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 Lot 598. A 9.98 Carat ‘No Oil’ Colombian Emerald and Diamond Ring. Estimate: HK$4,800,000-6,000,000 (€ 540,000 - 680,000). Sold for HK$ 4,975,625 (€ 566,661). © Bonhams 2001-2019..

Hong Kong – The international auction house Bonhams will present its Hong Kong Jewels and Jadeite sale on Sunday 26 May 2019, offering a collection of jewellery which is perfect for every occasion, be it daytime, cocktails or dinner. Led by a mesmerising and near-flawless 9.98 carat Colombian 'no oil' emerald ring, this collection features important coloured gemstones, white and coloured diamonds, jadeite, signed jewellery sets and vintage jewellery, and is a curated response to the changing tastes of contemporary jewellery collectors.

Paul Redmayne-Mourad, Head of Sale, Jewellery, Bonhams Hong Kong, commented: "There is a marked trend that our clients are increasingly collecting for style rather than buying merely for safekeeping. We are seeing that these collectors enjoy wearing their pieces about town in a more relaxed setting, whilst also mixing and matching for different – perhaps more formal – occasions. These collectors are also very well-informed and proactively seek information about what they collect,"

"Our forthcoming sale is a response to these trending tastes, as we offer a diverse range of jewellery that will allow contemporary collectors to buy what defines their style for any occasion," Redmayne-Mourad continued.

Among the highlights is an exceptional collection of fine emeralds, rare and historic sapphires, rubies, spinels and white and coloured diamonds. This includes two unheated Kashmir sapphire rings weighing 5.01 carats and 4.22 carats respectively, as well as a 3.04 carat Burma no heat pigeon's blood ruby ring.

The auction will also offer an array of striking signed jewellery from such prestigious houses as Boucheron, Bulgari, Cartier, Tiffany & Co and Van Cleef & Arpels, as well as a number of vintage items including a diamond tiara from the late 19th century, a carved emerald brooch by Cartier from the 1930s, a selection of Art Deco rings, and a highly desirable Van Cleef & Arpels ruby and diamond bracelet from the 1960s.

HIGHLIGHTS FOR CONTEMPORARY COLLECTORS FOR ALL OCCASIONS

FOR DAYTIME WEAR

515

 Lot 515. A Malachite and Diamond Pendant Necklace, by Cartier. Estimate: HK$40,000 – 60,000 (€ 4,500 - 6,800)Sold for HK$ 75,625 (€ 8,612). © Bonhams 2001-2019

The domed malachite pendant, accented by brilliant-cut diamonds, completed by an adjustable trace-link chain, highlighted with a similarly set malachite detail towards the back, signed Cartier, numbered, maker's mark, pendant detachable, pendant length 2.5cm, full chain length 65.0cm, original pouch and paperwork

Accompanied by a Cartier authenticity certificate. Report number 2243315, serial number BQY930, dated 20 July 2015.

 

 

516

Lot 516. A Pair of Diamond 'LOVE' Bangles, by Cartier. Estimate: HK$118,000 - 200,000 (€ 13,000 - 23,000)Sold for HK$ 388,125 (€ 44,202). © Bonhams 2001-2019

Each hinged bangle pavé-set throughout with brilliant-cut diamonds, one inset with black ceramic, the other of similar screw-head motifs, diamonds approximately, 4.15 carats total, signed Cartier, numbered, inner circumference 15.0cm, original pouches and paperwork (2)

Accompanied by two Cartier authenticity certificates. Reference numbers N6036916 and N6032416, serial numbers XZ0070 and BEP274, dated 22 September 2014 and 14 June 2015 respectively.

528

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Lot 528. Two 'B.Zero1' Rings, by Bulgari. One ring set as a single band; the other designed by Zaha Hadid as a triple band. Estimate: HK$15,000 - 25,000 (€ 1,700 - 2,800). Amended© Bonhams 2001-2019

 both signed Bulgari, Italy, ring sizes 7½ and 8 (2).

