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7 avril 2023

Longquan celadon ware sold at Christie's, J. J. Lally & Co., New York, 23 march 2023

A Longquan celadon Guan-type vase, Southern Song dynasty (1127-1279)

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Lot 884. A Longquan celadon Guan-type vase, Southern Song dynasty (1127-1279); 7 in. (17.8 cm.) high, cloth box. Price realised USD 478,800 (Estimate: USD 40,000 – USD 60,000). © Christie's Images Ltd 2023.

The compressed pear-shaped body is raised on a wide ring foot and has a tall cylindrical neck that rises to a lipped rim. The vase is covered overall with a greenish-blue glaze suffused with a golden-brown crackle.

Provenance: J. J. Lally & Co., New York, no. 4541.

NoteA Longquan celadon vase of very similar form in the collection of the National Palace Museum, Taipei, is illustrated in Dynastic Renaissance: Art and Culture of the Southern Song – Antiquities, Taipei, 2010, p. 92, no. II-8. See, also, another similar example discovered in a Southern Song cache at Jinyucun, Suining, Sichuan province illustrated in Fulin sareta Nanso toji ten (Newly Discovered Southern Song Ceramics: A Thirteenth-Century “Time Capsule”), Tokyo, 1998, p. 24, no. 14.

A larger Longquan celadon vase of very similar form with a crackled glaze in the British Museum is illustrated by S. Vainker in Chinese Pottery and Porcelain from Prehistory to the Present, New York, 1991, p. 107, no. 78 and another comparable Longquan celadon example of this form in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, is illustrated by H. Tseng and R. Dart in The Charles B. Hoyt Collection in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Vol. II, Boston, 1972, no. 43.

The dating of the vase is consistent with the results of C-Link Research & Development Ltd thermoluminescence test no. 9548XE12.

A rare large lobed Longquan celadon basin, Southern Song-Yuan dynasty, 13th century

885

885

Lot 885A rare large lobed Longquan celadon basin, Southern Song-Yuan dynasty, 13th century; 11 1/4 in. (28.6 cm.) diam., cloth box. Price realised USD 35,280 (Estimate: USD 30,000 – USD 50,000). © Christie's Images Ltd 2023.

The basin has a slightly recessed center that rises to the petal-lobed cavetto below a rim of conforming shape, and the exterior has a central raised band. The basin is covered overall with a lustrous bluish-green glaze.

Provenance: J. J. Lally & Co., New York, no. 4863.

NoteLongquan celadon basins of this form and size are very rare. No other example of this large size with lobed sides appears to have been published, however smaller examples exist. A similar Longquan celadon dish, described as a “sugarcane-sectioned washer,” 4 1/2 in. (11.4 cm) in diameter, is illustrated by Zhang (ed.), Zhongguo chutu ciqi quanji - 6 - Shandong (Complete Collection of Ceramic Art Unearthed in China), vol. 6, Shandong, Beijing, 2008, p. 179. Another smaller Longquan celadon dish, 4 7/8 in. (12.4 cm) in diameter, discovered in the Sinan shipwreck, is illustrated in Special Exhibition of Cultural Relics Found off Sinan Coast, National Museum of Korea, Seoul, 1977, fig. 132.

A Longquan celadon hexafoil brush washer, Southern Song dynasty (1127-1279)

886

Lot 886. A Longquan celadon hexafoil brush washer, Southern Song dynasty (1127-1279); 4 1/4 in. (10.8 cm.) diam., brocade box. Price realised USD 94,500 (Estimate: USD 25,000 – USD 35,000). © Christie's Images Ltd 2023.

The washer has slightly flaring short sides that rise to a wide mouth divided into six lobes framed by notches in a raised band around the exterior rim and with corresponding ribs on the interior. It is covered overall with an even sea-green glaze, with the unglazed foot rim burnt orange during the firing

Provenance: J. J. Lally & Co., New York, no. 4883.

