5

An exquisite Art Nouveau glass, enamel and baroque pearl "Salomé" brooch, by René Lalique. Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2012

The shield-shaped plaque centering upon a sculpted and carved iridescent greenish-blue glass maiden with flowing draped fabric, backed by a gold panel, within a graduated blue cloisonné and iridescent plique-à-jour enameled twin serpent frame, suspending a baroque pearl, mounted in gold, circa 1904-1905. Signed Lalique for René Lalique. The pearl has not been tested for natural origin. Estimate $80,000 - $120,000. Price Realized $471,500

Literature: Yvonne Brunhammer, "The Jewels of Lalique", Flammarion, Paris, 1998, page 64-65
Penny Proddow and Marion Fasel, "Bejeweled: Great Designers, Celebrity Style", Harry N. Abrams, Inc., New York, 2001, contents page
"René Lalique: 1860-1945", APT International Inc., Tokyo, 2000-2001, page 123
Exhibited
"René Lalique, Jewelry Glass", Paris, Musée des Arts Décoratifs, 22 October 1991-March 1992, no. 214
"René Lalique", Tokyo, The National Museum of Modern Art, 23 May-12 July 1992, no. 116
"The Jewels of Lalique", New York, National Design Museum, Smithsonian Institution, 3 February-12 April 1998; Washington D.C., International Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, 15 May-16 August 1998; Dallas, Dallas Museum of Art, 13 September 1998-10 January 1999, no. 140

Notes: cf. Sigrid Barten, "René Lalique, Schmuck und Objets d'art 1890-1910: Monographie und Werkkatalog", Prestel-Verlag, München, 1977, page 108 (appears to be working sketch)

6

A magnificent Art Nouveau enamel, glass and ivory chalice, by René Lalique. Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2012

The green plique-à-jour enamel ivy leaf base, intersected by undulating forest green enamel grape vines, extending an openwork green enamel and cabochon green glass stem, centering upon a carved and pierced central cylindrical ivory plaque, depicting male and female figures frolicking in a Bacchic scene, to the sculpted transparent glass and green plique-à-jour enamel cup, set with six carved ivory plaques, each depicting three Bacchantes in relief, accented by forest green enameled trim, mounted in gold, circa 1899-1901, 4½ x 4½ x 6 ins., in a red leather fitted case. Signed R. Lalique for René Lalique. Estimate $200,000 - $250,000. Price Realized $251,500

Literature: Sigrid Barten, "René Lalique, Schmuck und Objets d'art 1890-1910: Monographie und Werkkatalog", Prestel-Verlag, München, 1977, page 546
Yvonne Brunhammer, "The Jewels of Lalique", Flammarion, Paris, 1998, page 163

8

A rare Art Nouveau "Butterflies and Bats" pocketwatch, by René Lalique. Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2012

Of gilt-finished jeweled lever movement, the openface pocketwatch of circular outline with blued-steel moon-style hands and applied black enameled Arabic numerals, against the gold ground accented by blue and white enameled fluttering butterflies, within a polished gold case, the reverse depicting numerous flying purplish blue enameled bats, with scattered moonstone accents, further embellished by a sculpted gold serpent bow, circa 1899-1900, with French export marks.Signed Lalique for René Lalique; case, cuvette and movement no. 16423. Estimate $60,000 - $80,000. Price Realized $207,500

Literature: Sigrid Barten, "René Lalique, Schmuck und Objets d'art 1890-1910: Monographie und Werkkatalog", Prestel-Verlag, München, 1977, page 501
Vivienne Becker, "The Jewellery of René Lalique", The Goldsmith's Company, 1987, pages 134-135
Yvonne Brunhammer, "The Jewels of Lalique", Flammarion, Paris, 1998, page 70-71
Michael Koch, "The Belle Epoque of French Jewellery: 1850-1910", Thomas Henage & Co. Limited, London, 1991, page 221
Penny Proddow and Marion Fasel, "Bejeweled: Great Designers, Celebrity Style", Harry N. Abrams, Inc., New York, 2001, page 43
Alastair Duncan, "The Paris Salons, 1895-1914: Volume II", Antique Collectors' Club, Woodbridge, Suffolk, 1994, page 37
"René Lalique: 1860-1945", APT International Inc., Tokyo, 2000-2001, page 102-103

