8

Koch, who plays the violin on a grid, probably Frankfurt am Main, 1st Quarter of the 18th Century. Baroque pearls, gold, enamel, silver, gold, diamonds, iron. H with pedestal 12.2 cm, Base: 5.3 x 5.3 cm. VI 88. Green Vault © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 

With a broad smile on his face fidelt the exuberant chef who has stretched his short leg into supposedly graceful pose of himself, fervently on his gridiron. The quirky character whose stocky body is made from a pear-shaped pearl, wearing an elegant, blue and green-gold striped costume and a green, wide-brimmed hat. She is one of the few Dresdner Perlpretiosen, for which the term "grotesque figure" in the strict sense is true. The unusual design goes back to a 1616 article published in Journal of the Florence etching sequence "Varie Figure Gobbi" by Jacques Callot (1592-1635). Besides the dancing dwarf with bottle and cup (VI, 97), the chef is the only Perlfigur the Green Vault, which is linked directly to motivic Callot. However, in the perlenen cooking Unlike the rather pensive-looking form of printmaking are the role model oversubscribed, mask-like facial features in the foreground, highlighting the caricaturing train more. Also, the figure by the attention to detail: from the small objects in the addition of beads is monstrous - the canteen and a small, drooping of the shoulder Goose - puts. The curved base has all four sides to form plaques with monochrome painting on a pink background. On the front, there are ten dancing and music-making putti around the Priaposherme, the statue of Asia Minor fertility god Priapus, rally, while the side and rear walls fruit horns and garlands, emblems of fertility play. These and numerous other Perlfiguren was acquired by the resident in Frankfurt Huguenot jeweler Guillaume Verbecq.

2

Merry winery, probably Frankfurt am Main, 1st Quarter of the 18th Century. Baroque pearls, gold, enamel, silver, partially gilt, diamonds, emeralds, rubies, sapphire, amethyst, carnelian, glass. H 8.8 cm, W 6.8 cm, D 4.9 cm. VI 100. Green Vault. © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 

The apparently slightly drunk wine, holding two clusters of amethyst and carnelian in the right hand, catching up with the sickle from far to cut more fruit. At the same moment makes himself, unnoticed by him, a curious cat to the well-filled basket on his back approach. Five baroque pearls forming body, arms and legs of the winemaker, who also wears a cap from an irregularly shaped, flat pearl formations on the head. The green and blue striped skirt and the stockings, combined with diamonds, remember to also acquired by the Frankfurt merchant Guillaume Verbecq Koch (VI, 88). However, in contrast to those very grotesque-conceived character of the wine represents a much less dramatic presentation.Even the figure of the rectangular base, which determines the cooking as in many other Perlpretiosen Verbecq of the face side is missing. Instead, it is applied to more visibility, because only by turning the piece opens up the list of the cheeky cat, secretly plundering the basket. With great care, the fine mesh of the basket is made, allowing glimpses of the therein, green enameled vine leaves.

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Samson Slaying the Lion, probably Dresden, 1720-1730. Baroque pearls, gold, enamel, diamonds, emeralds, jasper, rock crystal. 10.7 x 8.5 x 7.1 cm. VI 107. Green Vault. © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 

In the Old Testament it is described how the young Samson was attacked on the way to courting of a lion: "And when they came to the vineyards of Timnath, behold, a young lion roared against him: and the Spirit of the Lord came mightily upon. him, and he rent him as he would have rent a kid, and he had nothing in his hand. " The Israelite Samson became a symbol for god inspired, superhuman strength through these and other actions. In contrast to the ancient hero Heracles, who shares with the motif of the lion Samson Vanquisher and by his actions eventually ascends to Olympus, but the story of Samson also served as a warning to the vulnerability of the man through the lists of women. The Perlfigur was purchased on Easter fair of the year 1730 in Leipzig for the Green Vault. The master of this late Perlpretiose remained unnamed. He described Samson's victory over the king of beasts in a form that could be interpreted as a fight of Heracles with the Nemean lion. The group of figures standing on an elongated eight passigen plate of gray-brown jasper. Occupied base on the emerald can be found on the sides the cardinal Christian virtues and a woman riding that probably represents the perishable Dalia. The narrow sides show animal combat scenes. The group of figures is quite likely from the same master as the Galanteriewarenhändler (VI, 89) and the Swiss Guard (VI 112). With the latter, it combines both the somewhat schematic figure proportions as well as the physiognomy of the head with flowing hair and goatee. This is typical of this master in the expressive emphasis to the eyes sunken small diamonds particularly clear. Despite the ornate design of Perlfiguren and jeweled base this masterpiece of the early 30s lack the artistic empathy for the specific drama of the event.

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Galanteriewarenhändler, probably Dresden to 1720-1730. Baroque pearls, gold, enamel, silver, diamonds, emeralds, rubies, glass. 13.3 x 9.3 x 6.5 cm. VI 89Green Vault. © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 

A hitherto unknown gold workers can be attributed in part from significant three Perlfiguren format that probably all came against 1730 in the Green Vault. Besides the "gallantry dealer" is this to Samson Slaying the Lion (VI, 107) and a Swiss guard (VI 112). Travelling road or represented at markets and fairs dealer that offered luxury items, were part of the late Baroque economic system. Fancy but were also part of the repertoire of the royal "Development", held on the occasion of court festivities. In these so-called Mercerien found distributors of luxury goods their real audience. Members of the court nobility played in this context, but also once the trader. In the present Galanteriehändler it seems to be around such a representative of the first object in the mask of a man's trade. In his belly, he offers shop in miniatures to small items. These include a mirror, a pair of scissors, a pair of glasses, buckles, and a bell. The Perlfigur Galanteriewarenhändlers of the container itself but was also usable for luxury items. Hidden in the upper part of the base is a drawer of knives and scissors, a small, narrow box and an ear spoon with needle lie. These hygiene products were also ornamented with precious gems and enamel as the entire base area of Perlfigur. The base of all three Perlfiguren are of high quality craftsmanship. But the unknown goldsmith did not have the sophistication and artistic sensibility of a Girardet or Kohler. The rather schematic faces appear through the diamond in her eyes now black mask-like oxidized silver settings yet. Another Stileigentümlichkeit are painted with the checkered black and white floor tiles fields.