NoteA Longquan celadon brush washer of this lobed form and size, in the National Palace Museum. Taipei, is illustrated in Gugong Song ci tulu: Longquan yao, Ge yao, ji qita geyao (Illustrated Catalogue of Sung Dynasty Porcelain in the National Palace Museum: Lung-ch’üan Ware, Ko Ware and Other Wares), Taipei, 1974, no. 19. See, also, the Longquan celadon washer of very similar form in the Tokyo National Museum, published in Illustrated Catalogues of Tokyo National Museum: Chinese Ceramics I, Tokyo, 1988, p. 126, no. 502; and another very similar Longquan celadon brush washer in the Nakamura Kinenkan, Kanazawa, illustrated by G. Hasebe in Sekai toji zenshu (Ceramic Art of the World), vol. 12, Song Dynasty, Tokyo, 1977, col. pl. 78.

A very rare Longquan celadon Guan-type mallet vase, Southern Song-Yuan dynasty, 12th-13th century

887

887

Lot 887. A very rare Longquan celadon Guan-type mallet vase, Southern Song-Yuan dynasty, 12th-13th century; 6 in. (15.2 cm.) high, brocade box. Price realised USD 819,000 (Estimate: USD 70,000 – USD 90,000). © Christie's Images Ltd 2023.

The rounded body with high canted shoulder tapers very slightly towards the foot and has a cylindrical neck that rises slightly to a flared mouth rim. The vase is covered overall with a satiny greyish blue-green glaze suffused with golden crackle that falls short of the unglazed foot rim.

ProvenanceThe Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Alphonse Cohen, 1970s.
Christie's New York, 19 September 2007, lot 259.
J. J. Lally & Co., New York, no. 4385.

NoteA Guan mallet vase of larger size in the Freer Gallery of Art is illustrated in The World’s Great Collections: Oriental Ceramics, Vol. 9, The Freer Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., Tokyo, 1981, col. pl. no. 1, with description on p. 163. See, also, an example of larger size in the Umezawa Kinenkan Museum, Tokyo, illustrated in Nanso no seiji: sora o utsusu utsuwa (Heavenly Blue: Southern Song Ceramics), Tokyo, 2010, p. 34, no. 2.

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Lot 888. A Longquan celadon tripod censer, Southern Song dynasty, 12th-13th century; 5 3/4 in. (14.5 cm.) diam., cloth box. Price realised USD 94,500 (Estimate: USD 80,000 – USD 120,000). © Christie's Images Ltd 2023.

The compressed body is raised on three tapered feet and has a flat everted rim, with three narrow flanges beginning at a slight ridge on the shoulder and trailing down each leg. The censer is covered overall with a lustrous sea-green glaze of even tone.

ProvenanceSir Michael Moissey Postan (1899-1981) and Lady Cynthia Rosalie Postan (1918-2017) Collection.
Bluett & Sons, London.
Ray Thompson Family Collection, no. R.T. 24.
Dries Blitz, Amsterdam.
J. J. Lally & Co., New York, no. 3712.

Literature: Bluett & Sons, The Postan Collection of Early Chinese Ceramics, London, 1972, no. 17.

ExhibitedLondon, Bluett & Sons, The Postan Collection of Early Chinese Ceramics, 8-25 November 1972.

NoteThe shape of this censer, based on that of the ancient bronze ritual food vessel, li, was produced from the Southern Song into the Yuan period for the domestic as well as the export market. The numerous tripod censers retrieved from the Sinan shipwreck (1323) provide evidence that this shape was much sought after in Japan, the original destination of the ship's cargo, and where they have since been widely collected.

Longquan celadon censers of this classic form from the Qing Court Collection, now in the Beijing Palace Museum, are illustrated in The Complete Collection of Treasures of the Palace Museum - 33 - Porcelain of the Song Dynasty (II), Hong Kong, 1996, p. 136, pl. 122, p. 139, pl. 125, and pp. 140-41, pl. 126. Another slightly smaller censer of this form, also reportedly from the Qing Court Collection, now in the Percival David Foundation, London, is illustrated by M. Medley in The World’s Great Collections: Oriental Ceramics, vol. 6, New York, 1982, no. 37.