Exhibited: "Art Nouveau: Belgium, France", Rice Museum, 26 March-27 June 1976; Chicago, The Art Institute, 28 August-31 October 1976, no. 252
"Art Nouveau Jewelry by René Lalique", Baltimore, The Walters Art Gallery; Richmond, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Fort Worth, Kimbell
Art Museum, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 1985, no. 56
"The Jewellery of René Lalique", London, The Goldsmiths' Hall, 28 May-22 November 1987, no. 126
"Pariser Schmuck: vom 2. Kaiserreich zur Belle Epoque", Munich, Bayerisches Nationalmuseum, 1 December 1989-4 March 1990, no. 142
"René Lalique, Jewelry Glass", Paris, Musée des Arts Décoratifs, 22 October 1991-March 1992, no. 224
"René Lalique", Tokyo, The National Museum of Modern Art, 23 May-12 July 1992, no. 137
"The Jewels of Lalique", New York, National Design Museum, Smithsonian Institution, 3 February-12 April 1998; Washington D.C., International Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, 15 May-16 August 1998; Dallas, Dallas Museum of Art, 13 September 1998-10 January 1999, no. 46

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A spectacular  Art Nouveau horn page turner, by René Lalique. Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2012

Depicting a realistically carved and stained fish, swimming within the tapered textured horn panel, circa 1906-1908, 2¼ x 20 ins., in an R. Lalique white satin case. Signed Lalique for René Lalique. Estimate $40,000 - $60,000. Price Realized $130,500

Literature: Sigrid Barten, "René Lalique, Schmuck und Objets d'art 1890-1910: Monographie und Werkkatalog", Prestel-Verlag, München, 1977, page 520
Yvonne Brunhammer, "The Jewels of Lalique", Flammarion, Paris, 1998, page 203
Alastair Duncan, "The Paris Salons, 1895-1914: Volume II", Antique Collectors' Club, Woodbridge, Suffolk, 1994, page 15
"René Lalique: 1860-1945", APT International Inc., Tokyo, 2000-2001, page 139

Exhibited: "The Jewels of Lalique", New York, National Design Museum, Smithsonian Institution, 3 February-12 April 1998; Washington D.C., International Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, 15 May-16 August 1998; Dallas, Dallas Museum of Art, 13 September 1998-10 January 1999, no. 230

9

An Art Nouveau horn and peridot hair comb, by René Lalique. Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2012

The shield-shaped carved horn panel depicting two gold stained snakes poised to strike, enhanced by scattered vari-shape cabochon peridots, extending three additional gold stained carved snakes, the tails forming the comb, circa 1898, in a René Lalique sea green fitted case. Signed R. Lalique for René Lalique, 1898. Estimate $25,000 - $30,000. Price Realized $107,550

Literature: Vivienne Becker, "The Jewellery of René Lalique", The Goldsmith's Company, 1987, pages 160
"René Lalique: 1860-1945", APT International Inc., Tokyo, 2000-2001, page 61

Exhibited: Exposition Universelle, Paris, July 1900
"The Jewellery of René Lalique", London, Goldsmiths' Hall, 28 May-22 November 1987, no. 165
"René Lalique", Tokyo, The Museum of Modern Art, 23 May-12 July 1992, no. 9

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An exquisite Art Nouveau opal, glass, diamond and enamel "Rose" plaque, by René Lalique. Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2012

The oval-cut white opal, within a rose-cut diamond openwork surround, extending undulating polished gold stems with green plique-à-jour enameled leaves, each terminating in a sculpted pink glass rose blossom, with rose-cut diamond trim, the reverse similarly decorated, mounted in gold, (with hoop for suspension), circa 1901. Signed Lalique for René Lalique. Estimate $60,000 - $80,000. Price Realized $107,550

Literature: Sigrid Barten, "René Lalique, Schmuck und Objets d'art 1890-1910: Monographie und Werkkatalog", Prestel-Verlag, München, 1977, page 335
Michael Koch, "The Belle Epoque of French Jewellery: 1850-1910", Thomas Henage & Co. Limited, London, 1991, page 227

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An Art Nouveau enamel, opal and gold corsage pin finial,, by René Lalique. Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2012

Centering an oval-shaped openwork scene, depicting three gray enameled satyrs confronting a gray enameled maenad, with a calibré-cut black opal, to the polished gold borders, extending a series of textured gold terminals, each enhanced by blue and translucent purple enamel, the base further decorated by a blue enamel organic motif, the reverse in chased gold relief, mounted in gold, (pin stem deficient), circa 1899-1900. Signed Lalique for René Lalique. Estimate $30,000 - $40,000. Price Realized $101,575