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Swiss Guard with halberd and "Tieger-Hündgen", probably Dresden to 1720-1730. Baroque pearl, gold, silver, gold, enamel, diamonds, emeralds, rubies, sapphires13.3 x 9.3 x 6.5 cm16.3 x 7.8 x 6.0 cm. VI 112Green Vault. © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 

The Swiss Guard has made his halberd as members of Trabant Garde a prince. Duly he stands, parade down the weapon in his right hand, the left against the hips in a blue dress uniform with gold trimmings. In front of him sits a small, almost caricature-like appearing "Tieger = Hündgen" a Dalmatian with head and back of pearls. The guardsman, who turns his head slightly to the right, has a beaded chest and pants and is adorned with a lush patch of small diamonds that cover in dense rows, especially the sleeves. The parade soldier stands on a typical for this area of goldsmiths checkered past flower tiles. The compact base is made of gilded silver with rubies, emeralds and sapphires of high quality. The rather large gems are integrated into the colored enameled ornament from late baroque strapwork and festoons. In the Hermitage in St. Petersburg, there are two other Swiss Guards and a scissors-grinder, who also come from the workshop of the gold worker. The two satellites of the princely Hermitage differ from the Dresden pieces only by the shape of the base, and by details of the less expensive clothing. Typical of the unknown master face shape with inlaid in a silver setting diamond eyes, the narrow waist of the beads and the overall gesture of the man parade step were repeated in exactly two soldiers.

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Dwarf grenadier. Johann Heinrich Köhler (jeweler), Dresden, early 18th Century. Baroque pearl, gold, enamel, silver, gold, emeralds, rubies, diamonds. H 13.1 cm, W 5.2 cm, depth 5.2 cm. Green Vault, VI 85© Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 

Johann Heinrich Köhler, who was recorded in 1701 in the Dresden goldsmiths' guild in 1718 and appointed to the court jeweler by August the Strong, to the fascinating topic of Perlfiguren he omnibus well as design elements in two of his magnificent clocks dedicated. The Green Vault secures five jeweler sculptures, which are characterized by the high artistic quality and superior implementation of various topics. The dwarf standing at attention as a grenadier, the grenadier cap is reminiscent of a dunce cap, appears to us as a caricature of a soldier. The representative uniform stands in contrast to the ostentatious sullen look of clumsy looking gnomes.

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Halberdier with dog, probably Frankfurt am Main, around 1700-1705. Baroque pearls, gold, enamel, silver, gilded, rubies, emeralds, diamonds, steel. H 16.0 cm, W 7.5 cm, D 5.4 cm. Green Vault, VI 111© Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 

he figurine already listed as a "Swiss" in the inventory of 1725 is a Swiss guardsman. The bearded soldier presents himself in a self-assured pose, accompanied by his dog. His costume corresponds to that of the Swiss guardsmen at the French court, at which one oriented himself also in Dresden. After the 1660 established by Johann Georg I Swiss Guard 1680 was abolished for reasons of economy again, August the Strong tried again in 1701, to recruit native Swiss for an infantry regiment and a Catholic bodyguard of the Polish court. He followed in the model of the Brandenburg-Prussian court, where Frederick III. set new standards. The traditional bodyguard, which was first erected in 1505 by Pope Julius II in the Vatican, formed an important part of the court ceremonial. Their mission was to protect the members of the royal family and escort them on trips or festive occasions, as well as to pay their respects to official guests. The enamel-painted front of Verbecq's signature pedestal comments on the figure of the halberdier. It opens the view to the porch of a stately building, where on a table in the foreground a salvaged money bag lies. The caption "Point d'argent, Point de Suisse" (translating as "no money, no commodity"), which appears above the scene, alludes to the costliness of the representative Swiss Guard. Possibly hiding in it but also a side blow on the embarrassing undertakings of Baron le Jay.

3

Dancing Dwarf, probably Frankfurt, before 1706. Baroque pearls, gold, enamel, silver, gold, diamonds. H 8.6 cm, Base: 3.6 x 3.6 cm. Green Vault, VI 97. © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 

Irregularly grown "baroque pearls" winged human imagination since time immemorial. They provided both inspiration and material basis for the small statuettes made of gold, enamel and precious stones "with a body of Perl". The creativity of the artist who joined the humped shapes of the monstrous beads in associative way with figurative motifs were no limits. The spectrum of Perlfiguren includes animals, mythical creatures, but also harlequins, soldiers, beggars, saints and gods. With a total of 57 pieces of the Green Vault has the world's largest population of this, by 1700 many princely collectors popular gems. Most important supplier for August the Strong, who filled the console of his little corner cabinet with the jeweler sculptures, Guillaume was Verbecq. Although we find the name of the Huguenot jeweler in the accounting records of other princely courts, little is known about his person.Since he acquired works of art have very disparate character, he is primarily, if not exclusively be been working as a dealer. The actual author of the gems purchased by him therefore remain in the dark. For the dwarfs who coined the term "grotesque figures", the artists were primarily stimulate the graphic work Jacques Callot, which they call the silent tragedy of the Callotschen models usually sounds comical.

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Camel with two moors, probably Frankfurt am Main, 1700-1705. Baroque pearls, gold, cold painted, enamel, silver, diamonds, emeralds. H 12.3 cm, W 5.1 cm, depth 3.5 cm. Green Vault, VI 116.  © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 

On the Dromedary, whose hump is visibly formed from a large, bumpy bead, a small perched Mohr. He held the animal originally with golden reins in check. A second, also clad with a diamond-studded loincloth Mohr has settled at the foot of the tall desert animal. He heads over from the plastic to the email group painting the base front, which focuses on the preciousnesses in a larger context: A person sitting in front of a palm tree there Mohrin presents the rich treasures of their country. It is surrounded by numerous chests, from which valuable jewelery - gemstones, jewelry, silver vessels and painted porcelain - revealing flashes. The coins lying on the ground and scrolls allude to trade in the coveted exotic treasures that arrived by sea in the distant Europe. Not coincidentally holds the Mohrin in both hands the beads, their bizarre mutations of the artists associated with the body forms a dromedary. Surprisingly, only a few centimeters secures the large, decorated with fine enamel decoration suitcase on the right side of the animal three tiny gold vial. This detail Perlpretiose connects with the larger sized tortoiseshell box with camel riders (VI, 230), the two cases usable - and certainly used - pose perfume bottles. The beads dromedary proves to be a detached miniature-like execution of the purpose of such a representative treasury piece, depicting a toilet as artistically accomplished as small sculptures.

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Breeding swan; emblem of the county Stormann, probably Copenhagen to 1700-1705. Baroque pearl, small pearls, gold, enamel, rubies, diamonds. 4.2 x 7.5 x 5.0 cm. VI 83 g. Green Vault. © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 

August the Strong had the largest collection of Perlfiguren, which sheds light on the particular fondness that monarch for those intimate testimonies of fine jewelery. With a total of 57 Perlpretiosen the Green Vault, therefore, has still the most comprehensive inventory of this kind, the attribution of Perlfiguren to certain goldsmiths is often difficult, as in the case of the "brooding swan", which first performed in a specification in 1706 will. This lists a number of gems that have been spent, given the massive threat posed by the Swedish Army in the Great Northern War to pledge to Hamburg in 1714 and only re-triggered. The White Swan early on in the collection of Augustus the Strong valuables is thus detectable reveals himself through the golden crown around the neck as the emblem of the then Kingdom of Denmark to the corresponding county Stormarn. A very similar Perlfigur (Rosenborg Castle, Copenhagen) was owned by Princess Charlotte Amalie, the daughter of King Frederik IV of Denmark. It is possible that at Dresdner preciousnesses to an ingenious gift Frederik to his cousin and ally Augustus the Strong, where it went to the kingdom during the Northern War and the tighter integration of Holstein parts of the country.