FOR COCKTAILS

597

 

Lot 597. A Fancy Yellow Diamond and Diamond Bracelet-Choker. Estimate: HK$450,000-650,000 (€ 51,000 - 74,000)Sold for HK$ 563,125 (€ 64,132). © Bonhams 2001-2019

Of stylised openwork design, the articulated bracelet set with eleven radiant-cut fancy yellow diamonds, within 'four-leaf clover' surrounds pavé-set with brilliant-cut diamonds, to similar and baguette-cut diamond frames, completed by a leather bracelet, fancy yellow diamonds 12.89 carats total, remaining diamonds approximately 14.45 carats total, leather segment detachable, individual bracelet lengths 16.5 and 17.7cm, choker length 34.2cm

Accompanied by eleven GIA reports stating that the 1.86-1.00 carat diamonds are natural Fancy Yellow colour, VS2-SI2 clarity

4

 

551

 

Lot 551. A Ruby and Diamond Bangle, by Van Cleef and Arpels. Estimate: HK$280,000-360,000 (€ 32,000 - 41,000)Sold for HK$ 425,625 (€ 48,473). © Bonhams 2001-2019

The hinged bangle centring upon a cabochon ruby, within a brilliant-cut diamond surround, completed by a row of calibré-cut rubies, between brilliant-cut diamond borders, diamonds approximately 11.20 carats total, signed Van Cleef and Arpels, numbered, maker's mark, French assay marks, inner circumference 16.2cm.

570

570

Lot 570. An Art Deco Carved Emerald, Gem-set and Diamond Bar Brooch, by Cartier Paris, Circa 1930. Estimate: HK$160,000-240,000 (€ 18,000 - 27,000). Unsold. © Bonhams 2001-2019

Centring upon a carved cabochon emerald, between two carved emerald beads, enhanced by corallium rubrum and onyx plaques, to single-cut diamond accents, emeralds approximately 11.35 carats total, signed Cartier, numbered, maker's mark, French assay marks, length 5.3cm

Accompanied by an authenticity report from Cartier, Paris. Report number GE2007-173, dated 26 September 2007.

Cartier
Joining the family firm at the turn of the twentieth century, three brothers had grand plans for its future. Louis, Pierre and Jacques Cartier wanted to grow the modest Parisian jewellery store that their grandfather had founded in 1847 into the leading jewellery business of the world. 

In an age before globalization, it was an unusually ambitious goal but they were determined and they had a plan: divide and conquer. 

They split the world between them, with each brother taking responsibility for a different region. Louis - the eldest - remained in Paris, looking after the chic continental European clients and creating some of the most sought-after jewellery, objets d'art and timepieces of the early twentieth century. Pierre, an astute businessman, spotted the opportunity in America well before most of his French peers and opened a New York branch in 1909 to cater to the new class of wealthy industrialists, glamorous heiresses and Hollywood stars. Jacques, the youngest, managed the London branch, where he designed pieces not only for the English aristocracy, but also for clients from the British colonies, and most significantly the Maharajas of India. Since 1911, from his frequent trips to the East, Jacques brought back many exotic stones and ideas which inspired the luxurious jewellery collections following that era and whose DNA we see in today's creations. 

FOR EVENING WEAR

598

598

Lot 598. A 9.98 Carat ‘No Oil’ Colombian Emerald and Diamond Ring. Estimate: HK$4,800,000-6,000,000 (€ 540,000 - 680,000)Sold for HK$ 4,975,625 (€ 566,661). © Bonhams 2001-2019

The step-cut emerald, weighing 9.98 carats, between two baguette-cut diamond shoulders, diamonds approximately 1.45 carats total, ring size 6½.

Accompanied by a SSEF report stating that the natural emerald has no indications of clarity modification and originates from Colombia. Report number 90326, dated 8 March 2017.

