jadeite cabochons, measuring approximately 13.06 x 11.12 x 4.26mm to 10.26 x 9.45 x 4.04mm; (Earrings) Two jadeite cabochons, measuring approximately 13.87 x 10.01 x 5.76mm and 13.72 x 9.68 x 5.65mm; Brilliant-cut diamonds on necklace and earrings, totalling approximately 17.10 carats; 18 karat white gold. Length approximately 420mm

(Jadeite Cabochons) Hong Kong Jade & Stone Laboratory reports, numbered KJ97843(1-10), KJ97839 and KJ97840, dated 14 March 2018, Type A jadeites, natural colour without any resin.

NoteColour, texture, translucency.

Any jadeite connoisseur will agree that these three attributes determine the quality and value of natural jadeites. Translucency depends greatly on texture. The finer the crystals and the denser the structure, the better light can pass through the stone to give a glass-like translucency. This is referred to as 'high water content' in the trade. Some common varieties of jadeite are 'pea', 'glutinous rice', 'golden silk' and 'ice', each depicting different structural density and water content, with 'glassy' jadeite being the most coveted variety of all. 'Glassy' jadeites possess extremely fine texture, resulting in a watery lustre and a translucency that is comparable to glass. The finest specimen displays an even, vivid green colour, which seems to glow with fluorescence from within.

It is said that good texture compensate for minor imperfections in jadeites, so if a jadeite is blessed with this foremost quality, it is very likely to be considered a top-quality jadeite; if it possesses a brilliant and saturated green colour on top of that, it is most definitely a rare gem. Jadeite is formed under very specific geological conditions which yields very little good-quality rough. The majority of jadeite boulders unearthed are low in translucency, full of fissures and inclusions; many requires artificial enhancement (especially for colour) in order to transform them into marketable products. It is exceedingly difficult to source even one high-quality material among tens of thousands of boulders. A fine jadeite cabochon, therefore, represents the superlative form of the best materials available. 

A jadeite cabochon with excellent colour, fine texture and high translucency is very hard to come by, to assemble a collection of such cabochons of matching quality and size and to create a suite of jewelry or a magnificent necklace takes years of perseverance and immense luck. 

This necklace is set with thirty-one jadeite cabochons in superb quality, their fine glassy texture was further heighted by the even colour and excellent clarity. Paired with earrings set with cabochons of comparable quality, this demi-parure is destined to be sought after by the most discerning collectors around the world.

The jadeite cabochon centered in the present impressive and fine jadeite cabochon and diamond ring (estimate: HKD 8.8 - 10 million) displays excellent colour, fine texture and high translucency. This jadeite double-cabochon measures 25.15 x 20.52 x 12.57mm, with an impressive size comes an even more impressive thickness. Flanked by two heart-shaped diamonds of superb quality, the cabochon’s watery lustre was contrasted with the scintillating fire of the white stones, heightening the elegance, simplicity and subtle beauty of natural jadeite. Such a gemstone possesses all the qualities of the best examples available in the present market.

 

An Impressive and Fine Type A Jadeite Cabochon and Diamond Ring

Lot 583. An Impressive and Fine Type A Jadeite Cabochon and Diamond Ring. Estimate HK$8,800,000 - 10,000,000 ($1,100,000-1,300,000)Unsold. Image courtesy of Phillips. 

One oval jadeite cabochon, measuring approximately 25.15 x 20.52 x 12.57mm. Flanked by two heart-shaped diamonds, 1.04 and 1.01 carats. Brilliant-cut diamonds on the shank and basket, totalling approximately 3.25 carats. 18 karat white gold. Size 6½.

(Jadeite Cabochon) Hong Kong Jade & Stone Laboratory report, numbered KJ97619, dated 5 February 2018, Type A jadeite, natural colour without any resin.
(1.04-carat Diamond) GIA report, numbered 6262813236, dated 28 August 2017, D colour, VS2 clarity, Excellent Polish and Symmetry.
(1.01-carat Diamond) GIA report, numbered 7261109496, dated 22 June 2017, E colour, VS1 clarity, Excellent Polish and Symmetry.