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Turtle. German, probably around 1700-1705. Baroque pearl, gold, enamel, diamonds, timber. H 3.4 cm, W 3.4 cm, D 2.6 cm. VI 83 k. Green Vault. © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 

Together with two other very similar copies (83h VI and VI 83 i) the turtle appears on a list of 102 treasures die1706 moved to Hamburg in 1714 and were re-triggered. It is in all three animals to miniature-like examples of so-called Perlfiguren of monstrous overgrown beads ("baroque pearls"), gold, precious stones and enamel. With 57 pieces, the Green Vault has the world's largest collection of these remarkable late Baroque gallantry.

15

Turtle. German, probably around 1700-1705. Baroque pearl, gold, enamel, diamonds, timber. H 3.4 cm, W 3.0 cm, D 2.3 cmVI 83 i. Green Vault. © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 

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 Turtle. German, probably around 1700-1705. Baroque pearl, gold, enamel, diamonds, timber. H 3.4 cm, W 3.4 cm, D 2.8 cmGreen Vault, VI 83 h. © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 

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Sea Unicorn, probably Frankfurt am Main, 1st Quarter of the 18th Century. Baroque pearls, gold, enamel, gold-plated silver, diamonds, rubies. H 9.0 cm, width 5.3 cm, depth 3.6 cm. Green Vault, VI 81 f.  © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 

As the entry in the inventory of 1725's gems to be found, was originally located on the back of the sea unicorn "a geflugelt emaillirtes Kindgen whose body of a bead." The elegant sea creatures intricately intertwined with the tail fin is the equivalent of the elephant seal with the wings of Cupid (VI 81 d), there are many references to the. Two mythical animals is associated with an enamel plaque on the base, which shows a mythological love story and at the same time addresses the element of water. In the case of sea-unicorn approaches Perseus on his winged horse Pegsasus to save the Andromeda chained to a rock in front of the approaching sea monster. The composition has striking similarities to a 1624's painting of Adam Willaert on (Lübeck, St. Annen-Museum) in the representation of the three main characters. The action takes place there, but in a sprawling coastal landscape in place while the protagonists are closer together on the small surface of the base plate. For the dissemination of the subject of the grotesque hybrid creatures, which are mounted by small, fortified cupids that appeared in Nuremberg in 1610 was "Neuw grotesques book" of the Nuremberg goldsmith Christoph Jamnitzer crucial. The fantastic sea-monsters can be found at this time about as ornaments on silver-powered vessels or determine the outer shape of animal-faceted drinking vessels, as it has created in greater numbers as the Leipzig Goldsmith Elias Geyer.

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Sea Elephant with Cupid, probably Frankfurt, early 18th Century. Baroque pearls, gold, enamel, silver, gold, diamonds, rubies. H 8.5 cm, W 5.6 cm, D 3.9 cm. Green Vault, VI 81 d.  © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 

Skillfully balancing the small Amorknabe prone on the fish-tailed and equipped with small fins elephant.Naughty stretched armed with a quiver full of arrows and a bow love God the viewer perlenes his rump against while gripping stop looking for the trunk of the sea being. More baroque pearls forming head, chest and back of the mythical creature, significantly referred to as "sea monster" in the inventory. In the front of the covered with finely chiselled ornaments a base enamel plaque with the ride of Neptune and his bride Amphitrite is used across the sea. The design follows a composition by the French court painter Simon Vouet, who found through reproduction engravings, about Michel Dorigny, distribution and was often depicted in enamel painting this time. Outlined in the painting emphasized the work differs significantly from some enamels on similar, acquired by Verbecq bases (cf. VI, 23). This can be understood as a reference for the production of labor organized this expansive bulbous pedestals, the goldsmiths of the relative enamellers the painted plaques. The Perlpretiose, which is the counterpart to the lake Unicorn (VI, 81 f), represents the element of water, which is given expression in various ways: by the sea-elephant, by Neptune, the conqueror of the seas, and not least by the beads as fascinating maritime treasures. At the same time you will have with the sensual and the small wings of Cupid painting executed in fine wedding procession across the sea to understand this imaginative, very intimate treasure chamber piece as a symbol of love.

20

Squatting Harlequin, probably Frankfurt am Main, 1st Quarter of the 18th Century. Baroque pearls, gold, enamel, silver, gold, diamonds. H 5.8 cm, W 5.3 cm, D 5.6 cm. Green Vault, VI 83 a.  © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 

Irregularly grown baroque pearls spurred the human imagination since time immemorial. They provided both inspiration and material basis for the small statuettes of gold, enamel and precious stones "with a body of Pearl." The creativity of the artist who joined the humped shapes of the monstrous beads in associative way with figurative motifs were no limits. The spectrum of Perlfiguren includes animals, mythical creatures, but also harlequins, soldiers, beggars, saints and gods. With a total of 57 pieces of the Green Vault has the world's largest population of this, by 1700 many princely collectors popular gems. Most important supplier for August the Strong, who filled the console of his little corner cabinet with the jeweler sculptures, Guillaume was Verbecq. Although we find the name of the Huguenot jeweler in the accounting records of other princely courts, little is known about his person. Since he acquired works of art have very disparate character, he is primarily - if not exclusively - have served as a dealer. The actual author of the gems purchased by him therefore remain in the dark. For the grotesque dwarfs the <coined the term the 'grotesque figures, the artists were primarily stimulate the graphic work Jacques Callot, which they call the silent tragedy of Callotschen Gobbi mostly the sounds comical. Popular motifs were also the bizarre types of Italian impromptu comedy commedia dell'arte, such as the Harlequin.

21

Blind man led by a boy, Johann Heinrich Köhler(1669-1736) jeweler, Dresden, early 18th century. Baroque pearl, gold, enamel, silver, gilded, diamonds, emeralds, rubies., 10.4 x 12.7 x 8.2 cm. Green Vault, VI 104.  © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden

Johann Heinrich Köhler, who was appointed court jeweler in 1718 by August the Strong, also devoted himself to the fascinating theme of pearl figures. The Green Vault preserves five jewelery sculptures, which are characterized by the high artistic quality and sovereign implementation of various topics.

