17 mars 2019

An extraordinary, fine and large inscribed famille-verte brushpot, Qing Dynasty, Kangxi Period (1662-1722)

An extraordinary, fine and large inscribed famille-verte brushpot, Qing Dynasty, Kangxi Period (1662-1722)

1

2

Lot 328. An extraordinary, fine and large inscribed famille-verte brushpot, Qing Dynasty, Kangxi Period (1662-1722). Diameter 7 1/4 in., 18.4 cm. Estimate: US$80,000 - US$120,000. Lot Sold 572,000 US$. Courtesy Sotheby's.

 the cylindrical form superbly enameled with a literati scene depicting a Tang dynasty poet-scholar leaning against the railing from the upper terrace of an elegant pavilion, gazing thoughtfully up at a full moon emerging from colorful cloud wisps, with two young attendants standing nearby, all within a lush, verdant setting of wutong, pine and plaintain trees amid rockwork, a two line poetic inscription on the reverse, signed Xin Yeqiao, and with a Zhu Shi Ju seal mark, coll. no. 189.

Provenance: Christie's London, 6th June 2000, Lot 357.
A. & J. Speelman, Ltd., London, 2001

ExhibitedThe Colors of Earth, Kangxi Era Porcelain from the Stamen Collection, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 2002, cat. no. 13.
Embracing Classic Chinese Culture, Kangxi Porcelain from the Jie Rui Tang Collection, Sotheby's New York, March 2014, cat. no. 12

LiteratureJeffrey P. Stamen, Cynthia Volk with Yibin Ni, A Culture Revealed, Kangxi-Era Chinese Porcelain from the Jie Rui Tang Collection, Bruges, 2017, cat. no. 30.
Yibin Ni, ‘Tang Poet Wang Changling Thinking of His Muse by Moonlight’, Readers Taste, (Mar. 2017).

Gazing at the Same Clear Moon: A Timeless Tribute to the Literati Aesthetic

The present brushpot, an essential item for a scholar, is aptly decorated with an aspirational depiction capturing a moment of poetic inspiration. The imagery is reiterated in the inscription by the Tang dynasty poet, Wang Changling (698-756), who was renowned for his atmospheric poems set in the far reaches of the empire. The inscription may be translated as follows: 

Standing on the high tower under the moonlight, I listen to the pure sounds coming from the Southern Mountains
Yesterday, the shadow of Chang’e appeared, and the sound of her subtle laughter was audible
Signed Xin Yeqiao, with two seals; Wang and Zhu Shi Ju

 As with many Kangxi porcelains, the present scene is directly inspired by a woodblock print illustration. The source for the imagery and poem is from Tang shi hua pu, ‘Illustrations to Tang poems’, compiled by Huang Fengchi, a scholar who was active early 17th century (fig. 1). Interestingly the poem as it appears on this vessel is not ascribed to the poet Wang Changling but signed Xin Yeqiao about whom no information has been recorded. An inscribed, famille-verte dish in the West Lake Museum, Hangzhou is also signed by Xin Yeqiao indicating the intriguing possibility that he may either have been an artist working at the Zhu Shi Ju workshop in Jingdezhen or perhaps the person who commissioned these pieces. 

3


Commentaires sur An extraordinary, fine and large inscribed famille-verte brushpot, Qing Dynasty, Kangxi Period (1662-1722)

Nouveau commentaire