Accompanied by an AGL (American Gemological Laboratories) report stating that the natural emerald has no indications of clarity enhancement and originates from Colombia. Report number 8085858, dated 16 February 2017.

Accompanied by a Gubelin report stating that the natural emerald has no indications of clarity enhancement and originates from Colombia. Report number 17014009, dated 10 February 2017. 

Colombian "No Oil" Emeralds
Colombia accounts for approximately 70-90% of the international emerald market. Geologically speaking, Colombian emeralds are said to be the purest emeralds in the world because the deposits are the only ones on earth found in sedimentary host rock, rather than in igneous rock. Typically, emeralds contain various inclusions that are visible to the naked eye. While most emeralds on the market today have been enhanced in some way, untreated emeralds – referred to in the trade as "no oils" – are exceptionally rare, and when combined with a rich colour and a clean crystal with very few/no inclusions, their rarity and hence desirability increases significantly. Top quality "no oil" Colombian emeralds of fine, transparent material are highly sought after today.
 

608

608

Lot 608. A 5.01 Carat Unheated Kashmir Sapphire and Diamond Ring. Estimate: HK$1,600,000 - 2,400,000 (€ 180,000 - 270,000)Sold for HK$ 2,000,625 (€ 227,846) . © Bonhams 2001-2019.

The antique cushion-shaped sapphire, weighing 5.01 carats, between single-cut diamond shoulders, ring size 5½

Accompanied by a SSEF report stating that the natural sapphire has no indications of heat treatment and originates from Kashmir. Report number 105838, dated 20 March 2019.

Accompanied by an AGL (American Gemological Laboratories) report stating that the natural sapphire has no evidence of heat enhancement and originates from Kashmir. Report number 8088740, dated 14 February 2019.

Accompanied by a Gubelin report stating that the natural sapphire has no indications of heat treatment and originates from Kashmir. Report number 18122040, dated 3 January 2019. Also accompanied by an information sheet, stating that natural unheated gem-quality sapphires from Kashmir are scarce.

Kashmir
Kashmir sapphires were first discovered in the late 1870s/early 1880s high up in the snow-clad Great Himalayas of north-western India. The area was worked sporadically until the late 1920s/early 1930s but the glory years of the 1880s were never repeated. Legend tells that the finest stones from this 30-40 year period were all acquired by the Maharaja and jealously guarded in the chambers of the Kashmir State Treasury. British geologist, Charles Stewart Middlemiss, Superintendent of the Mineral Survey of Jammu and Kashmir State from 1917 until 1930, recorded seeing some of this fabled hoard, describing the sacks of rough and cut gems as a "king's ransom", with some sapphires the size of polo balls.

Today, Kashmir sapphires set the standard against which all other sapphires are measured and are avidly sought by collectors who are prepared to pay princely sums for top-quality specimens from this extraordinary period in the history of gemmology. 

602

 

602

Lot 602. A Jadeite and Diamond Ring. Estimate: HK$280,000-350,000 (€ 32,000 - 40,000)Sold for HK$ 375,625 (€ 42,778). © Bonhams 2001-2019.

The oval jadeite cabochon of intense emerald green colour, within a surround set with brilliant, marquise and emerald-cut diamonds, diamonds approximately 7.00 carats total, jadeite measuring 23.1 x 14.7 x 7.6mm, ring size 6 

Accompanied by a Hong Kong Jade & Stone Laboratory report stating that the natural colour fei cui (jadeite jade) has no resin detected. Report number SJ 182850, dated 4 April 2019. 

OTHER HIGHLIGHTS

240

240

Lot 540. A 3.04 Carat Unheated Burmese Mogok 'Pigeon's Blood' Ruby and Diamond Three-stone Ring. Estimate: HK$1,700,000 - 2,500,000 (€ 190,000 - 280,000). Unsold. © Bonhams 2001-2019.

