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Lot 381. A personal sword of Shah Jahan with gold-damascened tulwar hilt, the blade Europe, circa 1600, the inscription and mounts, India, second quarter 17th century;33 ¾ ins. (85.7 cm.) long. Estimate USD 250,000 - USD 350,000Price realised USD 275,000. © Christie's Images Ltd 2019

The watered-steel blade with gold-overlaid inscription and marked with the royal parasol (chhattri).

NoteThe phrase Sahib Qiran Thani was one used by Shah Jahan on selected items that were for his personal use. For a brief discussion please see the entry under the Shah Jahan dagger, lot 387. A further example of the use of this title is on a ring mounted with a spinel and dated 1643 (V, inv.no.1023-1871; 1982, no.355, p.118). The royal ownership is further confirmed by the overlaid gold parasol, a sign of royalty indicating our tulwar entered the personal armoury of a Mughal emperor or of a direct relative.

The phrase Sahib Qiran Thani was one used by Shah Jahan on selected items that were for his personal use. For a brief discussion please see the entry under the Shah Jahan dagger, lot 387. A further example of the use of this title is on a ring mounted with a spinel and dated 1643 (V, inv.no.1023-1871; 1982, no.355, p.118). The royal ownership is further confirmed by the overlaid gold parasol, a sign of royalty indicating our tulwar entered the personal armoury of a Mughal emperor or of a direct relative.

The koftgari decoration of grapes hanging from interlocking vines forming a geometric lattice were in frequent use on hilts in the 17th century. Robert Hales attributes to the late 17th century two tulwars mounted with similar gold-decorated hilts, one with rows of blooming carnations and the other with repeating floral cartouches (Hales, 2013, p. 162). For a closely related sword please see the following lot.

Christie's. Maharajas & Mughal Magnificence, New York, 19 June 2019