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Halberdier with dog, probably Frankfurt am Main, 1700-1705. Baroque pearls, gold, enamel, silver, gold, rubies, emeralds, diamonds, steel, blued. H 16.0 cm, W 7.5 cm, D 5.4 cm. VI 111. Green Vault. © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 

In the figure listed as "Swiss" gems already in inventory of 1725 is a Swiss guard. The bearded soldier comes in confident pose, accompanied by his dog. His costume is similar to that of the Swiss Guards at the French court, where it was based in Dresden. After the 1656 by Johann Georg I. Swiss Guard was established in 1680 abolished for reasons of economy again, Augustus the Strong was born in Switzerland in 1701 tried again for an infantry regiment and a Catholic bodyguard of the Polish royal household to recruit. He followed in the model of the Brandenburg-Prussian court, where Frederick III.set new standards. The traditional body-guard, which was first drawn up in 1505 by Pope Julius II in the Vatican, was an important part of court ceremonial. Their job was to protect the members of the royal family and escort when traveling or festive occasions as well as to make their rank according to the official guests waiting. The email painted front of the typical work of commenting on the character of the base Verbecq Hellebardiers. It directs attention to the porch of a stately building, where a voided money bag lying on a table in the foreground. The tape appears on the scene with the saying "Point d'argent, point de Suisse" (translate as with "No money, no goods") alludes to the expensiveness of the prestigious Swiss Guards at. Perhaps, however, it also hides a dig at the embarrassing things of Baron le Jay, who had been sent on behalf of Augustus the Strong of recruiting Swiss, who entrusted to him for that purpose funds but sacrificed his own extremely lavish lifestyle.

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Bacchus on a barrel, maybe Dresden, before 1706. Baroque pearl, gold, silver, partially gilt, enamel, diamonds. H 9.0 cm. Green Vault, VI 99. © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 

On a small keg poised Bacchus, in his left hand a golden cup with red enameled foot reserved. Head, shoulders and hips of the unclothed figure cover vines; loincloth as it is one of two diamond-lined silver wine grape. Another, now lost "red wine grapes" presented the fat god of wine once in his right hand.He sits on a relatively simple, structured only by profiles pedestal, which is different from the richly engraved and decorated with enamel or gemstones bases of many other pieces. Another, also from a baroque cultured pearl Bacchus Herzog Anton Ulrich-Museum, Brunswick, agrees in many details of the Dresdner piece. He was holding a grape originally from ruby and an enameled drinking vessel, but sitting on a barrel designed as a clock. The type of Bacchus as a gnome on a barrel is a confusion with the fat Silenus, the tutor to the wine god, returned. Since the second half of the 16th Century, he served in seasons or monthly cycles are often the personification of autumn or the month of October.Also, the enthroned on a barrel and crowned with vine wine God found in the courtly festival being input as it is occupied for about 1695, held in Dresden gods lift. In the field of figurative drinking vessels and table fountains, it stands for the transformation of the vine fruits in wine, but also, more generally, a symbol of Baroque sensuality. As a prototype, this extremely popular motif is the bronze portrait of Hofzwergs of Cosimo I de Medici, Nano Morgante, the sculptor Giambologna (before 1608).

1

Soldier with spear and sword. Jean Louis Girardet (jeweler), Berlin, probably 1709-1725. Baroque pearls, gold, silver, gold plated, Diamenten, rubies, enamel, ivory. H 9.8 cm, W 7.5 cm, D 6.1 cm; Foot: 6.1 x 6.1 cm. Green Vault, VI 81 b.  © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 

The valuables inventory of 1725 holds valuable information on the origin of Perlfiguren ready. In addition to the Frankfurt dealer Guillaume Verbecq that occurs as a supplier in 16 cases, the name "Gerardet from Berlin" is called. This is by Jean Louis Girardet, one originating from the Burgundy Autun Huguenots. From the beginning of the 18th Century until his death in 1738 he was in Berlin as "orfèvre en or et jouaillier" (goldsmith and jeweler) active. The five detectable in the Green Vault works of the artist Jewel (the fifth Perlfigur is a duck on her nest group) differ significantly from the other Dresden Perlfiguren. Striking is the individual design of the base, for which he also ivory and - using Bernstein - genuinely Prussian. The typical characteristics also include the strapwork ornaments and grotesque masks. Dominant theme of Perlfiguren Girardet is the soldiering. The heroic soldier is just as much attention as the underdogs of society to become beggars and maimed (see Inv No. VI 83 d.) - Motifs that famous series of etchings by Jacques Callot Les Gueux (Beggars) are inspired. Like in the presentation of soldiers storming forward here resonate quite a caricature exaggeration, as Girardet is the desperate state of poverty and infirmity with great empathy again. That this issue was dressed in precious materials, was felt not to be a contradiction. In court masquerades that time they wore costumes beggar luxurious fabric that you tore artfully. 

4

Harlequin with mask and Negro Bobblehead, probably Frankfurt, before 1706. Baroque pearls, gold, enamel, silver, gold, diamond, ruby, rock crystal, Muschelkamee. H 11.0 cm, W 5.3 cm, D 3.7 cm. Green Vault, VI 126.  © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 

Clothing and habit of standing Harlequin correspond to the traditional representation. He wears a tight-fitting costume with the typical diamond pattern in shimmering translucent enamel in blue, dark green, turquoise, yellow to amber and brown. On his left wrist dangles the boards or wooden sword, called the inventory "Prizsche". His face is covered by a black mask as part of his presentation often.The prancing step, the akimbo side arms and the bobble head figure out the stage as though witty, but at the same time also somewhat naive and clumsy jester in mind. Like many other Perlfiguren was acquired by the resident in Frankfurt Huguenot jeweler Guillaume Verbecq also this Harlequin. The base whose shape is typical of the acquired Verbecq works on the obverse is an oval Muschelkamee that is hidden by a rock crystal. The relief made in the finest stone carving work shows simultaneous display of three scenes in a story from Ovid's Metamorphoses after an engraving by Crispijn van de Passe. The sculptor Pygmalion falls in love for the verfertigte of him still a virgin (Galatea), the Venus to his supplication back to life. The Muschelkamee is fitted into an enameled plaque with a flower pattern, which is very similar in form to many Augsburg Email vessels of the early 18th Century met.

10

Sea unicorn with two satyrs on the can lid, probably Frankfurt, before 1725. Baroque pearls, silver, gold plated, gold, enamel, rubies, diamonds, glass. H 9.7 cm, base 10.0 x 7.9 cm. VI 117. Green Vault. © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 

The association irregularly shaped pearls with sea monsters is already found in the jewelry art of the Renaissance, which has spawned a variety of trailers with Tritons, sirens or fish-tailed kite. Also in the graph of the time is a preference for such fantastic hybrid creatures determined. Figures such as the elephant seal or sea-unicorn remember the cute monster in the 1610 published book Neuw grotesques at the Nuremberg goldsmith and engraver Christoph Jamnitzer, exercised its far-reaching influence on the work of art. In this Perlpretiose the sea unicorn, symbol of chastity and purity, two satyrs are compared, which are available for nature and untamed lust. One of bocksbeinigen being tried with the hanging of a (lost) fishing glass grape (now the bridle hanging) the Unicorn take for himself - what he would hardly succeed, for the mythical beast could be tamed only by a virgin, he in whose womb lay his head.