Literature: Sigrid Barten, "René Lalique, Schmuck und Objets d'art 1890-1910: Monographie und Werkkatalog", Prestel-Verlag, München, 1977, page 478
Yvonne Brunhammer, "The Jewels of Lalique", Flammarion, Paris, 1998, page 94-95
Michael Koch, "The Belle Epoque of French Jewellery: 1850-1910", Thomas Henage & Co. Limited, London, 1991, page 221
Alastair Duncan, "The Paris Salons, 1895-1914: Volume II", Antique Collectors' Club, Woodbridge, Suffolk, 1994, page 34
"René Lalique: 1860-1945", APT International Inc., Tokyo, 2000-2001, page 82

Exhibited: "Art Nouveau: Belgium, France", Rice Museum, 26 March-27 June 1976; Chicago, The Art Institute, 28 August-31 October 1976, no. 410
"Art Nouveau Jewelry by René Lalique", Baltimore, The Walters Art Gallery; Richmond, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Fort Worth, Kimbell Art Museum, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 1985, no. 55
"Pariser Schmuck: vom 2. Kaiserreich zur Belle Epoque", Munich, Bayerisches Nationalmuseum, 1 December 1989-4 March 1990, no. 141
"René Lalique, Jewelry Glass", Paris, Musée des Arts Décoratifs, 22 October 1991-March 1992, no. 207
"René Lalique", Tokyo, The National Museum of Modern Art, 23 May-12 July 1992, no. 25
"The Jewels of Lalique", New York, National Design Museum, Smithsonian Institution, 3 February-12 April 1998; Washington D.C., International Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, 15 May-16 August 1998; Dallas, Dallas Museum of Art, 13 September 1998-10 January 1999, no. 106

Note: This piece was based on a fifth century B.C.E. red-figure bowl Lalique may have encountered at the British Museum while studying in London. The ancient bowl or drinking cup, by the Attic vase Brygos Painter, depicts the legend 'Hera and Iris pursued by the Silenes' with satyrs in these exact poses, but reverse order. The nude female figure was an addition by Lalique.

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An Art Nouveau glass, enamel and aquamarine brooch , by René Lalique. Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2012

The openwork plaque, suspending a central kite-shaped aquamarine, encased within a frame of entwined translucent green glass stylized fish, extending blue and green enameled fins, enhanced at the cardinal points by a half-moon, triangular or navette-shaped aquamarine, mounted in gold, circa 1904-1905. Signed Lalique for René Lalique Estimate $50,000 - $60,000. Price Realized $77,675

Literature: Yvonne Brunhammer, "The Jewels of Lalique", Flammarion, Paris, 1998, page 192
"René Lalique: 1860-1945", APT International Inc., Tokyo, 2000-2001, page 128

Exhibited: "The Jewels of Lalique", New York, National Design Museum, Smithsonian Institution, 3 February-12 April 1998; Washington D.C., International Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, 15 May-16 August 1998; Dallas, Dallas Museum of Art, 13 September 1998-10 January 1999, no. 132

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A delicate  Art Nouveau enamel and pearl pendant,, by René Lalique. Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2012

Centering upon a carved and stained blue simulated ivory plaque depicting five dancing nymphs, within a scrolling blue guilloche enamel frame, enhanced by two textured gold and blue enameled flowers extending curving tendrils, suspending a drop-shaped pearl, measuring approximately 10.90 x 7.00 mm, mounted in 18k gold, circa 1902-1903, with French assay marks and maker's mark. Signed Lalique for René Lalique, with maker's mark for René Lalique. Estimate $25,000 - $30,000. Price Realized $71,700

Literature: Yvonne Brunhammer, "The Jewels of Lalique", Flammarion, Paris, 1998, page 143
"René Lalique: 1860-1945", APT International Inc., Tokyo, 2000-2001, page 121

Exhibited: "The Jewels of Lalique", New York, National Design Museum, Smithsonian Institution, 3 February-12 April 1998; Washington D.C., International Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, 15 May-16 August 1998; Dallas, Dallas Museum of Art, 13 September 1998-10 January 1999, no. 113

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An exquisite Art Nouveau rock crystal and glass brooch,, by René Lalique. Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2012

Of square outline, composed of four etched glass panels depicting maidens scattering flower petals, enhanced at the corners by cushion-cut simulated diamond accents, mounted in platinum and gold, circa 1904-1905. Signed Lalique for René Lalique. Estimate $20,000 - $25,000. Price Realized $62,140

