02 août 2014

Blue Splashware Cup. Unknown, Roman, A.D. 1–100

Blue Splashware Cup. Unknown, Roman, A.D. 1–100. Free-Blown Glass, 4 13/16 in. high x 5 11/16 in. diam. 2003.290. The J. Paul Getty Trust © J. Paul Getty Trust. In the environs of Jerusalem, in about 50 B.C., glassmakers discovered they could inflate glass into a bubble at the end of a tube. This new glassblowing technique allowed glassmakers to produce vessels so quickly and cheaply that glass containers began to replace clay ones for household use. Blown-glass vessels were decorated using a variety of techniques—pinching,... [Lire la suite]
Posté par Alain Truong à 22:46 - - Commentaires [0] - Permalien [#]
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02 août 2014

Cast Glass. Amber Bowl with White Ridges. Unknown, Roman, A.D. 1–100

Amber Bowl with White Ridges. Unknown, Roman, A.D. 1–100. Glass, 4 1/16 in. diam. 2003.475. The J. Paul Getty Trust © J. Paul Getty Trust. Casting is a technique of pouring hot glass into a mold. After the glass cools, glassmakers use various grinding and cutting techniques to refine the vessel's form and decoration. Decorative patterns are sometimes cut into the sides with a cutting wheel. Bowls were the most common cast vessels. Pendants, inlays, and other small objects were also created using this technique. This bowl has two... [Lire la suite]
Posté par Alain Truong à 22:36 - - Commentaires [0] - Permalien [#]
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02 août 2014

Mosaic Glass in the J. Paul Getty Trust

Bowl with Blue and White Canes. Unknown. Greek or Roman, 100–1 B.C. Glass, 2 1/16 in. high x 4 in. diam. 2004.24. The J. Paul Getty Trust © J. Paul Getty Trust. Mosaic glass vessels are among the most colorful ancient containers. They were formed by fusing numerous slices or ribbons (lengths) of cane in molds until they melted together into a swirl of colors, as seen on this blue and white bowl.Multicolored canes and figural compositions for plaques and beads were made by layering different colors and manipulating them into... [Lire la suite]