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Ice skating Dutchmanprobably Frankfurt am Main, 1700-1705. Baroque pearls, gold, silver, partially gilt, enamel, rubies, diamonds, glass, partly painted cold mirror glass. H 12.3 cm, pedestal 11.3 x 9.5 cm. Green Vault, VI 96. © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 

Lost in themselves sliding the skaters on the ice, arms to protect against the winter cold folded across his chest. He is wearing a blue, covered with translucent enamel doublet, a short, formed by a monstrous pearl light blue pants and stockings. On his head he wears a hat trimmed with a large ruby and around his neck he has wrapped a scarf. Small diamonds are the Wamsknöpfe and grace Brim, waistbands and buckles of the skates. The box-shaped, solid silver gilt pedestal supported by four slender claw feet. His abgetreppter base and the cover plate are set with rubies, emeralds and diamonds. Smooth pilasters form the architectural framework for the four email painted plaques, which are inserted into the walls. The depicted on the front of Dutch winter landscape with numerous people on an ice surface itself is also tummelnden genre representation and symbol of winter. It is on the other side of the pedestal of Puttenallegorien of Spring (with flower baskets), accompanied the summer (with the grain bundles and fruit basket) and autumn (at the vintage) and expanded to the Four Seasons. In a sophisticated way the imitiation of both specular and matt translucent nature of an ice succeed. The beveled edge of the top glass plate is bordered on the bottom by a matt finish and subsequently painted cold flower ornament which is reflected from a second mirrored glass bottom plate. The ice surface mediated by this artifice the impression of seemingly unfathomable depth. The Perlfigur was acquired by the resident in Frankfurt Huguenot jeweler Guillaume Verbecq.

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Dancer and a violinist and dwarf.  Johann Heinrich Köhler (Goldsmith), Dresden, 1 Quarter of the 18th Century. Baroque pearls, gold, silver, gilt, enamel, emeralds, rubies, diamonds. H 12.6 cm, base: 13.4 x 9.0 cm. VI 102. Green Vault. © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 

 

Johann Heinrich Köhler, who was recorded in 1701 in the Dresden goldsmiths' guild in 1718 and appointed to the court jeweler by August the Strong, also devoted to the fascinating topic of Perlfiguren (also called grotesque figures). The Green Vault secures five jeweler sculptures, which are characterized by the high artistic quality and superior implementation of various topics. The dancer with the fiddling dwarf just seems to spring from the world of courtly festivities, which also Hofzwerge appeared as jester. The motif of graceful Kastagnettenschlägerin is from etching Riciulina - Metzetin inspired (by 1622), in which Jacques Callot processed images of the Commedia dell'Arte. Their short stature and the musicians gave very individual facial features, where nothing is too grotesquely comical own Köhler.

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Seated Beggar. Girardet, Jean Louis (jeweler), Berlin, just before 1725. Baroque pearls, gold, enamel, amber, Perlmutterplättchen, diamonds, rubies. 8.7 cm H, B, 7.0 cm, D 7.0 cm. VI 83 d. Green Vault. © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 

The valuables inventory of 1725 holds valuable information on the origin of Perlfiguren ready. In addition to the Frankfurt dealer Guillaume Verbecq that occurs as a supplier in 16 cases, the name "Gerardet from Berlin" is called. This is by Jean Louis Girardet, one originating from the Burgundy Autun Huguenots. From the beginning of the 18th Century until his death in 1738 he was in Berlin as "orfèvre en or et jouaillier" (goldsmith and jeweler) active. The five detectable in the Green Vault works of the artist Jewel (the fifth Perlfigur is a duck on her nest group) differ significantly from the other Dresden Perlfiguren. Striking is the individual design of the base, for which he also ivory and - using Bernstein - genuinely Prussian. The typical characteristics also include the strapwork ornaments and grotesque masks. Dominant theme of Perlfiguren Girardet is the soldiering. The heroic soldier is just as much attention as the underdogs of society to become beggars and maimed (Figure) - motifs that famous series of etchings by Jacques Callot Les Gueux (Beggars) are inspired.

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Little Lion, probably Dresden, before 1706. Baroque pearl, gold. H 2.5 cm. Green Vault, VI 127 © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 

The lying lion was originally on a black and white bordered wooden post, as can be seen from the inventory entry of 1725. The overgrown pearl, which is characterized by a yellowish-gray shimmer, forms the trunk and head of the animal. His fore and hind legs as well as the abdomen are made of cast gold, which has subsequently received the character of a coat by means of fine incisions. As a separate casting, the mane of the lion, which is like a cap over the pearly head of the animal is slipped. In the hollows of the pearl formerly small diamonds should have been used to designate the eyes. Similarly, the head of a monkey's pear-shaped figurine is designed (Florence, Museo degli Argenti, Inv.No.2551), whose mouth and nostrils are filled with black enamel.

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David with the head of Goliath, probably Dresden, around 1700-1706. Gold, enamel, baroque pearls, diamonds, rubies, quartz varieties in red and white. H 11,7 cm; Base: L 10.7cm, W 8.1cm. Green Vault, VI 105 © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 

In January 1706, boxes with a total of 102 gems and cabinet pieces intended for pledge took their way down the Elbe to Hamburg. Augustus the Strong was at this time in the wake of the Nordic war massively in financial distress and also wanted to protect its treasures from the access of the Swedish occupiers. It was not until eight years later that the convoy returned safely to Dresden. The 34 pearl figures, which August der Starke had largely acquired at the Leipzig trade fair, formed an extensive item. This includes the pearl figure "David with the head of Goliath".