Other Longquan celadon censers of this form are in several museum collections, including one in the Tokyo National Museum in Oriental Ceramics, The World's Great Collections, vol. 1, Tokyo, 1982, no. 97. Other comparable censers include the example illustrated by J. Ayers, The Baur Collection: Chinese Ceramics, vol. I, Geneva, 1972, no. A99; and the censer in the National Palace Museum, Taipei, included in the Illustrated Catalogue of Sung Dynasty Porcelain, Taipei, 1974, no. 12. A larger example (19.7 cm. diam.), found in 1991 in Jinyu village of Nanqiong, Suining city, Sichuan province, is illustrated in Longquan Celadon: The Sichuan Museum Collection, Macau, 1998, pp. 210-11, no. 83.

A small Longquan celadon 'Twin-phoenix' mallet vase, Southern Song-Yuan dynasty (1127-1368)

889

Lot 889. A small Longquan celadon 'Twin-phoenix' mallet vase, Southern Song-Yuan dynasty (1127-1368); 6 1/2 in. (16.5 cm.) high, brocade box. Price realised USD 151,200 (Estimate: USD 60,000 – USD 80,000). © Christie's Images Ltd 2023.

The mallet-shaped body tapers slightly towards the foot from the canted shoulders, with the tall neck flanked by a pair of phoenix handles below the widely flared mouth with upturned rim. The vase is covered overall with an even glaze of soft sea-green tone which ends in an irregular line above the unglazed foot rim.

ProvenanceJ. J. Lally & Co., New York, no. 4032.

Note: The majority of this type of Longquan celadon mallet vases were made with two distinctive handles, either in the form of phoenixes, as in the case of the current vase, or in the form of fish. A very similar Longquan mallet vase with a pair of phoenix-shaped handles, from the Qing Court Collection and now in the Palace Museum, Beijing, is illustrated in The Complete Collection of Treasures of the Palace Museum - 33 - Porcelain of the Song Dynasty (II), Hong Kong, 1996, p. 110, no. 98. Another with fish handles is illustrated ibid, p. 110, no. 96.

A shard of a vase of this form excavated at Longquanxian is illustrated by J. Wirgin in Sung Ceramic Designs, Stockholm, 1970, fig. 30C-16, together with a larger vase of the same form, pl. 39I. A vase of similar size to the present example is illustrated in Special Exhibition of Cultural Relics found off Sinan Coast, National Museum of Korea, Seoul, 1977, no. 7. Other Longquan mallet vases with phoenix handles include one illustrated by M. Sullivan in Chinese Ceramics, Bronzes and Jades in the Collection of Sir Alan and Lady Barlow, London, 1963, pl. 80a; and one in Oriental Ceramics, The World’s Great Collections, Museum Pusat, Jakarta, vol. 3, 1982, pl. 130.

The dating of the vase is consistent with the results of C & C Authentication Laboratory Ltd. thermoluminescence test no. 8283RE04C.

A Longquan celadon tripod censer, Yuan-Early Ming dynasty, late 14th-early 15th century

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Lot 891. A Longquan celadon tripod censer, Yuan-Early Ming dynasty, late 14th-early 15th century; 3 3/8 in. (8.6 cm.) diam., reticulated silver cover, inner lacquered box, Japanese wood box. Price realised USD 25,200 (Estimate: USD 8,000 – USD 12,000). © Christie's Images Ltd 2023.

The cylindrical body is raised on three splayed bracket feet and is incised on the exterior with a double-line band. The censer is covered with a glossy sea-green glaze, with the interior and exterior base partially unglazed.

ProvenancePrivate Japanese collection.
Kochukyo, Tokyo.
Lam & Co., Hong Kong.
J. J. Lally & Co., New York, no. 4891.

Note: The shape of this censer originates from archaic bronze lian vessels from the Han dynasty (206 BC - AD 220). Ceramic vessels of this form are often molded with bow-strings around the body. A Longquan tripod censer of closely related form, also decorated with two raised lines, in the collection of the Sichuan Provincial Museum, is illustrated in Longquan Celadon: The Sichuan Museum Collection, Macao, 1998, pp. 146-47, no. 47. See, also, an example with triple bow-string bands from the Linyushanren Collection, sold at Christie's New York, 22 March 2018, lot 527.