Literature: Sigrid Barten, "René Lalique, Schmuck und Objets d'art 1890-1910: Monographie und Werkkatalog", Prestel-Verlag, München, 1977, page 427
Yvonne Brunhammer, "The Jewels of Lalique", Flammarion, Paris, 1998, page 138
"René Lalique: 1860-1945", APT International Inc., Tokyo, 2000-2001, page 123
Exhibited
"René Lalique, Jewelry Glass", Paris, Musée des Arts Décoratifs, 22 October 1991-March 1992, no. 223
"René Lalique", Tokyo, The National Museum of Modern Art, 23 May-12 July 1992, no. 117
"The Jewels of Lalique", New York, National Design Museum, Smithsonian Institution, 3 February-12 April 1998; Washington D.C., International Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, 15 May-16 August 1998; Dallas, Dallas Museum of Art, 13 September 1998-10 January 1999, no. 141

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An Art Nouveau enamel pendant necklace, by René Lalique. Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2012

The pendant centering upon a textured gold and enameled plaque depicting four veiled women in procession, within a frame of purple enameled tree branches, enhanced by textured green enameled leaves, suspended from a purple enameled bar-link neckchain, mounted in 18k gold, circa 1900-1902, 22¼ ins., with French assay mark, in a Lalique navy leather fitted case. Signed Lalique for René Lalique. Estimate $30,000 - $40,000. Price Realized $53,775

Literature: Sigrid Barten, "René Lalique, Schmuck und Objets d'art 1890-1910: Monographie und Werkkatalog", Prestel-Verlag, München, 1977, page 323
Penny Proddow and Marion Fasel, "Bejeweled: Great Designers, Celebrity Style", Harry N. Abrams, Inc., New York, 2001, page 40
"René Lalique: 1860-1945", APT International Inc., Tokyo, 2000-2001, page 108

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An exquisite  Art Nouveau enamel and diamond brooch, by René Lalique. Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2012

The iridescent blue enameled chased gold plaque, of lozenge-shaped outline, depicting a female face in thought, adorned by opalescent enameled pansies, to the rose-cut diamond frame, mounted in gold, circa 1899-1901, with French importation marks. Signed Lalique for René Lalique. Estimate $25,000 - $30,000. Price Realized $45,410

Literature: Sigrid Barten, "René Lalique, Schmuck und Objets d'art 1890-1910: Monographie und Werkkatalog", Prestel-Verlag, München, 1977, page 403
Yvonne Brunhammer, "The Jewels of Lalique", Flammarion, Paris, 1998, page 69
"René Lalique: 1860-1945", APT International Inc., Tokyo, 2000-2001, page 73

Exhibited"Art Nouveau: Belgium, France", Rice Museum, 26 March-27 June 1976, Chicago, The Art Institute, 28 August-31 October 1976, no. 405
"The Jewels of Lalique", New York, National Design Museum, Smithsonian Institution, 3 February-12 April 1998; Washington D.C., International Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, 15 May-16 August 1998; Dallas, Dallas Museum of Art, 13 September 1998-10 January 1999, no. 40

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An Art Nouveau ivory and gem-set brooch, by René Lalique. Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2012

The sculpted ivory women, adorned by Phygian bonnets, emerging from a pool of ivory, trimmed with rose-cut diamonds and pale yellow glass accents, mounted in gold, circa 1901-1902. Signed Lalique for René Lalique. Estimate $20,000 - $25,000. Price Realized $45,410

Literature: Yvonne Brunhammer, "The Jewels of Lalique", Flammarion, Paris, 1998, page 190

Note: Lalique's fascination with Eastern culture and motifs is evident in his use of the Phygian bonnet, a short and pointed cap worn by Persian soldiers. Often depicted in early images of the Persian god Mithras, this bonnet later became fashionable in Italy and France during the late 14th and 15th centuries.