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Mohr with a black puffed face, probably Germany, before 1705. Baroque pearl, mass, colored, silver, enamel, diamonds, wood. H 13.7 cm, W 7.4 cm, D 3.9 cm. Green Vault, VI 171 © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden 

The Mohrenbuste, together with two other pearly figures of the Green Vault ("Meerwunder" Inv. No. VI 169 and Sirene Inv. No. VI 152) form a separate group, which is clearly different from the other pieces in the use of a putty-like mass different. The charm of these idiosyncratic works reminiscent of bozzetti lies in the obvious spontaneity of their creative process. A simple, veneered with ebony pedestal, which is provided in front and behind with an oval insert made of lighter wood, serves the armless bust of the Mohren as a base. His upper body consists of an unusually large, dark Baroque pearl, which is characterized by an amber-colored to red-brown iridescent, shimmering shine. The turquoise-enamelled cape covers the lower part of the bust and should be worn on the back, where he seems to be unmotivated from the shoulder blade, serve to lamination of defects of the pearl. At the same time, the fabric, which is rolled up into a bead, visually compensates for the shoulders, which have different heights due to the irregular curvature of the pearl. On a protruding from the top of the pearl metal pin is made of colored mass mass head. The face and hair are black, the lips are red and the pearl-turbaned headdress is painted red and green. The conclusion of the neck approach is a diamond-studded collar. The dark face of the Mohren, which looks somewhat alienated by a depressed point on the left front side, wins by the sparkling diamond eyes to life. serve for the lamination of defects of the pearl. At the same time, the fabric, which is rolled up into a bead, visually compensates for the shoulders, which have different heights due to the irregular curvature of the bead. On a protruding from the top of the pearl metal pin is made of colored mass mass head. The face and hair are black, the lips are red and the pearl-turbaned headdress is painted red and green. The conclusion of the neck approach is a diamond-studded collar. The dark face of the Mohren, which looks somewhat alienated by a depressed point on the left front side, wins by the sparkling diamond eyes to life. serve for the lamination of defects of the pearl. At the same time, the fabric, which is rolled up into a bead, visually compensates for the shoulders, which have different heights due to the irregular curvature of the bead. On a protruding from the top of the pearl metal pin is made of colored mass mass head. The face and hair are black, the lips are red and the pearl-turbaned headdress is painted red and green. The conclusion of the neck approach is a diamond-studded collar. The dark face of the Mohren, which looks somewhat alienated by a depressed point on the left front side, wins by the sparkling diamond eyes to life. At the same time, the fabric, which is rolled up into a bead, visually compensates for the shoulders, which have different heights due to the irregular curvature of the bead. On a protruding from the top of the pearl metal pin is made of colored mass mass head. The face and hair are black, the lips are red and the pearl-turbaned headdress is painted red and green. The conclusion of the neck approach is a diamond-studded collar. The dark face of the Mohren, which looks somewhat alienated by a depressed point on the left front side, wins by the sparkling diamond eyes to life. At the same time, the fabric, which is rolled up into a bead, visually compensates for the shoulders, which have different heights due to the irregular curvature of the bead. On a protruding from the top of the pearl metal pin is made of colored mass mass head. The face and hair are black, the lips are red and the pearl-turbaned headdress is painted red and green. The conclusion of the neck approach is a diamond-studded collar. The dark face of the Mohren, which looks somewhat alienated by a depressed point on the left front side, gains vitality through the sparkling diamond eyes. The face and hair are black, the lips are red and the pearl-turbaned headdress is painted red and green. The conclusion of the neck approach is a diamond-studded collar. The dark face of the Mohren, which looks somewhat alienated by a depressed point on the left front side, gains vitality through the sparkling diamond eyes. The face and hair are black, the lips are red and the pearl-turbaned headdress is painted red and green. The conclusion of the neck approach is a diamond-studded collar. The dark face of the Mohren, which looks somewhat alienated by a depressed point on the left front side, wins by the sparkling diamond eyes to life.

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Dove with a ring in its beak, probably Germany, before 1706. Baroque pearl, gold, silver, enamel, agate, diamonds. H 10.0 cm. Green Vault, VI 86. © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden

The pearly pigeon, which has spread its wings, each set with 21 diamonds, seems to be flying. The bird is mounted by means of a spring on the massive agate postament so that it starts moving at the slightest touch or vibration of the base. The tail, which is only loosely attached to the rear end of the bead body, and the ring which the pigeon holds in its beak, in this case oscillate back and forth. This special construction, reminiscent of the figures with a wobbly head, invites playful use of the small figure. This is also necessary to know the meaning of the upcoming flight, about which the enameled inscription of the ring gives information: "Je vole, ou L'amour m'apelle" (I fly to where my love calls me). The dove, which was already sacred in the ancient mythology of the goddess Aphrodite, stands in Christian iconography for love, purity, faithfulness and innocence. The peaceful and tender character, which was said to the bird, and its extraordinary local instinct made him, as in this case, appear as a suitable love messenger. It is well conceivable that such an ingenious pretense with the poetically packed message has served a cavalier as a little attention to the lady he admires.

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Resting goat, Frankfurt on the Main, before 1706. Baroque pearl, gold, silver, gilded, enamel, rubies, diamonds. H 6,8 cm. Green Vault, VI 83 f© Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden

There was no limit to the imagination of the goldsmiths, who associated figurative motifs with the irregular forms and structures of the monstrous pearls in an associative way. The story spans from grotesque motifs and genre figures through depictions of ancient mythology and Christian themes to mythical creatures and animals. The latter often has symbolic significance. The goat, which is often found even in the small sculpture of the Renaissance, was then considered the epitome of male potency. He played a major role in the bucolic theme, where he appears in depictions of bacchanalian traits in the wake of satyrs. However, unlike similar works, the enamel plaque of the pedestal misses an immediate reference to this context. It shows a river landscape with two of a she-wolf-infants children: Romulus, the founder of Rome and its namesake, and his brother Remus. Even if the inventories do not contain any information about the origin of the piece, the special shape of the base ("Frankfurter Sockel") suggests that the goat is from the same workshop as the See unicorn purchased by Guillaume Verbecq. The effect of Pretiose is here completely determined by the huge Baroque pearl. It forms the body of the animal to which gold's head, legs and tail are attached. In contrast to most other pearly figures, a colored enamelling was omitted. Even if the inventories do not contain any information about the origin of the piece, the special shape of the base ("Frankfurter Sockel") suggests that the goat is from the same workshop as the See unicorn purchased by Guillaume Verbecq. The effect of Pretiose is here completely determined by the huge Baroque pearl. It forms the body of the animal to which gold's head, legs and tail are attached. In contrast to most other pearly figures, a colored enamelling was omitted. Even if the inventories do not contain any information about the origin of the piece, the special shape of the base ("Frankfurter Sockel") suggests that the goat is from the same workshop as the See unicorn purchased by Guillaume Verbecq. The effect of Pretiose is here completely determined by the huge Baroque pearl. It forms the body of the animal to which gold's head, legs and tail are attached. In contrast to most other pearly figures, a colored enamelling was omitted. Legs and tail are fixed in gold. In contrast to most other pearly figures, a colored enamelling was omitted. Legs and tail are fixed in gold. In contrast to most other pearly figures, a colored enamelling was omitted.

