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The early-1700s north façade of Château de Digoine—the recently restored Burgundy home of French collector and television producer Jean-Louis Remilleux—is framed by an English-style landscape. Photo: Pascal Chevallier

L’image contient peut-être : intérieur

A model of Digoine stands in a vitrine in the central salon; 18th-century alabaster urns are isplayed on bronze pedestals that once graced the storied Hôtel Lambert in Paris. Photo: Pascal Chevallier

L’image contient peut-être : personnes assises, table et intérieur

Resting beneath a mirror in the same room is a gilt-wood canapé that belonged to the 18th-century hostess Madame Geoffrin; the antique Sèvres statuettes depict literary figures. Photo: Pascal Chevallier

 

L’image contient peut-être : table et intérieur

The north dining room is furnished with an 18th-century Italian chandelier, a Francis Barlow painting of a cassowary, and Louis XVI chairs. Photo: Pascal Chevallier

L’image contient peut-être : table et intérieur

Remilleux’s study contains a Bernard II van Risenburgh cartonnier with lacquer panels and a small 18th-century-style chair (piled with books) from the collection of Arturo Lopez-Willshaw. Photo: Pascal Chevallier

L’image contient peut-être : personnes assises, table et intérieur

On one side of the double salon, mahogany tables used by Napoléon during his Elba exile stand on a carpet from Carlos de Beistegui’s Château de Groussay, which Remilleux once owned; the equestrian paintings include works by John Wooton, Eugène Delacroix, and Carle Vernet. Photo: Pascal Chevallier

L’image contient peut-être : personnes assises et intérieur

Terra-cotta medallions by the 18th-century sculptor Jean-Baptiste Nini hang in the Nini Salon. Photo: Pascal Chevallier

L’image contient peut-être : personnes assises, table et intérieur

The neo-Gothic library was built around 1825 for Aimé, Comte de Moreton-Chabrillan, a previous owner of Digoine. The English marquetry center table is surrounded by chairs made in 1807 for the exiled Louis XVIII of France, and the gilt-mahogany swan armchair, at left, is a circa-1800 design attributed to Jacob Frères. Photo: Pascal Chevallier

L’image contient peut-être : personnes assises, salon, table et intérieur

One of the château’s 15 bed rooms is outfitted with furniture and objects that belonged to the decorator Madeleine Castaing; Edmond Petit fabrics by Castaing were used for the walls and curtains. Photo: Pascal Chevallier

L’image contient peut-être : 1 personne, intérieur

Antique etchings line a second-floor hall; the settee in the foreground is George III, and the floor is paved with terra-cotta tiles. Photo: Pascal Chevallier

L’image contient peut-être : intérieur

Engravings of the Bonaparte family decorate an Empire-theme guest bath. Photo: Pascal Chevallier

L’image contient peut-être : intérieur

Anchoring another bedroom is a late-18th-century lit à la polonaise once owned by Madame Roland, a noted political activist during the French Revolution; Louis XV gilt-bronze sconces flank the mirror, and the antique bed side table features an integral screen for deflecting drafts or heat from the fireplace. Photo: Pascal Chevallier.