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An Art Nouveau hardstone and enamel brooch, by René Lalique. Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2012

Designed as a carved white hardstone Mercury, wearing a sculpted silver helmet, extending openwork green and blue enamel wings in a butterfly motif, enhanced by sculpted gold swags, mounted in silver and gold, circa 1897-1899. Signed Lalique for René Lalique. Mercury, personification of eloquence and reason, often appears in mythology as the messenger to the Greek gods. He is usually depicted wearing winged shoes and a winged hat, called a petasus, for swift travel. Estimate $12,000 - $15,000. Price Realized $38,240

Provenance: Sold Sotheby's Geneva, "Masterpieces of Art Nouveau Jewellery", 19 November 1997, lot 21

Literature: Yvonne Brunhammer, "The Jewels of Lalique", Flammarion, Paris, 1998, page 181
"René Lalique: 1860-1945", APT International Inc., Tokyo, 2000-2001, page 67

Exhibited: "The Jewels of Lalique", New York, National Design Museum, Smithsonian Institution, 3 February-12 April 1998; Washington D.C., International Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, 15 May-16 August 1998; Dallas, Dallas Museum of Art, 13 September 1998-10 January 1999, no. 11

Note: Mercury, personification of eloquence and reason, often appears in mythology as the messenger to the Greek gods. He is usually depicted wearing winged shoes and a winged hat, called a petasus, for swift travel.

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An Art Nouveau enamel ring, by René Lalique. Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2012

Of oblong outline, designed as four blue plique-à-jour enamel lotus blossoms, enhanced by green cloisonné enamel stems, intersected by a opalescent plique-à-jour enamel cross motif, mounted in gold, circa 1900-1902, in a René Lalique brown leather fitted case. Signed Lalique. Estimate $8,000 - $10,000. Price Realized $35,850

Literature: Yvonne Brunhammer, "The Jewels of Lalique", Flammarion, Paris, 1998, page 187
"René Lalique: 1860-1945", APT International Inc., Tokyo, 2000-2001, page 86

Exhibited: "The Jewels of Lalique", New York, National Design Museum, Smithsonian Institution, 3 February-12 April 1998; Washington D.C., International Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, 15 May-16 August 1998; Dallas, Dallas Museum of Art, 13 September 1998-10 January 1999, no. 82

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An Art Nouveau ivory and enamel pendant, by René Lalique. Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2012

The carved ivory plaque, depicting a maiden in profile, her tresses adorned by flowers, encased by brown and blue enameled branches, with sculpted iridescent yellow enameled flowers, and pale green leaves, mounted in gold, circa 1904-1905. Signed Lalique for René Lalique. Estimate $25,000 - $30,000. Price Realized  $25,095

Literature: Sigrid Barten, "René Lalique, Schmuck und Objets d'art 1890-1910: Monographie und Werkkatalog", Prestel-Verlag, München, 1977, page 324

DT222401

An Art Nouveau enamel and diamond brooch, by René Lalique. Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2012

Designed as a textured gold woman in profile, with black enameled hair, wearing a sea green enameled headdress, enhanced by two sculpted orange enameled chrysanthemums, each centering upon an old European-cut diamond pistil and flecked with black enamel, extending a textured gold stem to a third orange enamel blossom, mounted in 18k gold, (inscribed "1908"), circa 1908, with French assay mark. Signed Lalique for René Lalique. Estimate $12,000 - $15,000. Price Realized $11,353

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An Art Nouveau enamel hat pin, by René Lalique. Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2012

Designed as a cluster of yellow enameled berries, extending openwork textured green enameled leaves, mounted in gold, circa 1902-1903, with French assay mark and import mark. Signed Lalique for René Lalique. Estimate $8,000 - $10,000. Price Realized $8,963

Literature: Yvonne Brunhammer, "The Jewels of Lalique", Flammarion, Paris, 1998, page 188
"René Lalique: 1860-1945", APT International Inc., Tokyo, 2000-2001, page 91

Exhibited: "The Jewels of Lalique", New York, National Design Museum, Smithsonian Institution, 3 February-12 April 1998; Washington D.C., International Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, 15 May-16 August 1998; Dallas, Dallas Museum of Art, 13 September 1998-10 January 1999, no. 84

DT546

An unusual Art Nouveau gilt invitation, by René Lalique. Photo Christie's Image Ltd 2012

Of circular outline, the hammered gilt plaque decorated with a sculpted woman wearing a crown of leaves and berries, inscribed, " Invitation à l' Exposition de R. Lalique 24 Place Vendôme", circa 1905-1906. Signed RL for René Lalique. Estimate $20,000 - $25,000. Price Realized  $15,535

Literature: Sigrid Barten, "René Lalique, Schmuck und Objets d'art 1890-1910: Monographie und Werkkatalog", Prestel-Verlag, München, 1977, page 567
"René Lalique: 1860-1945", APT International Inc., Tokyo, 2000-2001, page 38

Exhibited: "The Jewels of Lalique", New York, National Design Museum, Smithsonian Institution, 3 February-12 April 1998; Washington D.C., International Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, 15 May-16 August 1998; Dallas, Dallas Museum of Art, 13 September 1998-10 January 1999, no. 231

Note: The image of the female on the invitation could be that of Sarah Bernhardt

René Lalique.