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Nurse with child on a pedestal, Frankfurt on the Main, before 1706. Baroque pearl, gold, silver, gilded, enamel, rubies, diamonds. H 9,3 cm. Green Vault, VI 81 e. © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden

The unfastened dress of the nurse reveals the view of her plump breast, which, like the child's torso, is formed from a bumpy baroque pearl. The white, opaque enamel of the woman's face and arms as well as the little one's body was no longer painted over with a flesh-colored skin tone, so that the incarnate has something doll-like unnatural. Numerous diamonds decorate the hem of her blue-green enameled dress and the chair on which she sits. The curved shape of the pedestal is found in a number of the perlpretioses purchased by the Frankfurt dealer Guillaume Verbecq, but represents an unusual and original variant of this type. It is open on the front and not outside, but painted inside. His interior is transformed into a living room in this way: a tiled floor, tall windows lined with green curtains, tables, chairs, and a columned portico that opens the door to another room define the nurse's habitat. The nostalgia in the tradition of Dutch genre painting as well as the embedding of the figure in an environment connects the nurse with the skater (VI 96), which of course shows a more subtle way of implementation. In the collection of the Green Vault is another nurse with a child, who was bought by Verbecq together with her counterpart, a shoemaker. The two ivory figures, whose gilded silver base opened, were also placed in the corner cabinet. define the habitat of the nurse. The nostalgia in the tradition of Dutch genre painting as well as the embedding of the figure in an environment connects the nurse with the skater (VI 96), which of course shows a more subtle way of implementation. In the collection of the Green Vault is another nurse with a child, who was bought by Verbecq together with her counterpart, a shoemaker. The two ivory figures, whose gilded silver base opened, were also placed in the corner cabinet. define the habitat of the nurse. The nostalgia in the tradition of Dutch genre painting as well as the embedding of the figure in an environment connects the nurse with the skater (VI 96), which of course shows a more subtle way of implementation. In the collection of the Green Vault is another nurse with a child, who was bought by Verbecq together with her counterpart, a shoemaker. The two ivory figures, whose gilded silver base opened, were also placed in the corner cabinet. In the collection of the Green Vault is another nurse with a child, who was bought by Verbecq together with her counterpart, a shoemaker. The two ivory figures, whose gilded silver base opened, were also placed in the corner cabinet. In the collection of the Green Vault is another nurse with a child, who was bought by Verbecq together with her counterpart, a shoemaker. The two ivory figures, whose gilded silver base opened, were also placed in the corner cabinet.

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Allegory of the three cardinal virtues Faith, Love, Hope; probably Frankfurt am Main, 1700-1705. Gold, enamel, diamonds, rubies, silver, gold plated; 15.8 x 7.4 x 5.5 cm. Green Vault, VI 84© Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden

The belly of the gold-enamelled figure, which was acquired by the Frankfurt jeweler Guillaume Verbecq, forms a baroque pearl. The way it is inserted into the opened abdominal wall, evokes associations with anatomical pupae, which provide insights into the interior of the body. The irregular, organic shape of the large pearl, however, convincingly complements the curves of the body and provides the contrapostic stepping position. The three attributes show the crowned, unclothed female figure as an allegory of faith (cup), hope (anchor) and love (ointment). The loosely supported on the anchor or a chalice holding figure corresponds to a common type of representation, but usually represents only one of the Christian virtues. On the enamel plaque of the pedestal appears an idyllic landscape with five cherubs adoring flower wreaths and baskets to a female figure. The inscription "Foy Esperance et Charité" (Faith, Hope and Love), which appears on a stone cube, repeats in words the allegorical meaning of the pear figure. The email miniature reminiscent of emblems of spring is to be interpreted in this context as Caritas, which is thus additionally emphasized as the highest of the three Christian virtues.

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Sea ​​wonder, probably Germany, before 1725. Baroque pearl, diamonds, silver, cold painted, red mass, gilt brass pedestal. H 10.4 cm. Green Vault, VI 169© Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden

According to the inventory, the figure sitting on a "gilded brass gilded post" was "poussed" by a mass, presumably composed of red bolus, wax and natural resins. It was very likely that the still soft material was used to form the body into which the fins made of silver plate were inserted. Subsequently, the white primer and colored version of the mass, as well as the silver fins. On the red back are painted with white lines scales, while the belly and the chest are provided with fine black Strichelungen on whitish-yellow ground. Even the head, which consists of a large pearl and bears small eyes made of silver-clad diamonds, shows traces of red and black cold paint on the mouth and nose. In the shy-looking mythical animal, The inventory referred to as the "miracle of the sea", a marvelous creature of the sea, is a finned fantasy that is reminiscent of a dog, especially in the form of the head and the true-hearted gaze. It forms the counterpart to the similarly manufactured siren (VI 152), which is also mounted on a simple brass parapet. Fantasy creatures of this kind belonged to the figurine arsenal of the popular at that time in Dresden puppet theater, in which "marionettes or large one and a half cubits high figures all kinds of comedy, tragedies, ballets, shepherds, different dances, machines, airframes, all sortszsame sea = miracle = animals and funny harlequinades "were presented. It is a fins-equipped fantasy that is reminiscent of a dog, especially in the form of the head and the true-hearted gaze. It forms the counterpart to the similarly manufactured siren (VI 152), which is also mounted on a simple brass parapet. Fantasy creatures of this kind belonged to the figurine arsenal of the popular at that time in Dresden puppet theater, in which "marionettes or large one and a half cubits high figures all kinds of comedy, tragedies, ballets, shepherds, different dances, machines, airframes, all sortszsame sea = miracle = animals and funny harlequinades "were presented. It is a fins-equipped fantasy that is reminiscent of a dog, especially in the form of the head and the true-hearted gaze. It forms the counterpart to the similarly manufactured siren (VI 152), which is also mounted on a simple brass parapet. Fantasy creatures of this kind belonged to the figurine arsenal of the popular at that time in Dresden puppet theater, in which "marionettes or large one and a half cubits high figures all kinds of comedy, tragedies, ballets, shepherds, different dances, machines, airframes, all sortszsame sea = miracle = animals and funny harlequinades "were presented. It forms the counterpart to the similarly manufactured siren (VI 152), which is also mounted on a simple brass parapet. Fantasy creatures of this kind belonged to the figurine arsenal of the popular at that time in Dresden puppet theater, in which "marionettes or large one and a half cubits high figures all kinds of comedy, tragedies, ballets, shepherds, different dances, machines, airframes, all sortszsame sea = miracle = animals and funny harlequinades "were presented. It forms the counterpart to the similarly manufactured siren (VI 152), which is also mounted on a simple brass parapet. Fantasy creatures of this kind belonged to the figurine arsenal of the popular at that time in Dresden puppet theater, in which "marionettes or large one and a half cubits high figures all kinds of comedy, tragedies, ballets, shepherds, different dances, machines, airframes, all sortszsame sea = miracle = animals and funny harlequinades "were presented.