A carved Longquan celadon stem cup, Yuan-Early Ming dynasty, 14th-15th century

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Lot 892. A carved Longquan celadon stem cup, Yuan-Early Ming dynasty, 14th-15th century; 5 1/4 in. (13.2 cm.) diam. Price realised USD 5,670 (Estimate: USD 2,000 – USD 3,000). © Christie's Images Ltd 2023.

The cup has rounded sides rising to a lipped rim and is carved on the interior with lotus scroll and on the exterior with four large petal lappets. It is raised on a tall, ribbed stem foot and is covered overall with a lustrous sea-green glaze.

Provenance: Galeria Internacional de Arte, Brazil, 1997.
J. J. Lally & Co., New York, no. 2533.

Similar Longquan celadon stem cups are in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, illustrated in The Charles B. Hoyt Collection Memorial Exhibition, Boston, 1952, p. 57, no. 227; in the Tokyo National Museum, illustrated in the Illustrated Catalogue of Tokyo National Museum: Chinese Ceramics II, Tokyo, 1990, p. 7, no. 19; and in the Seligman Collection, published by J. Ayers, The Seligman Collection of Oriental Art, Vol. II, London, 1964, pl. LXI, no. D187, described on pp. 90-91. See, also, examples in the British Museum, London, of similar form without the lotus scroll on the exterior, illustrated by R. Harrison-Hall in Catalogue of Late Yuan and Ming Ceramics in the British Museum, London, 2001, pp. 463-464, nos. 16:2-16:5. 

A Longquan celadon tripod bulb bow, Yuan-Early Ming dynasty, late 14th-early 15th century

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Lot 893. A Longquan celadon tripod bulb bow, Yuan-Early Ming dynasty, late 14th-early 15th century; 12 1/4 in. (31 cm.) diam. Price realised USD 4,410 (Estimate: USD 4,000 – USD 6,000). © Christie's Images Ltd 2023.

The compressed body is raised on three curved mask supports and is carved around the exterior with the Eight Trigrams (bagua) between bands ofbosses. The whole is covered in a glaze of rich sea-green color ending unevenly on the interior around a molded floral medallion in the unglazed center.

ProvenanceCollection of Captain S. N. Ferris Luboshez (1896-1984), Washington D.C.
J. J. Lally & Co., New York, no. 2907.

Note: A Longquan celadon bulb bowl of the same design from the Eumorfopoulos Collection, now in the British Museum, was included in the International Exhibition of Chinese Art, London 1935-36, and illustrated in the Catalogue, no. 1325, and also illustrated by R. L. Hobson in the Eumorfopoulos Collection Catalogue, Vol. II, pl. XXXVI, no. B136. See, also, another example of this type with similar peony sprig impressed in the unglazed center and with the Eight Trigrams carved around the sides, also in the British Museum, illustrated by J. Harrison-Hall, Ming Ceramics, London, 2001, p. 495, no. 16:87, where it is dated Yuan to early Ming dynasty, c. 1300-1400.

A rare Longquan celadon vase, hu, Ming dynasty, 15th century

894

Lot 894. A rare Longquan celadon vase, hu, Ming dynasty, 15th century9 1/2 in. (24.1 cm.) high, Japanese lacquered wood box. Price realised USD 40,320 (Estimate: USD 20,000 – USD 30,000). © Christie's Images Ltd 2023.

Of pear shape, the vase is molded with a pair of lug handles that flank the neck and is raised on a tall splayed foot. It is covered overall with a crackled olive-green glaze that ends above the foot rim.

ProvenanceJ. J. Lally & Co., New York, no. 4732.

Note: The simple, elegant shape of this vase, with no carved decoration, is rare. A Longquan celadon pear-shaped bottle vase with similar hollow tubular handles and wide foot rim, incised with a Xuande (1426-1435) reign mark on the recessed base, in the Freer Gallery of Art, is illustrated in The World’s Great Collections: Oriental Ceramics, vol. 9, The Freer Gallery of Art, Washington D.C., Tokyo, 1981, pl. 81.

Christie's. J. J. Lally & Co.New York, 23 march 2023

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