René Lalique, the creative father of the Art Nouveau movement, was born in 1860 in Ay, France. His childhood was spent surrounded by the lush beauty of the woods of Champagne and he painted and drew wildlife from an early age. At age 16, his father died, and Lalique was forced to earn a living. He apprenticed to the jeweler Louis Aucoc because his mother had heard that the life of a jeweler was not too straining. After two years, his studies led him to London, where he attended Sydenham College, a progressive arts institute associated with the Arts & Crafts movement. It was at Sydenham that Lalique studied English literature and poetry. Themes from romantic and tragic literature inspired many of his most celebrated works.

After his schooling in England, Lalique returned to Paris and continued his studies in sculpture and drawing while working for various jewelers. It was at this time that he began working for famous and established firms such as Cartier, Boucheron and Vever (lot 397). The majority of the pieces that he created during this period, detailed in Henrí Vever's "French Jewelry of the Nineteenth Century", were in the same vein as other jewelry of the time. The popular court style often depicted simple, diamond-set jewels in stylistic blooming flowers. It was common practice to set diamonds upon a tiny spring, causing the gems to sparkle and reflect light as they bounced. These early diamond and gem-set pendants, brooches and devant-de-corsages were works that furthered his experience with precious stones and metal and set the stage for his later, more sculptural pieces.

In 1885, Lalique took over the Place Gaillon Workshops and began early experiments with glass and later, horn (lots 144, 399, 404, 405). He steered away from the use of diamonds and other traditional gems and chose instead to utilize semi-precious stones such as opal, citrine and ivory. He perfected his masterful use of enamel, especially plique-à-jour, the most difficult and dramatic medium (lots 388, 391, 395, 402).

In realizing the greatest flights of his imagination, Lalique broke with the traditional jewelry establishment. Early critics were shocked at his use of serpents poised to strike, maenads in Bacchic frenzy, nude maidens, somber nuns and darting fish (lots 390, 392, 396, 401). At first, retailers and critics called his work "a commercial risk". However, by the Exposition Universalle in 1900, Lalique had become the most sought after jeweler in Paris. Sarah Bernhardt, Madame Meurlot-Chollet and Alice Roosevelt, President Roosevelt's fashionable daughter, purchased and commissioned pieces from him. Lalique was called a "Master of French Jewelry" and won the rosette of the Légion d'Honneur. Lalique's fabulous presentation, shown adjacent to his former employer, Henrí Vever, was a success. Interestingly, both Lalique and Vever were awarded with Grand Prix for the Exposition Universelle of 1900.

Lalique often borrowed from the Japanese style in his works. His tender, often asymmetrical, rendering of nature evoked the simplicity of Japanese design. Other notable influences were the sculptor Auguste Rodin (lot 386) and the Gustav Klimt (lot 387). Lalique was able to blend these influences into intense and moody jewels, illustrating a fall sunset (lot 404), a pensive Mercury (lot 400), or women emerging from a pool of ivory water (lot 393).

In 1905, Lalique opened a retail shop next to Coty on 24 Place Vendome and began designing perfume bottles for many Parisian perfumeries. His workshop shifted to the commercial production of vases, clocks and light fixtures. Around 1910, a flood of bad Art Nouveau imitations disillusioned Lalique about jewelry. The mass-produced pieces lost the detailed and sensuous quality that Lalique had perfected. He stopped creating jewels and turned to glass manufacturing as a second career.

René Lalique was an exceptional artisan, craftsman and innovator. Although he became widely known for his glass pieces, critics often note that his jewels displayed his greatest mastery. The course of jewelry design shifted drastically because of this innovator: jewelers were introduced to organic materials such as horn and ivory; glass was freely mixed with precious and semi-precious gemstones. Most importantly, Lalique restored creative freedom in jewelry design. His influence extended upon other French jewelers at the turn of the century, the American, Louis Comfort Tiffany and even the jewelry of the Art Deco movement. His legacy survives to this day, not just with inspiration of design, but with the philosophy that it is exciting not to conform.

Christie's. MAGNIFICENT JEWELS, 15 October 2002, New York, Rockefeller Plaza