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Siren with a red fish tail, probably Germany, before 1725. Baroque pearl, small pearl, silver, cold painted, red mass, painted, gilded brass, diamonds. H 8,7 cm. Green Vault, VI 152. © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden

The "Sirenne holds in its hand a red fish tail" is fundamentally different from most of the Dresdner Perlfiguren. The shape of the gilded brass base and the use of a reddish-brown "mass" connect it with the miracle of the sea (Cat.No.45). Both figures are characterized by a comparatively rough processing. In place of the elaborate enamel decoration whose luminosity and color intensity otherwise largely determines the appearance of the perlpretioses, the cold painting occurs in both figures. The inadequate condition of the siren is due to the poorer durability of this color version and also the mass. In the spontaneity of the creative process lies the charm of this work reminiscent of a "bozzetto".

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Marcus Furius Camillus on horseback, 1st quarter of the 18th century. Baroque pearls, gold, diamonds, silver, gold plated, enamel. H 8,6 cm. Green Vault, VI 831. © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden. 

On a trotting horse of brown gold enamel and baroque pearls sits an antikisch dressed soldier. The royal blue helmet with two white feathers, the blue breastplate, the white-green undergarment, but above all the marshal's baton in his right, indicate the high rank of the sitter. The inscription in black lettering on both sides of the unadorned pedestal gives further information about the sitter: "Marcus Furius Camillus Ao Vr: CCCLIX". Accordingly, it is a legendary Roman politician and army commander of the 4th century BC. His real exploits mingled in the representations of later historians of antiquity with those found. Livy was considered Marcus Furius Camillus as the second founder of Rome, who had saved the Republic from the Celts and had triumphed over the Etruscan rival Veij. In addition to some legendary acts attributed to him, there have been demonstrable triumphs that prove his historical significance for the strengthening of the then young Roman Republic and its expansion into the territory of the Etruscans. His rather legendary death during the plague of the year 365 BC It was still widely accepted in the eighteenth century, so that the year 359, inscribed on the inscription of the Perlpretiose, does not coincide with his assumed lifetime and can not refer to any of the victories praised in posterity. The depiction of the Roman hero as a pearl figure has a decidedly timeless and monumental quality.

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Barker or doctor, Germany, around 1700-1733. Baroque pearls, gold, diamonds, enamel, marquise, obsidian, chalcedony, carnelian, nephrite, agate, garnet, plasma, amber, jasper. H 12.2 cm. Green Vault, VI 120. © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden.

The theme of the gemstone figure, which consists of eight different materials, is given in the addendum to the inventory of prequelets, in which the small statuette is listed for the first time: "A small Cabinet piece 5 inches high, introducing a doctor ...". In later inventories, the same statuette appears probably because of their expressive speech as a market crier. The two terms complement each other, and it is clear to what extent immigrant dentists and quack doctors offered their art to the public in markets in the early eighteenth century. The most well-known Heilkünstler of this kind was Johannes Andreas Eisenbarth (1663 - 1727), whose markschreiereaus appearance decisively shaped the popular type of the Quachsalbers. The right hand raised, the left opened, Standing firmly on the ground, his legs slightly apart, the physician meets his audience. The short black coat, the golden bow and the eye-catching hat were among the uniforms of the wandering doctor. Behind the quack was a monkey made of beads on a small table. Later changes in the group of figures make it almost impossible today to put the monkey back in the right place. The presence of a monkey in a wandering physician is explained, on the one hand, by its exoticism, which should arouse interest among the public. On the other hand, monkeys were considered a symbol of vice and vanity and also a symbol of man's imitation of nature. the golden bow and the eye-catching hat belonged to the uniform of the wandering physician. Behind the quack was a monkey made of beads on a small table. Later changes in the group of figures make it almost impossible today to put the monkey back in the right place. The presence of a monkey in a wandering physician is explained, on the one hand, by its exoticism, which should arouse interest among the public. On the other hand, monkeys were considered a symbol of vice and vanity and also a symbol of man's imitation of nature. the golden bow and the eye-catching hat belonged to the uniform of the wandering physician. Behind the quack was a monkey made of beads on a small table. Later changes in the group of figures make it almost impossible today to put the monkey back in the right place. The presence of a monkey in a wandering physician is explained, on the one hand, by its exoticism, which should arouse interest among the public. On the other hand, monkeys were considered a symbol of vice and vanity and also a symbol of man's imitation of nature. The presence of a monkey in a wandering physician is explained, on the one hand, by its exoticism, which should arouse interest among the public. On the other hand, monkeys were considered a symbol of vice and vanity and also a symbol of man's imitation of nature. The presence of a monkey in a wandering physician is explained, on the one hand, by its exoticism, which should arouse interest among the public. On the other hand, monkeys were considered a symbol of vice and vanity and also a symbol of man's imitation of nature.

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Saint Lucretia, probably Germany, before 1706. Baroque pearl, gold, enamel, ivory (base). H 4.8 cm. Green Vault, VI 83 o. © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden. 

The three-quarter figure of the Lukretia, sitting in the manner of a play figure on the ivory pedestal, is characterized by its subtle workmanship. Her golden robe, covered with opaque turquoise enamel, reveals her beady body into which the tragic figure drills the dagger. On the back unfolds a wealth at this point unexpected miniature enamel work. In front of the white cloak with its colorful flower and stripe pattern, a large flower with translucent, melted leaves spreads out, which seems to sprout directly out of the tiny ivory pedestal.

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Saint Sebastian, Frankfurt a. M., before 1706. Baroque pearl, gold, enamel, silver, gilded, emeralds, diamonds. H 12.5 cm. Green Vault, VI 106. © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden.

A large, elongated pearl forms the body of the martyr Sebastian, who is struck by arrows. The Roman officer, martyred for his steadfast confessions to Christ, has his eyes fixed on the sky. He was handcuffed to a tree stump surrounded by vines. In a haunting way, the suffering of the saint is translated into the formal language of the perlpretioses. The event takes place on a splendid pedestal, the front of which is adorned by an enamel portrait that interprets the Christian love of Sebastian in the symbolic language of the baroque. The pearl figure was already in the first Pretiosensammlung August the Strong, which was pledged by this.

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Lying camel, probably Germany, before 1706. Silver, gold plated, baroque pearl, gold, enamel; 3.5 x 3.5 x 3.0 cm. Green Vault, VI 106. © Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden. 

The base plate of the miniature plastic is covered with a uniform layer of translucent green enamel. A purple-shimmering Baroque pearl on one side forms the hull of the camel. On his back a Turkish rider has taken his place, holding in his hands the golden reins and a golden staff. The clothing of this "Bleumerant enameled Türcke (s)" is described in great detail: he wears a turban, which was probably originally set with a small pearl, and a light blue robe with tiny, white enameled buttons, the collar and Braids are deposited in gold. The figure is reminiscent of the small elephant from the collection of Anna Luisa de 'Medici (Florence, Museo degli Argenti, Inv. No. 2539), which is also engraved on a green oval plate.