The cushion-shaped ruby, weighing 3.04 carats, between old brilliant-cut diamonds weighing 1.09 and 1.07 carats, within a double surround set with brilliant-cut diamonds, extended to the openwork gallery and half hoop,remaining diamonds approximately 1.75 carats total, ring size 6

Accompanied by an AGL (American Gemological Laboratories) report stating that the natural ruby has no indications of heat treatment and originates from Burma (Myanmar). Report number 8088266, dated 23 August 2018. Also accompanied by an AGL premium appendix stating that the ruby is of 'pigeon blood' red hue, with a number of internal features indicating that it is from the fabled mines of Mogok valley, Burma, and is a rare, noteworthy and exceptional gemstone. 

Accompanied by a Gubelin report stating that the natural ruby has no indications of heat treatment and originates from Burma (Myanmar). Report number 16111106, dated 28 November 2016. Also accompanied by two information sheets stating that rubies from Mogok, Burma, are rare and associated with being the most desirable in the world. 

Accompanied by a GRS report stating that the natural ruby is (GRS type 'pigeon's blood') vivid red colour, has no indications of thermal treatment and originates from Burma (Mogok, Myanmar). Report number GRS2016-101110, dated 29 October 2016.

Accompanied by two GIA reports stating that the 1.09 and 1.07 carat diamonds are F and G colours, VS2 and VVS2 clarity respectively. Report numbers 2257208779 and 1156695376, dated 19 March 2017 and 15 March 2017.

Pigeon's Blood
The term comes most appropriately from Burma, home to what are considered to be the finest ruby specimens on earth and where local miners have, for generations, compared the most vivid red examples to the first drops of blood from a freshly-killed pigeon.

This vernacular description was picked up by the trade, who also reserve it for the very best-in-class coloured rubies and it subsequently appeared on a laboratory certificate for the first time in 1996. Since this date, it has been adopted by most major international laboratories. Being attributed the fabled "pigeon's blood" suffix by a laboratory confers on an unheated Mogok ruby the highest pedigree and makes it significantly more desirable in the market.

571

571

Lot 571. A Rare 4.22 Carat Unheated Kashmir Sapphire and Diamond Ring, Circa 1920. Estimate: HK$1,200,000 - 1,600,000 (€ 140,000 - 180,000)Sold for HK$ 1,188,125 (€ 135,312). © Bonhams 2001-2019.

Of floral design, the cabochon sapphire, weighing 4.22 carats, between millegrain-set single-cut diamond bifurcated shoulders, French assay mark, ring size 6½

Accompanied by a SSEF report stating that the natural sapphire has no indications of heat treatment and originates from Kashmir. Report number 85412, dated 6 April 2016.

Accompanied by a Gubelin report stating that the natural sapphire has no indications of heat treatment and originates from Kashmir. Report number 16030115, dated 23 March 2016. 

Accompanied by a GCS report stating that the natural sapphire has no indications of heat treatment and originates from Kashmir. Report number 5776-4256, dated 13 January 2016.

Kashmir Sapphires
Sapphires hailing from Kashmir display a vivid velvety blue hue that is unique to the region. They are among the most highly-prized gems due to their rarity and their scarcity and the mine that yielded the finest specimens was largely exhausted by 1887, after only a few years of production.

Today, Kashmir sapphires set the standard against which all other sapphires are measured and are avidly sought by collectors who are prepared to pay princely sums for top-quality specimens from this extraordinary period in the history of gemmology.

569

Lot 569. A Late 19th Century Diamond Tiara, Circa 1890. Estimate: HK$120,000 - 200,000 (€ 14,000 - 23,000)Sold for HK$ 150,625 (€ 17,154). © Bonhams 2001-2019

The five old brilliant-cut diamond garlands graduating in size towards the front, between similar and rose-cut diamond spacers, completed by a black silk ribbon, diamonds approximately 10.20 carats total, frame detachable, tiara frame diameter 12.8cm, detached segment length 14.5cm.